More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

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Common wearable fitness tracker helps clinicians assess at-home recovery after kids' surgery

25/11/2021

A recent study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that using a consumer-grade wearable device to track a child's heart rate and physical activity after surgery could help clinicians decide if at-home recovery is going as expected or if an emergency department (ED) visit is needed to address possible complications.
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Telemedicine at MEDICA 2021 - Boom through Corona?

18/11/2021

Telemedicine offers a wide range of technical applications for almost all medical situations: patients no longer have to visit the doctor's office in person, pharmacies can keep a close eye on medication dosages, and sensors prevent patient falls in nursing care. Has the industry received a boost through the Corona pandemic? We find out at MEDICA 2021.
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Wearable device could reduce racial disparities in blood measurements

29/10/2021

Bioengineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Arlington, in collaboration with Austin’s Shani Biotechnologies, LLC, have developed a new noninvasive technology that may help real-time monitoring of key blood parameters, such as hemoglobin, especially in Black patients.
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'Smart bandage' may help solve a major problem when treating chronic wounds

25/10/2021

How can doctors make sure a dressed wound is healing without taking off the bandage? This is a conundrum, because removing a bandage can disrupt the healing process. Technology presented in a new study in open-access journal Frontiers in Physics could help.
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Image: A Woman with a wearable; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Researchers stimulate the vision of a blind person

21/10/2021

A new brain implant based on intracortical microelectrodes can allow a blind person to see shapes and letters. New research by the Miguel Hernández Univresity shows that the implantation of this micro device in the human brain can be done safely, and that the direct stimulation of the cerebral cortex produces visual perceptions with a much higher resolution than had been achieved until now.
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Image: The ear sensor is to be worn behind the ear like a hearing aid. It transmits the most important vital parameters every 15 minutes; Copyright: Andreas Heddergott / TUM

Ear sensor permits safe telemedical care for COVID-19 risk patients

08/10/2021

Using telemedicine, COVID-19 patients can be cared for safely at home – from initial home isolation to recovery or, in case problems arise, admission to hospital. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now successfully demonstrated this in a study involving 150 patients with risk factors for a severe progression of the disease.
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Smart textiles to help older people deal with long-term pain

06/10/2021

Long-term pain is perhaps the single most important factor that reduces quality of life for older people. New technology based on therapeutic smart textiles can make it easier to manage pain. The idea behind the technology is to reduce the effects of impaired muscle strength, mobility, balance, memory or sensitivity from natural causes or illness.
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Wireless kit might be cheap alternative to usual treatment of 'glue ear' in kids

05/10/2021

A wireless kit, comprising headphones, a microphone, and an app might be a cheap alternative to the usual treatment of the common temporary hearing loss in kids, popularly known as 'glue ear,' finds a small study.
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Image: Man wearing the AI-driven dynamic face mask; Copyright: ACS Nano 2021, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c06204

AI-driven dynamic face mask adapts to exercise, pollution levels

30/09/2021

Researchers have developed a dynamic respirator that modulates its pore size in response to changing conditions, such as exercise or air pollution levels, allowing the wearer to breathe easier when the highest levels of filtration are not required.
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Development of dendritic-network-implementable artificial neurofiber transistors

23/09/2021

The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) has reported that a research team has developed organic neurofiber transistors with an architecture and functions similar to those of neurons in the human brain, which can be used as a neural network.
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Image: Woman in front of a laptop talking with doctor. On the laptop you can see her measured heart rate; Copyright: PantherMedia/VitalikRadko

New study to develop smart textiles powered by body movement for remote health monitoring

23/09/2021

For the next five years, Dr. Dharmasena will focus on creating sensor-containing super-smart textiles that can be used for remote health monitoring. The super-smart textiles will not only power electronic components, but also act as self-powered functional sensors that are able to accurately sense the movements of targeted body parts.
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Image: Production of the new surgical masks that can deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Researchers release masks that instantaneously deactivate SARS-CoV-2

20/09/2021

Researchers released a new type IIR surgical mask with an intelligent fabric that can instantaneously deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19.
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Running: how to prevent injuries with sensors and AI

01/09/2021

The most common injury that affects runners stems from overuse, not falls. Early warning signs include changes in motion. Successful injury prevention could pick up on this aspect by detecting and responding to these deviations at an early stage. It is the focus of the "Smart Injury Prevention" project.
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Wearables: smart helpers in sports medicine

01/09/2021

Heart rate monitoring, step-counting, sleep tracking: Wearable technologies keep evolving, offering more and more useful applications. Usually worn close to and/or on the surface of the skin, they are equipped with special sensors to detect and analyze information concerning physical signals or ambient data. This allows wearers to get immediate biofeedback.
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Avoid injuries, improve training – with self-learning sensors

01/09/2021

Artificial intelligence, sensors, wearables: they all collect and process data from their wearers. They are particularly popular in sports, because users no longer have to rely on their intuition, but can optimise their training based on sober, exact data. However, wearables are often criticized for being not only practical gadgets but also data krakens.
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Image: Person on a treadmill wears a smart watch which shows his or her heart rate; Copyright: PantherMedia/apid

More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables

01/09/2021

Wearables are increasingly being used in sports medicine, for example, to prevent injuries or to provide users individually with real-time data about their fitness and health. By analyzing this data, risks for sports injuries can be identified early and training can be customized to the user's needs and goals.
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Digital healthcare: Treating patients at home

03/05/2021

Digital health apps (DiGA) are increasingly becoming part of patients' everyday lives. Since the "apps on prescription" are thoroughly tested by the BfArM before approval, they are currently only tailored to individual diseases. In this Topic of the Month, we take a look at the place DiGAs already occupy in healthcare today and how they will continue to develop in the future.
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Digital healthcare: The point-of-care is shifting

21/04/2021

In this interview with MEDICA-tradefair.com, Lina Behrens explains how Flying Health helps its clients develop new business models and gives an outlook on the future of healthcare.
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Detecting atrial fibrillation early with mobile rhythm patch

08/04/2021

According to a study, a mobile rhythm patch can help detect and prevent strokes. In this interview with MEDICA, co-study leader Prof. Rolf Wachter explains how the mobile rhythm patch works and which insights the study results provide for the future.
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Image: A sick woman in lying in bed, blowing her nose and wearing a smartwatch at her wrist; Copyright: PantherMedia/ryanking999

Coronavirus: "A pandemic is a behavioral phenomenon"

31/03/2021

At the virtual.MEDICA 2020 trade fair, Prof. Dirk Brockmann delivered the keynote address in the MEDICA CONNECTED HEALTHCARE FORUM on digital epidemiology, which got a big boost thanks to the coronavirus pandemic. It can help us understand how human behavior influences the course of the pandemic.
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Image: View from behind at a runner in starting position, the sole of his shoe is in the foreground; Copyright: PantherMedia/Sorapop Udomsri

Motion analysis: wearable sensors versus laboratory

17/03/2021

In professional sports, motion analysis helps improve an athlete's performance and avoid injury. The process is complex and therefore conducted in dedicated laboratories. At the virtual MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE 2020, Prof. Stephan Odenwald explained how motion analysis could become more widely accessible in the future thanks to mobile, wearable sensors.
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Image: disinfection of a door handle around which coronaviruses are flying; Copyright: PantherMedia/AntonMatyukha

Necessity is the mother of invention – innovations in the corona pandemic

01/03/2021

Keeping your distance, washing your hands, wearing a mask – such protective measures have been the order of the day since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic began. But appropriate products or procedures are not suitable for everyone, are often unavailable or, despite everything, carry a residual risk. The need for new, better solutions is high. But necessity is the mother of invention.
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Image: a woman wearing a wearable EEG that looks like a headband; Copyright: Evercot AI GmbH

Good connection: AI and EEG work hand in hand

17/02/2021

Artificial intelligences (AI) are able to help medical professionals detect diseases. This is based on medical data records from which the AI can draw conclusions about diseases. These conclusions are most accurate when the extraction of the data sets is directly linked to the processing.
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Image: Self-disinfecting mask and associated battery are held up to the camera; Copyright: ZHAW/Hannes Heinzer

Self-disinfecting mask: germ-free at the push of a button

08/02/2021

Disinfection and masks are essential to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Swiss scientists from ZHAW and Osmotex AG have now combined the two and developed a mask that disinfects itself at the push of a button. It is to be launched on the market as early as this spring.
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Asthma: Self-management thanks to apps and wearables

11/01/2021

Today, managing one's own chronic disease is hardly possible without digital helpers – not least because of the corona pandemic. People with asthma also benefit from apps and wearables. They help patients connect better with doctors and better understand their own disease. Our Topic of the Month looks at why this is so important and what the digital services can do.
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mHealth for asthma: Help me manage it myself!

11/01/2021

According to the WHO, around 600 million people worldwide suffer from chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma. Key in the fight against these diseases is therapy adherence, but many sufferers often find this difficult. The result is increased hospitalization, which ultimately comes at the expense of the healthcare system. Smart and mobile technologies could change that.
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Breathe a sigh of relief with Respia

01/01/2021

There are many different kinds of mobile devices to help people with chronic diseases. Asthma is one of those diseases, which can be monitored with wearables to improve everyday life. Especially for parents, the stress and anxiety which come with asthma-afflicted children can be reduced with a reliable solution like Respia.
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Microimplants: electricity instead of pills

23/11/2020

Active implants such as pacemakers revolutionized healthcare decades ago. But they also have disadvantages: their size and relatively short life span, for example. At Fraunhofer IZM, research is therefore being conducted on durable microimplants that stimulate nerve cells electrically in a targeted manner and are even to be used to treat multiple sclerosis.
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Image: A young woman is wearing a flat device made from printed electronics on her forehead; Copyright: Universität Oldenburg/Abteilung Neuropsychologie

Wearable EEG: A comfortable way to record brain activity

09/11/2020

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that is used in cognitive research or to diagnose conditions such as epilepsy and sleep disorders. EEG electrode caps are somewhat difficult to wear, which is why they are only used in laboratories. One viable alternative are measuring devices made of printed electronics. They are more comfortable to wear and allow users to continue their daily activities.
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Image: A young laboratory technician with AR glasses uses a pipette, he is surrounded by different bubbles with text; Copyright: Helbling Technik Wil AG

Augmented Reality for better laboratory results

01/09/2020

Accuracy is paramount in laboratory settings and ensures that lab results are valid. Errors in a lab can render series of tests unusable and waste precious time and money. In the medical realm, this might even result in clinical trial errors. Augmented reality (AR) can help laboratory technicians to prevent errors and guide their work in the future.
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MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE: how data and AI help sports

16/06/2020

Karl Schwarzenbrunner is the head of the Education and Science Department at the German Ice Hockey Association, and also a speaker at the 8th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE 2020, which will take place this year on 18 and 19 November in Düsseldorf.
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In-ear sensors for monitoring vital parameters

22/04/2020

Wearables offer practical solutions for the flexible measurement of data. The sensor from cosinuss° is worn directly in the ear and offers a precise monitoring of vital parameters.
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Smartphone app detects cardiac arrhythmia

03/03/2020

Atrial fibrillation is one of the causes for a stroke and often appears without any previous indications. To reduce the risks and provide fast results, the application FibriCheck was invented. With the app it is possible to collect and measure data via smartphone camera.
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Cardiology: digital solutions support those coping with chronic illness

03/02/2020

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide, taking an estimated 17.9 million lives each year. Acute events such as heart attacks and strokes stand out in this setting. Chronic heart diseases can also be a debilitating condition for many patients. If cardiology uses digital methods and tools, it can reach more affected people.
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Smart care: safety and support thanks to AAL

02/12/2019

Average life expectancy keeps increasing, while birth rates are declining – at least when it comes to most industrial nations. The coming decades will see a decreasing number of gainfully employed people versus more and more senior citizens and people in need of care. It's a trend that already pushes healthcare to the brink. That's why we desperately need new concepts. One of them is AAL.
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Ambient Assisted Living: sensors for seniors

02/12/2019

Our ageing society is confronted with fewer and fewer workers. One of the many consequences is a shortage of skilled nursing staff. Ambient Assisted Living should solve this problem. By equipping the living environment of elderly people or people in need of care with (technical) assistance systems, they are to be given more self-determination and security. The nursing staff also benefits.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02/12/2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Sports Hub project changes sports medicine with big data and AI

22/10/2019

Professor Jarek Krajewski sat down for a MEDICA interview and delivered a detailed description of the Sports Hub project. It highlights how big data and AI transform the world of sports medicine. The project delivers new insights and provides a versatile database.
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Triathlete Sebastian Kienle: wearables and body awareness improve athletic performance

09/09/2019

A 2.4-mile (3.86 km) swim, a 112-mile (180.25 km) bicycle ride and a marathon 26.22-mile (42.20 km) run – that’s the Ironman Triathlon. Triathletes like Sebastian Kienle are constantly working to push beyond their limits. At the 7th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE on November 20 - 21, you can meet Kienle in person.
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Image: A physician wearing VR glasses. An image of the human heart floats in front of him in the air; Copyright: apoQlar

Virtual Surgical Intelligence: Microsoft Hololens in the OR

22/07/2019

Modern imaging opens news doors to surgeries. Yet it also poses major problems for surgeons: They use two-dimensional images to navigate through a three-dimensional surgical environment, while they continuously have to switch their focus back and forth between the images and the patient. Now help is on the way in the form of interactive 3D projections and mixed reality (MR).
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Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03/06/2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03/06/2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03/06/2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Cybersecurity in the hospital: securely networked

02/05/2019

Digitalization and networking are supposed to serve the health care system well: In times of staff shortages and demographic change, they are able to support the exchange of patient data and the management of chronic diseases as well as to improve the workflow. But it is still often ignored that both individual devices and complete networks can become lucrative targets for cybercrimes.
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Hospital cybersecurity: secure technology and trained employees go hand in hand

02/05/2019

When it comes to IT, the medical sector has a dilemma: On the one hand, digitization and networks are designed to save both time and money. Yet on the other hand, medical systems, physician offices, and hospital networks don’t have nearly the same levels of protection as online stores, payment service providers or financial institutions. That’s also partially due to an absence of risk awareness.
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Image: Woman looks at the image of an injured soccer player on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Sports medicine: preventing injuries with wearable sensors

08/02/2019

The consequences of sports injuries can be very serious and sideline athletes for a long time. Although it often seems like these injuries happen in a split second, they can also be the result of overuse and loads that usually weaken the athlete over time. This stress can be detected and reduced with wearable technology and injuries prevented before they happen.
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Image: Physician attaches electrodes to the upper back of a young woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/microgen

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: pain relief with electricity

03/12/2018

According to estimates, every third person in the world suffers from chronic pain. The most common discomforts include back pain, headaches, and nerve pain. For many sufferers, the pain is so severe that it impacts their job, social life or mind. The pain has its own clinical significance and must be treated – with electric current for example.
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Intelligent, portable, but also practicable? Wearables and smart textiles tested at MEDICA

13/11/2018

Whether intelligent Smartwatch, a vest that measures heart rate or a pocket-sized allergy test: Wearables and smart Textiles are important health aids, but how practical are they really? We did the test at MEDICA 2018.
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Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Exercise Prescription for Health: sports instead of pills

08/10/2018

Did you know that we can influence up to 50 percent of our health ourselves? If we eat a balanced diet and exercise regularly, this not only ensures longer independence in old age. Diseases can also be treated with exercise. But in many cases, physicians and patients still rely more on medication than on exercise.
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Air Next: sharing spirometry data for better treatment

24/09/2018

Some diseases require close, permanent control of the patient, especially if they are chronic and, if unchecked, potentially dangerous, like some lung diseases. Monitoring them is quite cumbersome, because patients regularly need to visit their physician or a hospital. Wireless devices for home measurements offer at least some comfort and relieve to patients.
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Image: Female hospital employee with green OR cap is wearing AR glasses, a screen is floating in front of her; Copyright: IT4process GmbH

Augmented Reality: supporting sterile processing services?

08/06/2018

Every day, hospital staff has to manage complex processes to guarantee quality and patient safety. Yet in some areas, the use of checklists and manuals tends to be more cumbersome and not useful – as is the case in sterile processing. A new project studies how augmented reality can take all the necessary information into the staff's field of view.
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The STEADY project: Managing depression with wearables

01/06/2018

These days, smartphones and wearables of all kinds more or less "incidentally" collect lots of personal data about our lives. Many people have privacy and security concerns – and rightfully so – especially if mountains of data fall into the wrong hands. But what if patients collect their own data and get help to use it for their own purposes?
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From data to diagnosis – digital help for depression

01/06/2018

Few diseases are as difficult to diagnose as depression. What's more, outsiders often don't perceive it as a disease. The reason for this are symptoms that are not directly visible. Sufferers of the disease tend to experience fear, worry, and despair in everyday life, when no doctor is present. This is the starting point for telemedicine tools such as online programs or smartphone apps.
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Biomechanical measuring systems: Versatile tools for many disciplines

02/05/2018

When human movements are no longer as smooth as they should be – due to misalignments or as the result of an injury for example – biomechanical measuring systems spring into action. Thanks to different types of sensors and optical technologies, physicians, therapists, and sports scientists embark on a search for possible causes and corrective options.
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