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Image: This photo shows four doctors in blue clothes, treating a patient in a place outside in Sudan. Only visual protection walls contribute to a little of privacy; Copyright: Boris Hegger / ICRC

Boris Hegger / ICRC

Optimizing humanitarian logistics enhancing medical supply distribution

22.02.2024

Amid global conflicts, accessing medical supplies is vital. The ICRC, dedicated to aiding millions affected, grapples with complex distribution challenges. Teaming up with ETH Zurich, they've devised new logistics solutions for efficient and timely supply delivery to crisis zones.
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Image: Professor Lanfermann (left) and his team are delighted with the new angiography system; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

Stroke: Progress in the treatment with state-of-the-art magnification technology

19.12.2023

A new, extremely powerful angiography system from Canon was put into operation at the Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology at Hannover Medical School (MHH).
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Image: Follow-up examination: Professor Duncker checks whether the implanted device is working.; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

New device against sudden cardiac death

10.11.2023

Hannover Heart Rhythm Center at MHH implants Germany's first innovative defibrillator with an electrode under the sternum.
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Image: A medical van with “Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit” written on it; Copyright: NewYork-Presbyterian

NewYork-Presbyterian

Mobile stroke units increase odds of averting stroke

03.11.2023

Receiving a clot-busting drug in an ambulance-based mobile stroke unit (MSU) increases the likelihood of averting strokes and complete recovery compared with standard hospital emergency care.
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Image: Miniature defibrillator

CellAED

CellAED: a success story that started at MEDICA

02.10.2023

When the Australian company Rapid Response Revival Research Limited (RRR) came to MEDICA for the first time, they were still a start-up with a prototype. In 2023, they are returning with a full-grown product that has sold 10,000 units in less than a year. Their CellAED is a miniature automated defibrillator that can be kept close in case sudden cardiac arrest occurs somewhere.
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Image: Portrait photo of a man (Steef Kurstjens) with red-brown hair in a white doctor's coat; Copyright: European Society for Emergency Medicine

European Society for Emergency Medicine

ChatGPT suggests most likely diagnoses in the emergency medicine department

25.09.2023

The artificial intelligence chatbot ChatGPT performed as well as a trained doctor in suggesting likely diagnoses for patients being assessed in emergency medicine departments.
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Image: an intern shows an senior physician something on a tablet. The two stand on a glass gallery in a hospital; Copyright: monkeybusiness

monkeybusiness

Into the hospital of the future: data, digitization and artificial intelligence

18.07.2023

Artificial intelligence (AI) and its use is on everyone's lips right now. How AI will change and shape our future is being hotly debated. AI applications are also trending in healthcare. But before they can deliver on their huge expectations, the basics have to be met.
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Image: Test in the Bletterbach Gorge; 5 people rehearse a rescue operation; Copyright: Eurac Research/Annelie Bortolotti

Eurac Research/Annelie Bortolotti

First aid: drones make a difference in emergencies

07.06.2023

The Eurac Research-led team simulated 24 missions at different locations in the Bletterbach Gorge. Locations were chosen where, according to reports from the South Tyrolean Mountain Rescue, accidents have actually occurred in the past decade.
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Image: A man in a blue coat, Araz Rawshani, poses for the camera.; Copyright: University of Gothenburg

University of Gothenburg

AI supports doctors’ hard decisions on cardiac arrest

21.02.2023

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed three such systems of decision support for cardiac arrest that may, in the future, make a major difference to doctors’ work.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Mass accidents – Measuring vital signs from the air with "FALKE"

09.02.2022

The flight system "FALKE" (German for "falcon") could improve care during MCI events (mass casualty incidents). Using different camera systems and AI, it could be able to determine nature and amount of the different injuries. It could also measure the vital signs of injured persons to help the control center gain a better overview of the situation.
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Image: Emergency cardiology. ecg with supraventricular arrhythmias and brief atrial fibrillation ; Copyright: PantherMedia/Olga355

PantherMedia/Olga355

Screening for atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke

30.08.2021

Screening for atrial fibrillation in 75- and 76-year-olds could reduce the risk of stroke, severe bleeding and death, according to a study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that has been published.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Staff communication via app – Rescue Center uses smart way of information

22.07.2021

Staying in touch with your staff always, everywhere: The Malteser Hilfsdienst (a relief organization in the healthcare sector) in Mainz, Germany, use an app to keep their staff up to date. Learn more about the advantages of the app, especially for shift duty and the healthcare sector, how the app IK-up! works and how employees can contribute to topics in our video interview.
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Image: a transportable device that visually resembles a pistol; Copyright: REACT

REACT

Life-saving device rapidly stops bleeding from knife wounds

05.07.2021

Joseph Bentley, a final year Product Design and Technology student, has designed REACT – a new method for rapidly stopping catastrophic blood loss from a knife wound that could be carried out by first responding police officers while waiting for an ambulance.
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Image: A swab is lying across a sample vial; Copyright: PantherMedia/fotoquique

Point-of-care tests: rapid diagnosis in emergency situations

01.06.2021

In emergency medicine, a faster diagnosis leads to a faster treatment of the patient. Point-of-care test solutions can provide immediate on-site insights into the patient’s condition. COVID-19 adds another dimension: the devices can provide a level of security and safety – one that goes beyond intensive care.
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Image: Close-up of an ultrasound head in the gloved hand of a physician; Copyright: PantherMedia/Bork

Faster treatment thanks to point-of-care diagnostics – in emergencies and beyond

01.06.2021

Making an informed and immediate treatment decision near or at the patient’s bedside – point-of-care testing (also known as POCT) makes this possible. Unlike stationary devices, special exam rooms or other service infrastructure, POC diagnostic devices offer a multitude of benefits including more flexibility, faster results, and lower costs.
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Image: An emergency operation with ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia / HayDmitriy

PantherMedia / HayDmitriy

Point-of-care ultrasound helps in emergency diagnosis

01.06.2021

Medical emergencies require quick action and prompt decisions: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a valuable diagnostic tool available to the emergency physician. Rather than relying on his/her gut feeling, the device answers specific clinical questions that narrow differentials. The question is, in which settings does POCUS deliver the biggest benefits?
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Image: An emergency physician is measuring the blood pressure of an injured boy on a stretcher; Copyright: PantherMedia/Arne Trautmann

Emergency medicine: point-of-care diagnostic at the deployment site

01.06.2021

The sooner diagnosis can be made during an emergency, the faster the patient receives help. While most diagnostics still take place at the hospital, emergency physicians use more and more mobile devices directly at the deployment site. This is how they can save precious time. We take a look at some point-of-care applications in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Rescue team in action; Copyright: PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

Mobile and intelligent – emergency blood analysis

08.03.2021

Things need to move fast in an emergency. Making the right call in this setting can be a challenge for emergency medical services – especially when symptoms are ambiguous, which is the case if a patient has difficulty breathing or exhibits a cardiovascular or poisoning emergency. A blood analysis is paramount to deliver a fast and accurate diagnosis. This is where mobOx comes in.
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Image: Female physician is looking a CT images of the brain next to a patient in an ICU bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

Comprehensive stroke care: faster, closer, better

02.06.2020

"Time is brain!" – a fundamental rule in stroke care because time is of the essence when brain regions are undersupplied with oxygen and glucose. If circulation is not restored quickly, brain damage can be permanent. However, the key point here is not just to "be fast", but also to "use the time to treat stroke effectively".
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Image: Ambulance on the road; Copyright: PantherMedia / inhabitant

PantherMedia / inhabitant

Mobile stroke units: improved outcomes for ischemic stroke

02.06.2020

If someone is having a stroke, you call an ambulance. But getting to the hospital can be time-consuming. To prevent long-term disabilities and death, patients need to be treated as quickly as possible. According to a recent study by the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, mobile stroke units play a key role in this setting.
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Image: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Stroke care: When every minute counts

02.06.2020

Stroke can affect anyone – older as well as younger people. The minutes after the stroke determine whether disability or death is the result. Only if acute care, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation are carried out in a targeted and effective manner, the chances are greater that only minor damage remains or that impairments even recede.
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