MEDICA: Imaging & Diagnostics
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Determined

A sugar analysis could reveal different types of cancer

22/12/2023

In the future, a little saliva may be enough to detect an incipient cancer. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed an effective way to interpret the changes in sugar molecules that occur in cancer cells.
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Image: Radiologist does mammograms for woman to check for breast cancer; Copyright: astakhovyaroslav

astakhovyaroslav

AI can identify women with high risk of breast cancer screenings

13/12/2023

The use of AI makes it possible for women with a high risk of breast cancer to be identified in mammography screening examinations so that the cancer can be caught earlier. An international research group led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden can now show that the method is effective in different European countries.
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Image: Person lying on the stretcher of an MRI scanner while a doctor puts headphones on her head; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

3-Tesla MRI Scanner: A Glimpse into the Future of Medical Technology

31/10/2023

With novel technology and the integration of artificial intelligence, a new MRI scanner promises to significantly improve medical imaging. The scanner is characterized by its high performance and enables a more precise analysis of image data by means of an AI functionality.
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paegagz

Algorithm to predict disease relapses

29/09/2023

A University of Texas at Arlington research team has received a $450,000 grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences to use statistical machine learning to review patient data and better predict which patients will need additional treatments.
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svitlanah

New blood marker can identify parkinsonian diseases

20/09/2023

Is it possible that a single biomarker can detect all types of diseases related to dopamine deficiency in the brain? Yes, that's what a research group in Lund is discovering.
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Image: Woman with blonde hair and a light blue blouse smiles at the camera. There are trees in the background; Copyright: Karolinska Institutet

Karolinska Institutet

Breast cancer: more cases detected with the help of AI

15/09/2023

One radiologist supported by AI detected more cases of breast cancer in screening mammography than two radiologists working together, reports the ScreenTrustCAD study from Karolinska Institutet in The Lancet Digital Health.
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wirestock

Premature infants: early detection of vascular disease

14/09/2023

Dr. Anne Hilgendorff’s team from Helmholtz Munich and the LMU University Hospital developed a non-invasive method with no need for sedation using MR imaging to detect early signs of vascular disease associated with chronic pulmonary impairment in premature infants, offering new avenues for risk stratification and potential prevention of complications later in life.
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Image: A sign with the word Triage Room at the emergency entrance of a hospital or medical clinic; Copyright: ThamKC

ThamKC

AI-powered triage platform could aid future viral outbreak response

12/09/2023

A team of researchers from Yale University and other institutions globally has developed an innovative patient triage platform powered by artificial intelligence (AI) that the researchers say is capable of predicting patient disease severity and length of hospitalization during a viral outbreak.
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Dt. Leberstiftung

Predicting severe liver disease with simple tools

08/09/2023

A European consortium with the participation of the MHH is developing a new tool to determine the individual risk of liver fibrosis and liver cancer.
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Image: Woman and man in white coats stand in front of an emergency clinic and pose for the camera; Copyright: Axel Kirchhof | UKE

Axel Kirchhof | UKE

Modifiable risk factors responsible for half of cardiovascular diseases

07/09/2023

Scientists of the Global Cardiovascular Risk Consortium have proven that the five classic cardiovascular risk factors overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, and diabetes mellitus are directly connected to more than half of all cardiovascular diseases worldwide.
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YuriArcursPeopleimages

AI could shorten the diagnostic journey of millions suffering from endometriosis

16/08/2023

The quality of life of millions suffering from endometriosis – a painful disease where sensitive tissue grows outside of the uterus – could be improved by a new artificial intelligence (AI) system with technology developed by the University of Adelaide in South Australia, in partnership with researchers from the University of Surrey.
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Image: Two men looking into the camera, one holding a cable and the other a circuit board ; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

REM sleep study: new ways of early Parkinson's therapy

15/08/2023

Disturbed dream sleep may indicate later Parkinson's disease. Researchers at MHH Neurology are now investigating the preliminary phase of the neurodegenerative disease and are offering places for study participants.
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Image: an intern shows an senior physician something on a tablet. The two stand on a glass gallery in a hospital; Copyright: monkeybusiness

monkeybusiness

Into the hospital of the future: data, digitization and artificial intelligence

18/07/2023

Artificial intelligence (AI) and its use is on everyone's lips right now. How AI will change and shape our future is being hotly debated. AI applications are also trending in healthcare. But before they can deliver on their huge expectations, the basics have to be met.
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Image: Group picture with 16 people, at Fraunhofer IZM in Berlin in spring; Copyright: Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

Fraunhofer IZM

Pregnancy: intelligent patch for remote monitoring

03/07/2023

A patch equipped with highly sensitive electronics is meant to collect and evaluate vital data. In addition, the sensors will be integrated into baby clothing in order to improve the future of medical monitoring for newborns with the highest level of data security.
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Image: Two young men in white coats, Dr. Jonas Hall and Dr. Niklas Klümper, pose in front of the camera in a research complex; Copyright: University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

Metastatic renal cell carcinoma: improved prediction of therapy response

29/06/2023

The study demonstrates a significant improvement in predicting the response to therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma by incorporating the level of inflammation, which was assessed using two straightforward blood parameters, alongside the conventional imaging-based approach.
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lucigerma

Atrial fibrillation: supermarket trolleys set to help diagnosis

29/06/2023

It could be the shopping trip that saves your life: supermarket trolleys are helping to diagnose atrial fibrillation which can then be treated to prevent disabling or fatal strokes.
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tommyandone

Heart failure: AI identifies five subtypes

01/06/2023

Five subtypes of heart failure that could potentially be used to predict future risk for individual patients have been identified in a new study led by UCL (University College London) researchers.
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Image: 3D cross section of a kidney; Copyright: European Cooperation in Science and Technology

European Cooperation in Science and Technology

Imaging chronic kidney disease

12/05/2023

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has shown a high potential to distinguish biomarkers for CKD, but renal MRI biomarkers are currently underused in research and clinical practice.
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Image: Senior Woman tests blood for glucose or sugar level for diabetes with glucometer; Copyright: Manuta

Manuta

Big Data: predictive model for complications in diabetes

01/05/2023

For their research, the team led by Rainer Oberbauer, Head of the Division of Nephrology and Dialysis at MedUni Vienna's Department of Medicine III, and Mariella Gregorich from MedUni Vienna's Center for Medical Data Science drew on data from major international studies.
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Image: Pregnant woman sitting on bed checking her blood sugar level with glucometer; Copyright: AnnaStills

AnnaStills

Type 2 diabetes: risk displayed in early pregnancy blood samples

27/04/2023

Researchers from the University of Turku discovered that women who developed prediabetes after pregnancy had aberrations already in their early pregnancy blood serum metabolomic profile.
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Image: A doctor does an EEG scan on a patient; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Computer-assisted procedure classifies Ataxia-related speech disturbances

25/04/2023

Researchers at DZNE and the University Hospital Bonn, together with the Berlin-based company PeakProfiling GmbH, have developed a computer-assisted method that recognizes the severity of speech disturbances resulting from ataxia, a brain disease, with great accuracy.
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Image:An ophthalmologist looking at an OCT image together with the patient; Copyright: olgaseleznovaphoto

olgaseleznovaphoto

FALCO project: Comprehensive glaucoma prevention thanks to low-cost screening system

20/04/2023

Glaucoma is wicked, because the disease often goes undetected until irreversible damage of the optic nerve has occurred. This makes regular eye exams even more important. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging method that facilitates an early diagnosis. However, traditional OCT machines are very expensive. That’s why the FALCO project aims to develop a more cost-effective system.
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Image: Close up of both hands and forearms with characteristic monkeypox on a blue background; Copyright: Shutterstock.com/Marina Demidiuk

Shutterstock.com/Marina Demidiuk

App for AI-assisted detection of monkeypox skin lesions

07/04/2023

A paper produced as part of the DAKI-FWS project (data and AI-supported early warning system to stabilize the German economy) will be featured in the prestigious journal Nature Medicine.
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Image: ENT doctor or dentist with a medical instrument examining the oral cavity; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

ONWARD Medical NV

PANDORA test could pave the way for better oral cancer detection

06/04/2023

Surrey scientists have developed a proof-of-concept test called PANDORA that was shown to be over 92% accurate at identifying patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The test was also shown to be more than 80% accurate at identifying patients with pre-cancer or oral epithelial dysplasia (OED).
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Image: The SPUR tool, a plastic dispenser, can help patients living with Type 2 Diabetes take their medications correctly; Copyright: Kingston University

Kingston University

Medication adherence tool predicts hospital admissions of Type 2 Diabetes patients

28/03/2023

A pioneering behavioural diagnostic tool developed by Kingston University, London and healthcare technology company Observia to help patients take their medication as prescribed is the first holistic model in the world to accurately predict hospital admissions and readmissions in people living with Type 2 Diabetes, according to a new study.
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Image: Closeup of ultrasound examination of abdominal cavity, stomach and heart with sonography sensor; Copyright: Natabuena

Natabuena

Ultrasound method could lead to easier disease diagnosis in body tissue

17/03/2023

A new ultrasound method that can measure the level of tension in human tissue for the first time - a key indicator of disease - has been developed by researchers from the University of Sheffield.
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Rawpixel

Bracelet sensor assesses troponin levels to aid heart attack diagnosis

13/03/2023

An experimental wrist-worn device was found to predict troponin-I and obstructed arteries with 90% accuracy in five minutes, according to research.
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Image: A man in a blue shirt, Professor Dr Alexander Schönhuth, standing next to a wall and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Bielefeld University/Sarah Jonek

Bielefeld University/Sarah Jonek

Predicting outbreak of ALS disease with AI methods

08/03/2023

Using artificial intelligence (AI) methods, researchers led by Professor Dr Alexander Schönhuth from Bielefeld University’s Faculty of Technology have succeeded in recording and deciphering the genotype profiles of 3,000 ALS patients and thus learning more about the development of the disease.
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microgen

Poor balance may indicate changes in brain volume

06/03/2023

In a study recently published in Gait & Posture, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that the volume of the hippocampus is correlated with a measure of balance ability in healthy older people.
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Image: Two men in white laboratory clothing are working on new quantum light modules; Copyright: FBH/P. Immerz

FBH/P. Immerz

Entangled photon pairs to help fighting cancer

06/03/2023

The recently launched QEED project aims to significantly reduce measurement time in clinical cancer diagnostics by developing a spectrally resolved imaging technique based on entangled photon pairs. FBH scientists will develop the required diode lasers and quantum light modules.
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Image: Mattias Ekstedt, senior associate professor at Linköping smiles at the camera; Copyright: Thor Balkhed/Linköping University

Thor Balkhed/Linköping University

Adverse muscle composition associated with increased mortality risk in people with fatty liver disease

01/03/2023

Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle contribute to an increasing number of people developing fatty liver disease. There is a need for early detection of individuals at risk of developing sequelae.
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LightFieldStudios

Balance ability predicts cognitive impairment

28/02/2023

In a study recently published in BMC Geriatrics, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed a new measure of physical balance that could help to identify individuals who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD).
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Image: Image compares simulated results from imaging the human chest with ordinary radiography (left) and with phase-contrast radiography; Copyright: Häggmark et al., 2023

Häggmark et al., 2023

Early-stage lung disease could be detected with advanced imaging tech

24/02/2023

An imaging process that today is used mainly in research labs could potentially detect early-stage lung disease if developed for use in hospitals and clinics, a new research study shows.
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Image: Immune cell trafficking in diabetic cataract formation.; Copyright: HAWK

HAWK

Imaging: role of immune cells in early diabetic cataract development

22/02/2023

The team of researchers, led by Prof. Dr. Ali Hafezi-Moghadam, Director of the Molecular Biomarkers Nano-Imaging Laboratory (MBNI), in collaboration with Professor Dr. Christoph Rußmann, Dean of the Health Campus and a Visiting Professor at MBNI, found early signs of damage in the eye before the onset of type 2 diabetes.
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Image: A man in a blue coat, Araz Rawshani, poses for the camera.; Copyright: University of Gothenburg

University of Gothenburg

AI supports doctors’ hard decisions on cardiac arrest

21/02/2023

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed three such systems of decision support for cardiac arrest that may, in the future, make a major difference to doctors’ work.
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Image: Noninvasive intracranial pressure meter fixed to a man's head; Copyright: EPO

EPO

Low brain pressure could be a risk factor for developing glaucoma

20/02/2023

An international team of researchers led by Lithuanian scientists provide additional evidence that intracranial pressure plays an important role in normal-tension glaucoma, which accounts for up to 50 per cent of all glaucoma cases.
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Image: Dr Rytis Maskeliūnas poses smiling in front of the camera, Copyright: Kaunas University of Technology (KTU)

Kaunas University of Technology (KTU)

Altered speech may be the first sign of Parkinson’s disease

31/01/2023

Lithuanian researcher from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Rytis Maskeliūnas, together with colleagues from the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences (LSMU), tried to identify early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease using voice data.
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Image: Pregnant woman in a yellow dress is looking at her phone; Copyright: DragonImages

DragonImages

All-round care: digital services during pregnancy

16/01/2023

Digital services relating to pregnancy are still far from commonplace in Germany. Yet their usefulness is beyond question. Of course, they should not replace the midwife or the visit to the doctor. But in our Topic of the Month, you can find out just how diverse the possibilities of digitization can be during the time between a positive pregnancy test and birth.
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Image: Close-up Of A Man Checking Blood Sugar Level At Home With Glucometer And Test Strips; Copyright: dolgachov

dolgachov

Type 2 diabetes: Machine learning can predict poor glycemic control from patient information systems

13/01/2023

The risk for poor glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes can be predicted with confidence by using machine learning methods, a new study from Finland finds.
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Image: Small moldecules - illustration in orange; Copyright: Aalto University

Aalto University

Gaining unprecedented view of small molecules by machine learning

06/01/2023

A new tool to identify small molecules offers benefits for diagnostics, drug discovery and fundamental research. A new machine learning model will help scientists identify small molecules, with applications in medicine, drug discovery and environmental chemistry.
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Image: Brain monitoring software is displayed on a monitor; Copyright: Tuomas Svärd, Antti-Jussi Haapala, Jukka Kortelainen

Tuomas Svärd, Antti-Jussi Haapala, Jukka Kortelainen

Cerenion: AI software improves brain monitoring

27/09/2022

Intensive care patients need to be monitored closely in all areas. For a better overview of the brain functions, Cerenion developed software called C-Trend. With artificial intelligence, the care for intensive care patients can be significantly improved.
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Image: Thierry Nordmann (left) & Lisa Schweizer are standing in the lab, each with a pipette in hand and a microtiter plate in front of them; Copyright: Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Deep Visual Proteomics: tracking down cancer

08/09/2022

Proteins are frequently called the building blocks of life because they are found everywhere, including in our cells. This makes them an important factor when it comes to diseases. As a result, mapping the protein landscape can be a crucial ally in the fight against diseases. Now, a German-Danish team has developed a method that provides researchers with unprecedented insights into cancer.
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Image: Two hands with gloves are sticking a wearable to a patient's chest; Copyright: MediBioSense

MediBioSense

MediBioSense: Real-time patient monitoring

01/09/2022

Medical wearables become more and more sophisticated. By now, they are not only able to record vital signs. With the Vital Connect Patch, MediBioSense is offering a wearable that can be used for real-time monitoring of patients.
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Image: Two female researchers examine the odor of a sample in a laboratory setting; Copyright: microgen@gmail.com

microgen@gmail.com

Digital nose facilitates early detection and diagnosis

22/06/2022

Many diseases can be treated successfully if they are diagnosed early. Research into a “digital (electronic) nose” is one promising development to facilitate early detection and diagnosis. That’s because body odors and their molecular composition are an early indicator of various diseases that often remain undetected in the early stages.
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Affair of the heart: MRI – Detecting coronary heart disease hazard patterns

03/02/2022

The University Hospital Düsseldorf is researching a new method of heart imaging in the MRI: It can detect the early formation of coronary heart disease and show associated lesions before they cause any symptoms. A contrast agent containing fluorine atoms is used for this. We learn more about this method in the video interview with Prof. Ulrich Flögel and Dr. Florian Bönner.
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Image: PASPORT, a new saliva-based COVID-19 ART test; Copyright: Duke-NUS Medical School

Duke-NUS Medical School

COVID-19 saliva Amplified Antigen Rapid Test is as sensitive as PCR test

09/12/2021

A potentially game-changing Antigen Rapid Test (ART) technology to diagnose COVID-19 has been developed by scientists in Singapore. Using a proprietary on-kit amplification technique, a person's saliva can be self-administered or tested for the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Image: a woman is getting her eyes scanned for diseases; Copyright: PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

Deep Learning: How artificial neural networks can support diagnostics

03/12/2021

The use of artificial intelligence and deep learning in medical diagnostics is growing rapidly. Ubotica’s neural network is based on deep learning and detects the presence of diabetic retinopathy in retinal images. Dr. Holger Pfeifer talks about the project successes, and reveals the obstacles researchers must continue to overcome in adopting deep learning systems.
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Image: Professor Dr Peter Hillemanns and PD Dr Matthias Jentschke with the HPV self-tests; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Prevention of cervical cancer with HPV self-testing

28/10/2021

Cervical cancer is one of the most common diseases of the female reproductive organs. Human papilloma viruses are almost always responsible for cervical cancer and the corresponding precancerous lesions. As part of the statutory preventive medical check-up, women from the age of 20 can have a cell smear taken from the cervix once a year, the so-called Pap test, to detect cell changes.
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Image: The researchers incorporated their sensor into a prototype with a fiber optic tip that can detect changes in fluorescence in the test sample; Copyright: MIT

MIT

Carbon nanotube-based sensor can detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins

26/10/2021

Using specialized carbon nanotubes, MIT engineers have designed a novel sensor that can detect SARS-CoV-2 without any antibodies, giving a result within minutes. Their new sensor is based on technology that can quickly generate rapid and accurate diagnostics, not just for Covid-19 but for future pandemics, the researchers say.
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Image: Person on a treadmill wears a smart watch which shows his or her heart rate; Copyright: PantherMedia/apid

More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables

01/09/2021

Wearables are increasingly being used in sports medicine, for example, to prevent injuries or to provide users individually with real-time data about their fitness and health. By analyzing this data, risks for sports injuries can be identified early and training can be customized to the user's needs and goals.
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Image: an electronic patch; Copyright: Nature Biomedical Engineering

Nature Biomedical Engineering

Soft skin patch could provide early warning for strokes, heart attacks

23/07/2021

Engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a soft and stretchy ultrasound patch that can be worn on the skin to monitor blood flow through major arteries and veins deep inside a person's body.
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Image: Four men next to a CT - Peter Brotchie, Dr. Ruwan Tennakoon, Prof. John Thangarajah, Dr. Mark Page; Copyright: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

New AI tech for early detection of prostate cancer

16/07/2021

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer and a leading cause of death by cancer in Australian men. Early detection is key to successful treatment, but men often dodge the doctor, avoiding diagnosis tests until it is too late.
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Image: A technical band aid; Copyright: Williamson Adams

Williamson Adams

Detecting atrial fibrillation early with mobile rhythm patch

08/04/2021

According to a study, a mobile rhythm patch can help detect and prevent strokes. In this interview with MEDICA, co-study leader Prof. Rolf Wachter explains how the mobile rhythm patch works and which insights the study results provide for the future.
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Image: A woman sitting in front of a device for an eye examination; Copyright: PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

Alzheimer's disease: early detection using an eye exam

22/03/2021

Alzheimer's disease is still incurable, but if detected early enough, countermeasures can improve treatment and slow the progression. Unfortunately, there is still no reliable early detection test at this juncture. This might soon change thanks to a non-invasive spectroscopy of the retina.
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Image: a woman wearing a wearable EEG that looks like a headband; Copyright: Evercot AI GmbH

Evercot AI GmbH

Good connection: AI and EEG work hand in hand

17/02/2021

Artificial intelligences (AI) are able to help medical professionals detect diseases. This is based on medical data records from which the AI can draw conclusions about diseases. These conclusions are most accurate when the extraction of the data sets is directly linked to the processing.
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Image: stretchy skin patch; Copyright: Wang lab/UC San Diego

Wang lab/UC San Diego

Wearables: skin patch as an all-in-one health monitor

17/02/2021

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer's levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the human body at the same time.
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Image: Two people looking at a smartwatch; Copyright: PantherMedia/DraginImages

PantherMedia/DraginImages

Wearables can detect COVID-19 symptoms and predict diagnosis

09/02/2021

Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, Mount Sinai researchers report in one of the first studies on the topic. The findings were published in Journal of Medical Internet Research.
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Image: Nurse checking surveillance monitor at the bedside and writing down patient data on a clipboard; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

PantherMedia/Kzenon

Big Data: early warning system for the ICU

03/08/2020

Patient monitoring systems in the ICU sound up to 700 alarms on average per patient per day, which boils down to one alarm every two minutes. An excessive number of them are false alarms. This generates vast amounts of data, which can make it difficult for doctors and nurses to identify the most critical alarms to manage. It also has a negative effect on the treatment of intensive care patients.
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Image: Intensive care bed equipped with high-tech devices; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

PantherMedia/sudok1

Balancing high-tech with humanity – digitization in the Intensive Care Unit

03/08/2020

No other hospital area features as much high-tech equipment as the intensive care unit. Each acute care hospital bed has four to ten devices that continuously monitor all patient vital signs and can replace nearly any organ. This creates big data that is often not used effectively. Yet it also holds promise and huge potential.
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Image: Intensive care unit with VitalSky installation over two beds; Copyright: Markus van Offern

VitalSky: how an artificial sky improves ICU patient recovery

03/08/2020

Delirium occurs in 30 to 80 percent of patients in intensive care units. This cerebral impairment not only causes mental confusion and emotional disruption but also drastically increases the mortality risk of patients. A controlled circadian rhythm and sleep/wake cycle is the prerequisite for delirium prevention. This is where the new VitalMinds concept from Philips comes in.
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02/06/2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: man holding his finger to the smartphone camera; Copyright: FibriCheck

Smartphone app detects cardiac arrhythmia

03/03/2020

Atrial fibrillation is one of the causes for a stroke and often appears without any previous indications. To reduce the risks and provide fast results, the application FibriCheck was invented. With the app it is possible to collect and measure data via smartphone camera.
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Image: Man sitting next to an older woman wearing vr glasses on a couch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/draoscondreaw

panthermedia.net/draoscondreaw

Sensor-Based Smart Glove Enables Parkinson's Diagnosis

25/02/2020

Neurological disorders like Parkinson's are often diagnosed once the disease has already progressed to a later stage. The VAFES project was initiated to facilitate an early detection. Sensor technology and VR are used in the creation of a playful test system.
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Image: person holding hand to the heart with a graphic depiction of a heart in front of them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/suriyaphoto

Cardisiography: A Non-Invasive Heart Screening Test

03/02/2020

Coronary heart disease can come as a complete surprise and occur suddenly. Cardisiography was designed to lower the risk and make faster intervention possible. As a non-invasive heart screening test, cardisiography offers the possibility of early detection for heart diseases.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: Blood sample labelled

panthermedia.net/olanstock

Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08/11/2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
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Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15/05/2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08/05/2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01/03/2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
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Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01/03/2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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