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Image: The graphic visualizes the 3D bio-printing method. It shows two needles injecting hydrogels and fibers; Copyright: Universität Bayreuth

Universität Bayreuth

Advanced 3D printing technology improves tissue engineering

19.02.2024

Advancements in 3D printing technology are improving tissue engineering, offering promising prospects for the artificial production of biological tissues. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have developed a changing technique that combines hydrogels and fibers, opening new avenues for tissue fabrication.
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Image: A stained micrograph of 3D primary human liver cell tissue modeling MASH. Areas of fibrosis are indicated in blue; Copyright: Viscient Biosciences

Viscient Biosciences

Revolutionizing liver disease research with 3D bioprinted model

07.02.2024

Metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH), previously known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a liver disease characterized by inflammation and scarring, reaching epidemic proportions with an estimated 1.5 percent to 6.5 percent of U.S. adults affected.
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Image: Close up of a contact lens being put into an eye

Contact lenses for early glaucoma detection

31.01.2024

Glaucoma affects approximately 70 million people worldwide and poses a significant threat to vision, often leading to irreversible vision loss if left untreated. Nearly half of those afflicted with this condition remain unaware of its presence. Typically progressing gradually, glaucoma often escapes early detection, making it crucial to develop new tools for its timely diagnosis and treatment.
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Image: Two people in a laboratory working with a nanoparticle paste and light. Copyright: Empa

Empa

Smart wound sealing with nanoparticles and light soldering

24.01.2024

Empa researchers have pioneered a novel soldering process that employs nanoparticles and lasers to gently fuse tissue, ushering in a new era in wound closure.
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Image: A printer applies the dopamine-based tissue adhesive to the three-dimensional titanium shaft of a hip joint; Copyright: Fraunhofer CMI

Fraunhofer CMI

Inspired by mussels: printable adhesives for tissues and bones

08.12.2023

Titanium hip implants do not last forever — they gradually loosen, sooner or later losing their hold on the bone as it recedes over time. Researchers at the Fraunhofer IAP have been working alongside the Fraunhofer IGB and the Fraunhofer CMI to develop a tissue adhesive that can help avoid early replacement of prostheses in the future.
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Image: An artist’s impression of a GELECTO machine interacting with biological cells via sending and reading of electrical and biochemical signals; Copyright: Leibniz-IPF, Ivan Minev

Leibniz-IPF, Ivan Minev

New era of cyborganics – Prof. Ivan Minev receives ERC Consolidator Grant

30.11.2023

Over the next five years, the ERC will provide two million euro of funding for the development of a new class of electronic components that consist almost entirely of water and could make the interface between biological tissue and machine seamless.
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Image: 3D simulation of an active material in a geometric shape resembling a dividing cell; Copyright: Singh et al. Physics of Fluids (2023) / MPI-CBG

Singh et al. Physics of Fluids (2023) / MPI-CBG

New computer code for mechanics of tissues and cells in three dimensions

28.11.2023

Open-source supercomputer algorithm predicts patterning and dynamics of living materials and enables studying their behavior in space and time.
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Image: A group photo consisting of eleven people in front of a white wall. A confirmation of project funding is held in the camera; Copyright: HIPS

HIPS

Strengthening of drug bioinformatics at the Saarbrücken site

21.11.2023

In the context of the tenure negotiations for Drug Bioinformatics Professor Olga Kalinina, the Klaus Faber Foundation is providing €100,000 to the "bioINFpro" project, thereby enabling her long-term stay at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and Saarland University.
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Image: At the pilot plant, a 3D printer builds the scaffold from the composite material; Copyright: BellaSeno

BellaSeno

Bioactive composite supports healing of broken bones

09.11.2023

A broken bone failing to heal represents an enormous burden for patients. Fraunhofer researchers have worked alongside partners to develop a composite material to be used in the treatment of such non-union cases. The resulting implant is designed to significantly improve treatment success rates and speed up the healing process.
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Image: “Organ-on-chip” symbol image. Close-up of a biochip on a black background; Copyright: NMI

NMI

Menopause: leveraging organ-on-chip technology for new insights

09.10.2023

Addressing the impact of female menopause on dynamic resilience and exploring preventive and therapeutic strategies is the aim of an international and interdisciplinary research group led by Prof. Dr. Peter Loskill from the NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen.
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Image: Abstract virus blood cells; Copyright: Malmö University

Malmö University

New sensors could replace current infection testing

04.10.2023

New technology could pave the way to a future of rapid testing in hospitals and at home for both covid and urinary tract infection. It could also be used to keep track of blood sugar levels during operations and wireless monitoring of various bacterial infections.
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Image: Dr. Marina Dziuba in the laboratory with bacterial cultures to produce magnetic nanoparticles; Copyright: Christian Wißler/UBT

Christian Wißler/UBT

EXIST funding for bacterial magnetic nanoparticles

28.09.2023

BioMagnetix uses bacterial magnetic nanoparticles as innovative materials for biomedical applications. The founding team aims to develop and continuously improve high-quality and highly functional magnetic nanoparticles for imaging techniques and therapeutic purposes, such as cancer treatment.
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Image: Schematic structure of a sensor for the detection of viral pathogens; Copyright: TUD

TUD

Diagnostics: pioneering approaches for the detection of viral antigens

22.09.2023

Scientists from the Chair of Materials Science and Nanotechnology at TU Dresden (TUD) have made considerable progress in the development of highly innovative solutions for the detection of viral pathogens in two studies they presented recently.
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Image: Microscopy image and artistic representation of the CHOOSE system in a human brain organoid; Copyright: Knoblich Lab / IMBA-IMP Graphics

Knoblich Lab / IMBA-IMP Graphics

Autism: brain organoid shows genetic bases

21.09.2023

Technology, developed by researchers from the Knoblich group at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Treutlein group at ETH Zurich, permits the identification of vulnerable cell types and gene regulatory networks that underlie autism spectrum disorders.
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Image: Female engineer in laboratory clothing inspects a small circuit board; Copyright: wosunan

wosunan

Microrobots: opportunities for cancer treatment and wound healing

18.09.2023

A group of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed the world’s first microrobot (“microbot”) capable of navigating within groups of cells and stimulating individual cells.
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Image: A bald man in a white coat stands in a laboratory and looks over at other people; Copyright: Joakim Palmqvist

Joakim Palmqvist

Advanced biosensors to detect tumors, viruses and bacterial diseases

06.09.2023

Linnaeus University is partnering with industry and healthcare to develop advanced biosensors, investing SEK 35 million in a project aimed at faster and cost-effective diagnoses of aggressive lung cancer, viral, and bacterial diseases, potentially enabling self-testing at home.
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Image: Microscopic image: cultivation of muscle stem cells and fibers from reprogrammed connective tissue cells; Copyright: ETH Zürich / Bar-Nur Lab

ETH Zürich / Bar-Nur Lab

Building muscle in the lab

23.08.2023

A new method allows large quantities of muscle stem cells to be safely obtained in cell culture.
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Image: Innovative 3D cell culture modell; Copyright: University of Nottingham

University of Nottingham

PeptiMatrix: Platform could replace use of animals in research

09.08.2023

PeptiMatrix is the latest spin-out company from the University of Nottingham, providing access to an innovative 3D cell culture platform that aims to replace the use of animals in research.
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Image: A man with dark hair and a white shirt inspects a 3D printer; Copyright: Patrick Mansell/Penn State

Patrick Mansell/Penn State

High-speed bioprinting of bones, tracheas, organs

28.07.2023

Developing technology to quickly and efficiently bioprint human tissues at scale is the goal of a new project led by Penn State researchers. When fully developed, the technology will be the first to enable the fabrication of scalable, native tissues such as bones, tracheas and organs.
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Image: Close-up of a boy with a healed minor cut after surgical tape stitches; Copyright: ellinnur

ellinnur

Biomaterials: toolbox for the development of bioadhesives

28.07.2023

The team of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel, Chair of Biomaterials at the University of Bayreuth, has compiled a current overview of the state of research on protein-based bioadhesives.
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Image: It shows the activation of a chemical signaling pathway (ERK pathway; top-right) merged with a simulation of 2D cell areas (bottom-left) in a monolayer of cells; Copyright: Hannezo Group | ISTA

Hannezo Group | ISTA

Cell dynamics: how cells talk to each other

26.07.2023

Like us, cells communicate. Well, in their own special way. Using waves as their common language, cells tell one another where and when to move.
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Image: dr Jasmina Gačanin poses for the camera in a hallway; Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

Jasmina Gačanin investigates living biomaterials

20.07.2023

Dr. Jasmina Gačanin, postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in the department of Prof. Dr. Tanja Weil, has been appointed as a “Peretti-Schmucker Fellow”.
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Image: Woman hands holding human brain over green wheat field; Copyright: Masson-Simon

Masson-Simon

Brain: a varied life boosts functional networks

18.07.2023

The findings in mice provide unprecedented insights into the complexity of large-scale neural networks and brain plasticity. Moreover, they could pave the way for new brain-inspired artificial intelligence methods.
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Image: Image showing the preparation of hydrogels that enhance the viability of NK cells; Copyright: KIMM

KIMM

3D bioprinting technology to be used for removing cancer cells

14.07.2023

KIMM develops the world’s first 3D bioprinting technology that enhances the function of NK immune cells. The new technology is expected to improve effectiveness of cancer treatment.
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Image: The monitor uses a biosensor made with nanobodies that is integrated into an air sampler that operates based on the wet cyclone technology; Copyright: Joseph Puthussery

Joseph Puthussery

Biosensing: air monitor can detect COVID-19 variants

13.07.2023

Scientists are looking at ways to surveil indoor environments in real time for viruses. By combining recent advances in aerosol sampling technology and an ultrasensitive biosensing technique, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have created a real-time monitor that can detect any of the SARS-CoV-2 virus variants in a room in about 5 minutes.
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Image: clock in the background with scattered pills in the foreground; Copyright: rawf8

rawf8

Improved cancer therapy: TimeTeller shows what makes the body tick

06.07.2023

Using the internal clock to optimize chemotherapies in cancer treatment - that is the goal of the start-up TimeTeller. If the drugs are administered at the ideal time of day for chemotherapy, it can reduce side effects and improve the effect. TimeTeller has developed a method for determining the internal clock to make this possible.
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Image: knee joint highlighted in red on which the person has placed their hands; copyright: mihacreative

mihacreative

Personalized cartilage replacement helps with knee pain

27.06.2023

Knee osteoarthritis is a widespread form of arthrosis that limits those affected in their everyday lives. The wear and tear in the cartilage tissue often causes pain and movement restrictions. In order to improve treatment, researchers have developed a process that allows artificial cartilage tissue to be individually tailored to sufferers.
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Image: Researcher Carles Mas and doctoral students Patricia López and Nerea García working with several samples as part of the Bio-TUNE project in a lab; Copyright: BarcelonaTech (UPC)

BarcelonaTech (UPC)

Medical implants: new generation of antibacterial materials

23.06.2023

The UPC’s Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group (BBT) leads the international project Bio-TUNE, which aims to develop multifunctional materials with high antibacterial potential and efficient tissue integration.
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Image: The hydrogel composite is demonstratively stretched by Alexandre Anthis; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Sensor patch for abdominal surgery

23.06.2023

Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich have developed a plaster with a sensor function to ensure that wounds in the abdomen remain tightly closed after an operation.
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Image: Micrograph of bacterial biofilms; Copyright: Buntan2019

Buntan2019

Biofilms: Infection model from the 3D printer

21.06.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) have developed a novel method to place biofilms on lung cells in the laboratory. The model system produced by means of "bioprinting" should help to better understand infection processes and assist in the development of new active substances.
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Image: Two women with loose hair and colorful blazers pose in front of an institute; Copyright: Gregor Hübl / Universität Bonn

Gregor Hübl / Universität Bonn

Researching organoids: two new Argelander Professors at the University of Bonn

21.06.2023

Two new assistant professors at the University of Bonn are setting out to develop “mini-organs” in order to study metabolic and disease mechanisms.
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Image: Renacer bioresorbable membrane against a black background; Copyright: K. Selsam, Fraunhofer ISC

K. Selsam, Fraunhofer ISC

Wound healing: Fraunhofer Institutes develop bioresorbable membrane RENACER

13.06.2023

Treating large-area and internal wounds and promoting their often protracted healing remains a challenging task for medicine. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research (ISC) and the Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine (ITEM) have developed the bioresorbable membrane RENACER®.
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Image: Magnetic nanoparticles (red) bind specifically to the spherical bacteria (yellow) which are about 1 µm in size (electron microscopy digitally colored); Copyright: Empa

Empa

Antibiotics crisis: rapid test for sepsis with nanoparticles

09.06.2023

For Qun Ren, every minute counts. The Empa researcher and her team are currently developing a diagnostic procedure that can detect life-threatening blood poisoning caused by staphylococcus bacteria rapidly. This is because staphylococcal sepsis is fatal in up to 40 percent of the cases.
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Image: Woman with glasses and gray-brown hair, Carole Planchette, stands by a pillar; Copyright: Fotogenia - Renate Trummer

Fotogenia - Renate Trummer

Tissue Engineering: TU Graz revolutionises production of biocompatible microfibres

02.06.2023

Using a newly developed method for the efficient and cost-effective production of biocompatible microfibres, the production of autologous skin and organs can be significantly accelerated. Responsible for the development are Carole Planchette and her team from TU Graz.
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Image: The cover art illustrates ultrasound-mediated drug delivery into a biofilm-infected wound; Copyright: Ella Marushchenko

Ella Marushchenko

Breaking through bacterial barriers in chronic treatment-resistant wounds

24.05.2023

Researchers in the UNC School of Medicine's Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the UNC-NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering have developed a new strategy to improve drug-delivery into chronic wounds infections.
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Image: The research team: three men and one woman pose next to a screen and a microscope; Copyright: NTU Singapore

NTU Singapore

Why wavy wounds heal faster than straight wounds

19.05.2023

Wavy wounds heal faster than straight wounds because shapes influence cell movements, a team of researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found.
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Image: Close-up of a WFIRM gyroid-shaped construct on a blue-gloved hand; Copyright: WFIRM

WFIRM

Bioprinting research makes history when it soars to the ISS

17.05.2023

The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) will make history this month when the first bioprinted solid tissue constructs soar to the International Space Station (ISS) on board the next all private astronaut mission by commercial space leader Axiom Space.
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Image: Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel and Vanessa Trossmann in a laboratory for the microscopic examination of cell structures; Copyright: UBT / Chr. Wißler.

UBT / Chr. Wißler.

Regenerative medicine: cell-specific properties of novel spider silk materials

12.05.2023

Materials made of spider silk can be specifically modified or processed in such a way that living cells of a certain type adhere to them, grow and proliferate. This has been discovered by researchers at the University of Bayreuth under the direction of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel.
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Image: Brain immune cells (“microglia”) in culture exposed to amyloid-beta proteins which are involved in Alzheimer’s disease; Copyright: DZNE/AG Milovanovic

DZNE/AG Milovanovic

Tuning brain cells with light

11.05.2023

An international research team, comprising scientists from University Hospital Bonn, DZNE, the Netherlands, and the US has been awarded a US$ 1.3 million grant by the “Human Frontier Science Program” to investigate brain immune cells and manipulate them via light irradiation.
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Image: A man in a white shirt wearing glasses - Prof. Andreas Keller, sits in his office at the computer; Copyright: Saarland University/Oliver Dietze

Universität des Saarlandes/Oliver Dietze

Exploring the molecular mechanisms of ageing

09.05.2023

A team led by bioinformatics experts Andreas Keller and Fabian Kern from Saarland University together with researchers at Stanford University have gained new insights into manifestations of ageing at the molecular level.
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Image: Three women and a man - Prof. Maria Teresa Pisabarro, Dr. Gloria Ruiz Gómez, Dr. Juliane Salbach-Hirsch and Prof. Lorenz Hofbauer; Copyright: TUD/Magdalena Gonciarz

TUD/Magdalena Gonciarz

A sweet solution to a cracking problem: new bio-inspired molecules to promote bone regeneration

08.05.2023

An interdisciplinary team of scientists in Dresden developed novel bio-inspired sugar-based molecules that show potential to improve bone regeneration.
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Image: A female physician and an assistant are looking at MRI images on a screen; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

BioDevCenter: biologicals are the future of medicine

27.04.2023

Not all advances in medical technology immediately catch your eye – take biologicals, for example. These are molecules that are biotechnologically designed for a specific application. In the German state of Baden-Württemberg, the Biologicals Development Center (BioDevCenter) and its infrastructure aim to bring them to market faster in the future.
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Image: Daniel Aili, professor at the Department of Physics, man with brown hair and glasses, smiles at the camera; Copyright: Magnus Johansson

Magnus Johansson

Wound dressing reveals infection

26.04.2023

A nanocellulose wound dressing that can reveal early signs of infection without interfering with the healing process has been developed by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden.
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Image: An example of virtual staining of tissue. Unstained tissue on the left, chemically stained tissue in the middle and virtually stained tissue on the right; Copyright: Pekka Ruusuvuori

Pekka Ruusuvuori

AI-based method to replace chemical staining of tissue

21.04.2023

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence-based method for virtual staining of histopathological tissue samples as a part of the Nordic ABCAP consortium.
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Image: A human brain organoid (red) grows on the hammock-like structure of a mesh MEA; Copyright: Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine

Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine

Microelectrode array: hammock for brain organoids

20.04.2023

Novel microelectrode array system enables long-term cultivation and electrophysiological analyses of brain organoids.
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Image: Schematic illustration of organoid bioprinting with artificial intelligence ; Copyright: Cyborg and Bionic Systems

Cyborg and Bionic Systems

Bioprinting technology and AI enable high quality in vitro models

19.04.2023

In the process of organoid manufacturing, bioprinting technology not only facilitates the creation and maintenance of complex biological 3D shapes and structures, but also allows for standardization and quality control during production.
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Image: Example image for the spatially resolved analysis of a gene on a section of kidney tissue; Copyright: Daniel Kokotek

Daniel Kokotek

New method makes rare cell types visible

13.04.2023

In cooperation with Helmholtz Munich, Professor Matthias Meier from the Centre for Biotechnology and Biomedicine at Leipzig University and his research group have developed a new, effective and comparatively inexpensive method to make rare cell types, cell communication types and disease patterns visible in tissue.
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Image: Tissue engineering, tweezers with a solution in a laboratory vessel; Copyright: Fraunhofer-Translationszentrum/Fraunhofer ISC

Fraunhofer-Translationszentrum/Fraunhofer ISC

SAPs4Tissue: human tissue models with customized biomaterials

12.04.2023

In a joint project of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, and the Translational Center for Regenerative Therapies at the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Würzburg, scientific principles and biomaterials for the standardized production of valid tissue models are to be developed.
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Image: Graphic with the headline “Nanoreactors” that show the structure of a bead with annotations; Copyright: BLINK DX

BLINK DX

BLINK DX: revolutionizing digital PCR

11.04.2023

The polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, plays a major role both in the diagnosis of infectious diseases and in research. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the term has become widely known. At MEDICA 2022, the BLINK AG from Jena, Germany, presented the BLINK Beads, a technology that is bound to revolutionize the applications of PCR.
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Image: A woman with dark hair, dark glasses and a white coat stands in front of a door frame in a laboratory and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Daniel Delang / TUM

Daniel Delang / TUM

Mini-heart in a Petri dish: organoid emulates development of the human heart

11.04.2023

The team working with Alessandra Moretti, Professor of Regenerative Medicine in Cardiovascular Disease, has developed a method for making a sort of "mini-heart" using pluripotent stem cells.
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Image: Detailed measurement of how the motor protein kinesin-1 (red) walks on microtubules (white); Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Further advance in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

16.03.2023

Scientists led by Nobel Laureate Stefan Hell at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have developed a super-resolution microscope with a spatio-temporal precision of one nanometer per millisecond.
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Image: Black cones show water molecules being oriented in the electric field at the interface with the lipid; Copyright: Carlos Marques / ENS Lyon

Carlos Marques / ENS Lyon

Standard model of electroporation refuted

15.03.2023

Technology developed at the University of Freiburg enables experimental test. The new findings could help to improve the transport of active substances into cells
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Image: Portrait of a researcher with PPE equipment analyzing brain activity; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

New artificial model validates antibodies ability to reach the brain

03.03.2023

A research group at Uppsala University has developed a simple and effective artificial blood-brain barrier model that can be used to determine how well antibody-based therapies can enter the brain.
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Image: Photograph of the semitransparent hydrogel used in this study; Copyright: Satoshi Tanikawa, et al. 2023

Satoshi Tanikawa, et al. 2023

Healing the brain: hydrogels enable neuronal tissue growth

03.03.2023

Synthetic hydrogels were shown to provide an effective scaffold for neuronal tissue growth in areas of brain damage, providing a possible approach for brain tissue reconstruction.
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Image: Pipette adding sample to stem cell cultures growing in pots for stem cell implantation; Copyright: imagesourcecurated

imagesourcecurated

Electrodes grown in the brain – paving the way for future therapies for neurological disorders

02.03.2023

The boundaries between biology and technology are becoming blurred. Researchers at Linköping, Lund, and Gothenburg universities in Sweden have successfully grown electrodes in living tissue using the body’s molecules as triggers. The result, published in the journal Science, paves the way for the formation of fully integrated electronic circuits in living organisms.
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Image: Young female scientist in protective mask and glasses examining chemical or biological sample with microscope in laboratory; Copyright: Pressmaster

Pressmaster

AI analyses cell movement under the microscope

22.02.2023

The enormous amount of data obtained by filming biological processes using a microscope has previously been an obstacle for analyses.
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Image: The use of sound waves to create a pressure field to print particles; Copyright: Kai Melde, MPI für medizinische Forschung

Kai Melde, MPI für medizinische Forschung

Creating 3D objects with sound

17.02.2023

Scientists from the Micro, Nano and Molecular Systems Lab at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research and the Institute for Molecular Systems Engineering and Advanced Materials at Heidelberg University have created a new technology to assemble matter in 3D.
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Image: Close up x-ray film of a broken finger; Copyright: Rawpixel

Rawpixel

Packaged DNA: new method to promote bone growth

17.02.2023

DNA can help to stimulate bone healing in a localised and targeted manner, for example after a complicated fracture or after severe tissue loss following surgery.
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Image: Fluorescence staining of Arlo cells. The image shows the overlay of a staining of cell nuclei (gray) and the tight junction protein 1 (blue); Copyright: HIPS/Boese

HIPS/Boese

New cell model for the human lung

16.02.2023

A team led by Prof Claus-Michael Lehr of the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) has developed a novel human lung cell line that should enable much more accurate predictions of the behavior of active substances or dosage forms in humans than previous systems.
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Image: The project team, consisting of 15 people, poses in front of a gray wall; Copyright: The Project Team / Claudia Pock

The Project Team / Claudia Pock

Multinational research consortium to advance nanomedicine manufacturing

15.02.2023

Gattefossé, InProcess-LSP, Knauer, Microfluidics, Skyepharma, and the University of Graz join the RCPE-led European Consortium for Continuous Pharmaceutical Manufacturing (ECCPM) to jointly develop a modular, flexible toolkit to advance industrial-scale production of lipid nanoparticles.
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Image: A man in a white coat and with safety goggles, Hongji Yan, holds a test tube in his hand and is looking at the camera; Copyright: Vaibhav Srivastava

Vaibhav Srivastava

Mucus-based gel improves bone graft results, promotes healing

14.02.2023

Molecules from mucus can be used to produce synthetic bone graft material and help with the healing of larger bone loss, a new study found.
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Image: A contact lens prototype that is specially designed to prevent contact lens-induced dry eye.; Copyright: Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation

Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation

Contact lenses to treat dry eye syndrome

06.02.2023

A collaborative team from the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI) has developed a contact lens prototype that is specifically designed to prevent contact lens-induced dry eye (CLIDE).
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Bild: Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

Bacterial electricity: Membrane potential influences antibiotic tolerance

27.01.2023

The electrical potential across the bacterial cell envelope indicates when bacteria no longer operate as individual cells but as a collective. Researchers at the University of Cologne's Institute for Biological Physics have discovered this connection between the electrical properties and the lifestyle of bacteria.
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Image: An elderly man sits at an eye diagnostic device and is examined by a doctor; Copyright: Beachbumledford

Beachbumledford

Controlled manufacture, storage and freezing of artificial retinal cells

25.01.2023

Fraunhofer researchers have now developed a new method for the production and clinical application of stem-cell-based retinal implants, which could contribute towards the successful treatment of AMD.
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Image: A man with brown hair in a white coat, Ángel Serrano Aroca, smiles at the camera; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Asociación RUVID

Biomaterial capable of regenerating bones and preventing infections

15.12.2022

Researchers from the Bioengineering and Biomaterials Laboratory of Universidad Católica de Valencia (UCV) have developed a new porous material capable of regenerating bones and preventing infections at the same time.
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Image: Model of a human back with a wound above the coccyx, over which a cylinder-shaped printing head hovers; Copyright: beta-web/Roth

beta-web/Roth

Wound treatment: printing instead of grafting

01.12.2022

Currently, wound care is limited to either waiting for wounds to heal while keeping them clean and free of infection or using grafts from the patient’s own body to cover larger defects. With the ongoing development tissue engineering and bioprinting, there could be a third option in future: Will we be able to print new tissue directly in the OR to cover surgical wounds?
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Image: Nurse is caring for a surgical wound at the leg of a patient; Copyright: DegrooteStock

DegrooteStock

Wound care: healing with technology

01.12.2022

Wound care by nurses is directly about cleaning, sterile covering, and documentation. Medical and surgical interventions may also be necessary. In this context, wound care also offers potential for the use of technical aids that can help prevent complications.
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Image: Nurse is cleaning a surgical wound with two sutures between the fingers of a patient; Copyright: ARTFULLY79

ARTFULLY79

Technology in wound care: tools for better healing

01.12.2022

Wounds – both acute and chronic ones – can have many different causes. They all have in common that they require meticulous care because complications in wound healing can severely reduce both the patients’ health and quality of life. But there is more to modern wound care than just cleaning and bandaging them. Nursing staff and physicians can also access technical aids for this work.
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Image: A woman with long blonde hair and black glasses smiles at the camera - Anna Rising, research group leader; Copyright: Lena Holm

Lena Holm

Scientists develop gel made from spider silk proteins for biomedical applications

19.08.2022

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have discovered that spider silk proteins can be fused to biologically active proteins and be converted into a gel at body temperature.
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Image: A person in a white t-shirt is holding an anatomical model of the kidney in front of their abdomen; Copyright: PantherMedia/benschonewille

PantherMedia/benschonewille

Technology against organ shortage – Support for the successful transplant

03.02.2022

The waiting time for a donor organ is long nowadays since the need for organs vastly exceeds their availability. But we have possibilities to improve the situation and help as many people as possible to survive despite organ failure: Some organ functions can already be substituted by technology. But medicine is also researching ways to make more organs available for transplant.
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Image: A normothermic perfusion machine; Copyright: Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Machine Perfusion: Increasing the Safety of Marginal Organ Transplants

03.01.2022

The shortage of donor organs is a major global issue. An aging population, a reluctance towards organ donation, and logistical challenges related to organ shipping play an important role in this setting. Machine perfusion can be a way to expand and preserve the donor pool for eligible transplant recipients.
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Image: Man with a bare upper-body is showing an implanted cardiac support system; Copyright: PantherMedia/NikD51

PantherMedia/NikD51

Donor organs: Solving the shortage with technology

03.01.2022

Patients waiting for a donor organ must have a lot of patience and a bit of luck. Aging and a rise in chronic disease prevalence means the need for donor organs is much greater than the number that is available. To help those who need organ transplants, scientists must create new technologies.
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Image: Image showing part of an ECMO machine – a square part through which blood is channeled; Copyright: PantherMedia/Richmanphoto

PantherMedia/Richmanphoto

COPD: How long before the implantable lung is here?

03.01.2022

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is often a last resort treatment for patients with acute respiratory failure. The method uses an external pump to circulate blood through an artificial lung back into the bloodstream. However, the use of ECMO for long-term support is not possible for patients with chronic respiratory failure.
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Image: Face and eye of a young woman in a close-up shot; Copyright: PantherMedia/Meseritsch Herby

PantherMedia/Meseritsch Herby

Implants for the senses – Hearing and seeing with technology

01.12.2021

We can replace certain functions of the body with implants nowadays, others we cannot. When it comes to the human senses, we are still quite at the beginning. The technologies and materials we can use are way to coarse compared to our nervous system. But implants can also help us to maintain senses.
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Image: lexandra Hansard, Sanjay Gokhale and George Alexandrakis; Copyright: UT Arlington

UT Arlington

Wearable device could reduce racial disparities in blood measurements

29.10.2021

Bioengineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Arlington, in collaboration with Austin’s Shani Biotechnologies, LLC, have developed a new noninvasive technology that may help real-time monitoring of key blood parameters, such as hemoglobin, especially in Black patients.
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Image: Closeup view with selective focus of shiny glittering  water balls hydrogel; Copyright: PantherMedia/PhotoChowk

PantherMedia/PhotoChowk

Improving strength, stretchiness and adhesion in hydrogels for wound healing

31.08.2021

Scientists use the adhesive capabilities of mussels as a model for optimizing hydrogels’ mechanical properties.
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Image: A physician puts a bandage around the foot of a patient; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia (YAYMicro)

PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia (YAYMicro)

Chronic wounds: new, inexpensive wound dressing

29.07.2021

An MSU-led team is developing an inexpensive biopolymer dressing to heal injuries like diabetic foot ulcers that affect millions of patients all over the world.
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Image: A man with a smartwatch on his wrist; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

Controlling insulin production with a smartwatch

15.06.2021

Many modern fitness trackers and smartwatches feature integrated LEDs. The green light emitted, whether continuous or pulsed, penetrates the skin and can be used to measure the wearer's heart rate during physical activity or while at rest.
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Image: Artist’s rendering of small robots with grapplers and searchlights that swim between red blood cells; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andreus

Autonomous medical technology: independently in the body

01.02.2021

Therapies need to be carried out with high reliability by trained personal. This will not change in the future. But maybe we will be able to let systems in the patient’s body do some of the work. Some approaches are already aiming to make implants more independent so they will be able to flexibly react to changes. Read more in our Topic of the Month!
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Image: Artist’s rendering of small star-shaped machines between red blood cells; Copyright: PantherMedia/Michael Osterrieder

Autonomous medical devices: running well in your body

01.02.2021

In theory, autonomous medical technologies can be used in a diagnostic or therapeutic capacity inside the body under certain conditions. This may not sound like a new invention at first. After all, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators have monitored and fixed abnormal heart rhythm for many years.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Tissue Engineering and Bioprinting – From artificial heart valves and printed humans

27.01.2021

Drug research and artificial skin replacement - these are the areas in which tissue engineering and bioprinting are already used today. What else could be possible in the future? We asked Dr. Nadine Nottrodt from Fraunhofer ILT and Prof. Sabine Neuß-Stein from RWTH Aachen University Hospital!
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Image: three vials, one with hydrogels, one with bio ink and one with unmodified gelatine; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGB

"Cells are highly sensitive" – material development for bioprinting

01.12.2020

The big hope of bioprinting is to someday be able to print whole human organs. So far, the process has been limited to testing platforms such as organs-on-a-chip. That's because the actual printing process already poses challenges. Scientists need suitable printing materials that ensure the cell's survival as it undergoes the procedure. The Fraunhofer IGB is researching and analyzing this aspect.
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Image: cell matrix; Copyright: TU Wien

Multi-photon lithography: printing cells with micrometer accuracy

01.12.2020

How do cells react to certain drugs? And how exactly is new tissue created? This can be analyzed by using bioprinting to embed cells in fine frameworks. However, current methods are often imprecise or too slow to process cells before they are damaged. At the TU Vienna, a high-resolution bioprinting process has now been developed using a new bio-ink.
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Image: 3D printer with a human heart inside, next to a box with

Bioprinting: life from the printer

01.12.2020

It aims at the production of test systems for drug research and gives patients on the waiting lists for donor organs hope: bioprinting. Thereby biologically functional tissues are printed. But how does that actually work? What are the different bioprinting methods? And can entire organs be printed with it? These and other questions are examined in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: A miniaturized, round sensor under a fingertip; Copyright: TU Dresden

SmartLab: all-in-one automation, digitalization, and miniaturization

01.09.2020

Laboratories have to analyze and interpret an ever-increasing number of samples for research and diagnostic services, generating lots of data in the process. At the same time, labs are required to produce quality results and operate with speed. Processes that could once be managed using laboratory notebooks and isolated systems must become smart in the future to improve lab efficiency.
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Image: medical symbols around the earth in the hands of a person; Copyright: PantherMedia/everythingposs

PantherMedia/everythingposs

Israeli medical devices showcase digital innovations at MEDICA

24.08.2020

For the annual MEDICA trade fair, companies from all over the world assemble in Düsseldorf. The Israel Export Institute has been a part of it for the last couple of years. They present medical devices and digital innovations from different Israeli companies at their joint booth.
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Image: Two knees of a woman next to each other, the left knee has a surgical suture; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wujekspeed

Regenerative medicine: creating a new body?

03.02.2020

Regenerative medicine aims to repair the human body after injuries, accidents or major cancer surgery. Unfortunately, we are still not at a stage where this process can achieve optimal results for every conceivable situation. Having said that, various new methods are on the cusp of breakthrough.
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Image: Computer-generated image of an arborizing blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ugreen

Angiogenesis: light shows blood vessels the way

03.02.2020

Regenerative medicine aims to replace damage in the body with functional tissue and restore normal function. The first defense for large defects are implants made of hydrogels, designed to promote cell growth. They need their own blood supply, which is a problem when it comes to larger implants because you cannot regulate where and how the blood vessels grow - until now.
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Image: A half-transparent red piece of tissue in a glass filled with a yellow fluid; Copyright: United Therapeutics

rhCollagen: genetically engineered building block for regenerative medicine

03.02.2020

Collagen is the stuff that holds our bodies together and that houses our cells. In regenerative medicine, it is also the stuff that can be applied to wounds to support healing. However, collagen from animal or human sources has some drawbacks for today’s medicine. This is where rhCollagen from the Israeli company CollPlant comes into play.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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