Endoprostheses: between possibility and reality
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Image: Smart contact lens with golden lines; Copyright: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2024, DOI: 10.1021/acsami.4c02289

ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2024, DOI: 10.1021/acsami.4c02289

A Step Forward in Glaucoma Diagnosis: 'Smart' Contact Lens

03.06.2024

Glaucoma remains a major cause of vision loss, affecting millions worldwide. Traditionally, diagnosing this condition early has been challenging due to the subtle changes in eye pressure that are hard to detect continuously. Researchers have now developed a 'smart' contact lens that could change how we monitor and detect this disease.
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Image: Man sitting before a monitor showing data from a microscope in the foreground while a woman in the background is looking through a microscope; Copyright: MPIKG

MPIKG

Harnessing light to control cellular dynamics

23.05.2024

Researchers led by Rumiana Dimova at the Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces have developed a technique that uses light to understand and control the inner dynamics of cells. By employing lights of different colors, they can alter the interactions within cellular components, offering a precise and non-invasive method to administer drugs directly into the cells.
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Image: A man sits on a beige sofa with yellow cushions, arms crossed and looking down

Lighting the way: Syntropic Medical's promising non-invasive depression therapy

21.05.2024

The development of non-invasive treatments for mental health disorders has become increasingly significant. One such promising advancement comes from Syntropic Medical, led by founder Mark Caffrey. The start-up uses a new kind of brain stimulation that relies on light.
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Image: Surgical instruments in a metal sieve; Copyright: Chalabala

Chalabala

Sterile supplies: AI-based recognition of surgical instruments with Cir.Log

04.04.2024

The Cir.Log project between Charité Facility Management GmbH (CFM) and Fraunhofer IPK aims to increase the efficiency of sterile processing in hospitals and improve patient safety. Essentially, the aim is to create a smooth transition from current workflows to a more efficient, technology-supported system.
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Image: There is a machine with a microscope. On the right side of the picture, there is a screen; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany

Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany

Advanced cell sorting with laser and AI

25.03.2024

The Fraunhofer Institutes for Laser Technology ILT and for Production Technology IPT developed a new AI-assisted high-throughput process that enhances cell isolation. This presents vast implications for personalized medicine, drug development, and clinical research.
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The photo shows a hand holding a silver, tubular device which improves imaging and detecting gastrointestinal cancer; Copyright: J. Crowley

J. Crowley

Imaging device for early gastrointestinal cancer detection

01.03.2024

Gastrointestinal cancers (GCs) pose a significant health challenge worldwide, with early detection being crucial for effective treatment and improved survival rates. To address this need, scientists have developed a new imaging device aimed at enhancing the accuracy and accessibility of GC screening programs.
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Image: Three colored images of skin tissue next to each other; Copyright: Nikoletta Katsouli/TUM

Nikoletta Katsouli/TUM

Diabetes: AI skin scanner detects disease progression

27.02.2024

A team from TU Munich applied the optoacoustic imaging method Raster-Scan Optoacoustic Mesoscopy (RSOM) together with AI to measure the severity of diabetes by assessing microvascular changes in the skin.
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Inage: Ferda Canbaz and her team, one woman and four men, from the Department of Biomedical Engineering; Copyright: University of Basel

University of Basel

Surgery: more accuracy and safety through smart laser technology

08.02.2024

Researchers at the University of Basel have developed a smart laser that could be used to cut bone in surgery. The laser simultaneously cuts and analyzes tissue and measures the cutting depth. It could open new applications for laser surgery in the future and make it much safer for the patient while causing less damage to surrounding soft tissue.
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Image: Close up of a contact lens being put into an eye

Contact lenses for early glaucoma detection

31.01.2024

Glaucoma affects approximately 70 million people worldwide and poses a significant threat to vision, often leading to irreversible vision loss if left untreated. Nearly half of those afflicted with this condition remain unaware of its presence. Typically progressing gradually, glaucoma often escapes early detection, making it crucial to develop new tools for its timely diagnosis and treatment.
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Image: Two people in a laboratory working with a nanoparticle paste and light. Copyright: Empa

Empa

Smart wound sealing with nanoparticles and light soldering

24.01.2024

Empa researchers have pioneered a novel soldering process that employs nanoparticles and lasers to gently fuse tissue, ushering in a new era in wound closure.
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Image: Man with black hair and dark glasses in front of a green background, Prof. Dr. Aldo Faisal; Copyright: Universität Bayreuth

Universität Bayreuth

Kulmbach Live-in Lab: holistic research on digital health

07.12.2023

The possibilities for researching human behaviour with the help of artificial intelligence are being taken to the next level in Kulmbach: The Live-in Lab there is Europe's leading laboratory for digital, AI-supported research into human behaviour in everyday life. It has now been opened.
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Image: Bone removal with laser and visual control using OCT; Copyright: LZH

LZH

Laser and OCT to facilitate spinal canal stenosis surgery

11.10.2023

Researchers at the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) aim to simplify the surgery for spinal canal stenosis.
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Image: Close up: A new wearable sensor to monitor glucose levels in sweat; Copyright: Kate Myers/Penn State

Kate Myers/Penn State

Wearable sensor for continuous analysis of sweat

06.10.2023

Continuous monitoring of sweat can reveal valuable information about human health, such as the body’s glucose levels. However, wearable sensors previously developed for this purpose have been lacking, unable to withstand the rigors or achieve the specificity needed for continuous monitoring, according to Penn State researchers.
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Image: Female engineer in laboratory clothing inspects a small circuit board; Copyright: wosunan

wosunan

Microrobots: opportunities for cancer treatment and wound healing

18.09.2023

A group of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed the world’s first microrobot (“microbot”) capable of navigating within groups of cells and stimulating individual cells.
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Image: Hands of a surgeon on the control console of a surgical robot; Copyright: Gerain0812

Gerain0812

Sensor-controlled precision: the future of surgical tumor removal

22.08.2023

The complete removal of malignant tumors is a decisive factor for the success of cancer treatment. Until now, the tissue examinations required for this have been time-consuming. In the future, sensor-based methods could come into play to help surgeons detect tumor boundaries more accurately and thus perform a more precise operation.
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Image: Immune cells in blue and vessels in pink in the bone marrow of the skull; Copyright: Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

A new ally in fighting brain diseases: our very own skull

16.08.2023

Alzheimer's, stroke, multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases cause severe damage due to neuroinflammation mediated by immune cells.
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Image:Upon irradiation by near infra-red light, Anti-PD-L1 specifically binds to the cancer cell, while immunostimulants activate T and dendritic cells; Copyright: Eijiro Miyako from JAIST

Eijiro Miyako from JAIST

Cancer photoimmunotherapy: novel liquid metal nanoparticles

10.08.2023

JAIST researchers create liquid metal nanoparticles (PEG-IMIQ-LM) for cancer treatment, merging photothermal therapy and immunotherapy. Disintegration delivers immunomodulants and tracks cancer cells in real-time. Immune checkpoint inhibitor enhances cancer removal. Promising for future cancer theranostics, with clinical trials anticipated in a decade.
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Image: Uršula Vide from the Institute of Biochemistry at TU Graz working in the lab; Copyright: TU Graz

TU Graz

Light as on-off switch for enzymes

10.08.2023

Researchers at TU Graz have gained new insights into the functioning of a protein found in bacteria, whose enzymatic activity is activated by blue light.
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Image: Images of complex brain structures. On the left these structures are difficult to see, on the right they are shown more clearly; Copyright: Johann Danzl

Johann Danzl

Brain: LIONESS enables insights into complex tissue

13.07.2023

In a new paper, an interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) has come together to present a new way to observe the brain’s structure and dynamics – in a high resolution and without damaging the tissue.
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Image: Close-up of a female eye in purple-blue futuristic design concept; Copyright: lassedesignen/Shutterstock

lassedesignen/Shutterstock

Multiple sclerosis: new biomarker for early diagnosis

12.07.2023

A study conducted by researchers from the Department of Neurology at MedUni Vienna and University Hospital Vienna has demonstrated for the first time that diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be significantly improved by additionally measuring the thickness of retinal layers in the eye.
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Image: Depiction of a brain and the nerve connections that run down the spinal cord; Copyright: joaquincorbalan

joaquincorbalan

Fiber-based endo-microscope: understanding neuronal communication

28.06.2023

A new hair-thin endo-microscope, developed by an international team with the participation of Leibniz IPHT, promises extremely gentle in-depth observations.
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Image: Viral Microscope View. 3D illustration of a corona virus in blue color; Copyright: maxxyustas

maxxyustas

Corona: The virus needs only a single door opener

15.06.2023

Why is the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus able to spread so efficiently? Various hypotheses are still circulating in the scientific community. A group of researchers from Würzburg has now found groundbreaking answers.
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Image: OR monitor that shows heart rate and other vital parameters, behind it an OR team; Copyright: bilanol

bilanol

OptoCarDi: searching for new diagnostic options to assess the heart muscle

16.05.2023

The preparations for the OptoCarDi project at the EAH Jena and the Jena University Hospital (UKJ) are in full swing. Starting in June 2023, a research team led by Prof. Iwan Schie (Biomedical Engineering), Prof. Robert Brunner (Miniaturized Optical Sensor Systems) and the cardiologists Prof. Sven Möbius-Winkler and Prof. Christian Schulze will develop an optical catheter prototype.
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Image: Brain immune cells (“microglia”) in culture exposed to amyloid-beta proteins which are involved in Alzheimer’s disease; Copyright: DZNE/AG Milovanovic

DZNE/AG Milovanovic

Tuning brain cells with light

11.05.2023

An international research team, comprising scientists from University Hospital Bonn, DZNE, the Netherlands, and the US has been awarded a US$ 1.3 million grant by the “Human Frontier Science Program” to investigate brain immune cells and manipulate them via light irradiation.
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Image: Adolescent girl is wearing sensors on her back for motion tracking; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Soft orthotics: creating the perfect fit with a 3D scanner

08.05.2023

Soft textile orthoses are used in the treatment of certain medical conditions. Making these custom devices by hand is difficult, time-consuming, and susceptible to human error. A research project has developed a digital platform designed to simplify the production of soft orthoses.
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Image: Cornel Amariei, a man with brown hair in a blue shirt, poses for the camera with white high-tech glasses; Copyright: Oana Graur

Oana Graur

Patent: high-tech glasses replace guide dog

07.04.2023

The technology of “the glasses that replace the guide dog” has just been patented in the USA. The European Union patent will follow, and it could well be introduced to the market during the course of next year.
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Image: Elderly female patient, nurse with a stethoscope listening to the heartbeat during a health consultation.; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

YuriArcursPeopleimages

Shining light on aging hearts

30.03.2023

Light therapy has demonstrated its usefulness in treating a variety of diseases. But can it delay the occurrence of age-related disease? The answer may be yes, according to a study in mice published in February in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.
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Image: The polyurethane ceiling unit equipped with four radar modules; Copyright: Fraunhofer IZM

Fraunhofer IZM

Providing care when it is needed – Radar system recognizes and tracks people and objects

27.03.2023

The researchers of Fraunhofer IZM have integrated a miniature radar system into an LED ceiling light that can track and recognize movement patterns and locate people or objects in a room.
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Image: Detailed measurement of how the motor protein kinesin-1 (red) walks on microtubules (white); Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Further advance in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

16.03.2023

Scientists led by Nobel Laureate Stefan Hell at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have developed a super-resolution microscope with a spatio-temporal precision of one nanometer per millisecond.
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Image: Two men in white laboratory clothing are working on new quantum light modules; Copyright: FBH/P. Immerz

FBH/P. Immerz

Entangled photon pairs to help fighting cancer

06.03.2023

The recently launched QEED project aims to significantly reduce measurement time in clinical cancer diagnostics by developing a spectrally resolved imaging technique based on entangled photon pairs. FBH scientists will develop the required diode lasers and quantum light modules.
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Image: A man in fine striped shirt with glasses, Prof. Dr. med. Tobias Moser, smiles at the camera; Copyright: MBExC/spförtner

MBExC/spförtner

Optical cochlea implant: ERC Proof of Concept Grant for Tobias Moser

02.03.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
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Image: Two men in dark clothes posing in front of the experimental station Alvra of the Swiss X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL; Copyright: Paul Scherrer Institut/Markus Fischer

Paul Scherrer Institut/Markus Fischer

Using light to switch drugs on and off

27.02.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
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Image: Two men and a woman stand in front of a building and smile for the camera; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

RUB, Marquard

AI with infrared imaging enables precise colon cancer diagnostics

23.02.2023

Researchers at the Centre for Protein Diagnostics PRODI at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, are using artificial intelligence in combination with infrared imaging to optimally tailor colon cancer therapy to individual patients.
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Image: Model of AR glasses that can be worn for fall prevention; Copyright:

Lorenz Assländer

Fall prevention with AR glasses

21.02.2023

Older people have a much higher risk of falls and serious injury arising from a fall. Researchers involved in the “Augmented Balance" project aim to develop augmented reality (AR) glasses to help improve balance and prevent falls.
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Image: Noninvasive intracranial pressure meter fixed to a man's head; Copyright: EPO

EPO

Low brain pressure could be a risk factor for developing glaucoma

20.02.2023

An international team of researchers led by Lithuanian scientists provide additional evidence that intracranial pressure plays an important role in normal-tension glaucoma, which accounts for up to 50 per cent of all glaucoma cases.
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Image: A closeup of a foot on red fabric pads; Copyright: CC BY-SA 2.0.

CC BY-SA 2.0.

More accurate way of checking the blood flow in the feet of patients with type 2 diabetes

15.02.2023

Aston University scientists have discovered a more accurate way of checking the blood flow in the feet of patients with type 2 diabetes.
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Image: Close-up of the healing process of a corneal ulcer, postoperative results in vivo; Copyright: POSTECH

POSTECH

Treating cornea ulcers with diagnostic light instead of corneal transplantation

08.02.2023

Recently, a Korean joint research team from POSTECH-KKU has developed a new tissue adhesive that restores the damaged cornea by simply filling it and exposing it to light.
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Image: A woman with black hair in a white coat sits in a research laboratory and operates a microscope; Copyright: wichayada69

wichayada69

Funding to produce biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials

08.02.2023

A new junior research group at Freie Universität Berlin, which will investigate the production of biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials, with one of the goals of synthesis being new alternatives to conventional antibiotics, will receive a total budget of more than 1.8 million euros from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) over the next five years.
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Image: During their journey through the blood, blood proteins accumulate on the surface of nanoparticles. 3D illustration; Copyright: MPI-P

MPI-P

New insights into the utilization of nanotechnology-based drugs

01.02.2023

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now followed the path of such a particle into a cell using a combination of several microscopy methods. They were able to observe a cell-internal process that effectively separates blood components and nanoparticles.
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Image: An Illustration of the microelectronic fibers fabricated by the thermal drawing process and its fabrics for sweat sensing.; Copyright: Tohoku University

Tohoku University

Analyzing sweat via microelectronic fibers for non-invasive health monitoring

25.01.2023

Imagine if a t-shirt could analyze sweat, potentially alerting the wearer to any health abnormalities. Well, this is now closer to reality thanks to a research group's recent innovation.
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Image: Position of molecules on nanoparticle surfaces as a 3D illustration; Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

How optical microscopes allow detailed investigations of nanoparticles

06.01.2023

In their project "Supercol"- funded by the European Union - scientists want to achieve the investigation of nanoparticles with light.
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Image: A woman in a white coat with blue gloves sits at a large microscope; Copyright: LZH

LZH

Detecting bacterial infestation fast, contactless, and free of markers

05.01.2023

With a multimodal microscope, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and three partners in the joint project PriMe want to make it possible to detect bacterial infestation using fast, marker-free, and contactless imaging.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Home for medical technology – Highlight tour at the joint stand of NRW

16.11.2022

North Rhine-Westphalia offers good conditions as a location for medical technology companies. We spoke to Refined Laser Systems GmbH, United Robotics Group GmbH and weLLgo Medical Products GmbH during our tour of the NRW joint stand in Hall 3 / C80.
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What intensive care patients really need – Communication via eye-tracking systems

07.04.2022

Patients at the intensive care unit are not always able to communicate with their environment, even if they are conscious. The BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil in Bochum, Germany, now aims to enable them to communicate using an eye-tracking system. Learn in our video interview how this system works, how it was established and what obstacles still need to be overcome.
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Mysterious patterns – Infrared thermography for sports medicine performance diagnostics

07.01.2022

Using a high-resolution infrared camera, sports scientists from the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have discovered how blood flow in the human skin changes during exercise. They now want to exactly quantify these changes with machine vision and thus gain knowledge for performance diagnostics and beyond.
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Image: Illustration of the way an optical Cochlear implant functions; Copyright: UMG

UMG

Cochlear implants: Using light to improve hearing

01.12.2021

Cochlear implants are devices that partially restore hearing in wearers. Unfortunately, the signal transmission from the implant to the auditory nerve is still rather basic, thus limiting the sound quality. Future implants could be more accurate in this setting by using light versus electrical pulses to stimulate nerve cells in the ear.
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Digital and automated laboratory – Robots as multifunctional helpers

26.11.2021

A lot of laboratory tasks require high precision on one hand, on the other they tend to be repetitive and tiring. While humans can only work for a limited time here while staying effective, robots are able to work without taking a break. The start-up bAhead wants to make collaborative robots, CoBots, adaptable helpers with the help of AI. We learn more from CEO & Founder Rainer Treptow.
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Digitalization in orthopedic technology – A craft is changing

22.11.2021

Orthopedic auxiliary means are mostly still produced in manual labor today. But orthopedic technology is also trying out new ways by using tools like 3D scanners, digital models and 3D printing. Nadja Singer from Ottobock explains in our video interview how this changes the production of auxiliary means.
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Image: lexandra Hansard, Sanjay Gokhale and George Alexandrakis; Copyright: UT Arlington

UT Arlington

Wearable device could reduce racial disparities in blood measurements

29.10.2021

Bioengineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Arlington, in collaboration with Austin’s Shani Biotechnologies, LLC, have developed a new noninvasive technology that may help real-time monitoring of key blood parameters, such as hemoglobin, especially in Black patients.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Machine Vision – The new navigation for spine surgery

15.09.2021

Precise, extremely quick and accurate – a new kind of navigation device in the OR uses a highly-developed camera technology to guide the surgeon through difficult procedures – directly in the OR. Prof. Ulf Liljenqvist, Chief Medical Director of the Clinic for Spinal Surgery at the St. Franziskus Hospital Münster, talks about his experiences in using the device.
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Image: X-ray image of a blood vessel with a catheter and a balloon; Copyright: PantherMedia/pitchayanank.hotmail.com

A look into the cardiovascular system: Possibilities of medical imaging

02.08.2021

A high degree of precision is required for operations involving the cardiovascular system. This is based on medical imaging. In practice, however, these still face a number of challenges that can impair image quality. The further development of imaging techniques represents a forward-looking field of research in order to be able to improve surgical treatment.
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Image: Blood vessels and nerve tracts of a mouse; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

SWIR Imaging: The Power of Multi-Color Real-Time Technology

02.08.2021

Image-guided surgery is based on medical imaging. However, past imaging technologies performed while the patient is awake cannot deliver a complete view that facilitates a visual differentiation of structures such as blood vessels and nerve tracts. In a study, scientists developed a non-invasive imaging modality that enables multiplexing, deep tissue penetration, and real-time resolution.
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Image: Two men in white shirs - Kazuki Takahashi, Manabu Tokeshi; Copyright: Manabu Tokeshi

Manabu Tokeshi

SARS-CoV-2: rapid method to quantify antibodies

29.07.2021

Scientists have developed a rapid, highly accurate test to detect antibodies against the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in human serum, opening a new avenue for understanding the full extent of the pandemic and evaluating the effectiveness of vaccines.
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Image: A young boy is sitting in front of a computer, looking at a 3D scan of his head; Copyright: Artec 3D

Orthopedic technology: 3D scanners change the industry

01.07.2021

Orthopedic technology involves taking a measurement of a specific body part and then creating a medical device, be it prosthesis or orthosis, that fits. While optical scanners are already used for some of these measurements, others are still performed through manual labor and craft to create molds of the body. 3D scanners are changing this.
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Image: A man with a smartwatch on his wrist; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

Controlling insulin production with a smartwatch

15.06.2021

Many modern fitness trackers and smartwatches feature integrated LEDs. The green light emitted, whether continuous or pulsed, penetrates the skin and can be used to measure the wearer's heart rate during physical activity or while at rest.
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Image: A woman sitting in front of a device for an eye examination; Copyright: PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

Alzheimer's disease: early detection using an eye exam

22.03.2021

Alzheimer's disease is still incurable, but if detected early enough, countermeasures can improve treatment and slow the progression. Unfortunately, there is still no reliable early detection test at this juncture. This might soon change thanks to a non-invasive spectroscopy of the retina.
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Image: A group of researchers is discussing a chemical structural formula in front of a whiteboard; Copyright: PantherMedia/depositedhar

Intelligent implants: when the material is the key to the solution

01.02.2021

Today we use implants to stabilize or compensate for injuries inside the body and to aid in the healing process. Implants cannot act autonomously and treat the patient if they deem it necessary. However, it is just a matter of time before this happens because research on intelligent implant materials that respond to stimuli is on the cusp of a breakthrough.
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Image: A young laboratory technician with AR glasses uses a pipette, he is surrounded by different bubbles with text; Copyright: Helbling Technik Wil AG

Augmented Reality for better laboratory results

01.09.2020

Accuracy is paramount in laboratory settings and ensures that lab results are valid. Errors in a lab can render series of tests unusable and waste precious time and money. In the medical realm, this might even result in clinical trial errors. Augmented reality (AR) can help laboratory technicians to prevent errors and guide their work in the future.
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Image: Application of AR sonography; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGD

Fraunhofer IGD

Augmented reality ultrasound: putting the focus on patients

10.08.2020

This is how a conventional ultrasound scan works: patients lie down on a table next to the ultrasound machine. A doctor uses a probe to scan the part of the body in question, while he or she looks at the pictures on a monitor. In other words, the physician either focuses on his/her hand on the patient or the monitor. The Fraunhofer IGD wants to change this process as part of the "sonAR" project.
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Image: Intensive care unit with VitalSky installation over two beds; Copyright: Markus van Offern

VitalSky: how an artificial sky improves ICU patient recovery

03.08.2020

Delirium occurs in 30 to 80 percent of patients in intensive care units. This cerebral impairment not only causes mental confusion and emotional disruption but also drastically increases the mortality risk of patients. A controlled circadian rhythm and sleep/wake cycle is the prerequisite for delirium prevention. This is where the new VitalMinds concept from Philips comes in.
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Image: Person with VR glasses in a room; Copyright: EXXETA AG

EXXETA AG

Gamification: facilitating a gradual return-to-play

08.06.2020

Professional athletes depend on a speedy recovery from sports injuries or surgery because their livelihood depends on their physical fitness. Returning to competition too soon after injury can have negative health consequences. Standard tests are now combined with virtual reality to determine the optimal time to return to play.
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02.06.2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: Computer-generated image of an arborizing blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ugreen

Angiogenesis: light shows blood vessels the way

03.02.2020

Regenerative medicine aims to replace damage in the body with functional tissue and restore normal function. The first defense for large defects are implants made of hydrogels, designed to promote cell growth. They need their own blood supply, which is a problem when it comes to larger implants because you cannot regulate where and how the blood vessels grow - until now.
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Image: Endoscope capsule (left) next to an endoscope tube (right); Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

panthermedia.net/phonlamai

A new type of endoscopy – small, easy, comfortable

22.01.2020

Patients have to undergo a gastroscopy to rule out gastrointestinal conditions. Many dread this procedure since a thin, flexible tube is being pushed through the esophagus and stomach. Ovesco Endoscopy AG has teamed up with other project partners in the nuEndo research project to develop a capsule endoscopy device that is tiny, easy to swallow and makes the test more comfortable for the patient.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprostheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprostheses: between possibility and reality

01.01.2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprostheses. Endoprostheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprostheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: Two screens with picture of the circulatory system in a catheter laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

MEDICA TECH FORUM: light-based imaging technique OCT

04.11.2019

Since its inception, MEDICA TECH FORUM has focused on the implementation of innovations and new technologies into clinical practice. 2019 marks the tenth year of the Forum. In honor of its anniversary, we will brighten things up a bit, as one of the focal points will highlight how optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light to produce images.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08.10.2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08.08.2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01.08.2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Functional Imaging: The puls of modern oncology

17.06.2019

Medical imaging techniques have developed considerably in recent decades. In addition to morphological imaging techniques more and more functional imaging techniques are used in oncology that can continously record the functions of specific organs locally and regionally in real time. These are groundbreaking for diagnostics, therapies and preoperative preparations.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23.04.2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01.04.2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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Image: Dosage inhaler and stethoscope in front of a shelf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/liudmilachernetska@gmail.com

React early, breathe free – comprehensive COPD management

01.03.2019

COPD is considered the third most common cause of death worldwide and mainly affects smokers. It is not curable, but with the right combination of early diagnosis, therapy and self-management, a significant part of the quality of life can be regained. The comprehensive care is supported by various devices and technical tools. Learn more about the all-round care of COPD in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01.03.2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01.03.2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

Where imaging and radiation meet – Radiotherapy with the MR-Linac

13.02.2019

In conventional radiotherapy, the tumor is first localized using CT and MRT images in order to calculate the irradiated areas. The major drawback in this case: the subsequent radiation only shows bone structures in the body but not the tumor itself. As a result, the radiated area is often larger than necessary. In our video you will learn how the MR-Linac can be used for more precise radiotherapy.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01.02.2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02.01.2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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