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Image: An operating room with a surgery in process; Copyright: Joe Carrotta for NYU Langone Health

Joe Carrotta for NYU Langone Health

Breakthrough transplant surgery: Heart pump and gene-edited pig kidney combined

21.05.2024

NYU Langone Health has achieved a medical milestone with the first-ever combined mechanical heart pump and gene-edited pig kidney transplant surgery.
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Image: In the foreground, there is a golden chip, which is used for the analysis, held by two fingers. The background is black. Copyright: David Baillot/University of California San Diego

David Baillot/University of California San Diego

Faster and more accurate pathogen detection through DNA melting

05.03.2024

Unlike conventional blood cultures, which can take anywhere from 15 hours to several days to yield results, the new digital DNA melting analysis delivers actionable insights in under six hours. This accelerated turnaround time enables clinicians to initiate targeted treatment strategies promptly, minimizing the risk of disease progression and improving patient outcomes.
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Image: Private lecturer Dr. Jonas Schupp sits next to a microscope and smiles for the camera; Copyright: privat

privat

Chronic lung diseases: funding for precision medicine

20.12.2023

Associate Professor Dr Jonas Schupp receives funding for his research into chronic lung diseases.
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Image: Man with long hair and olive green sweater posing: Kristian Franze with brain model; Copyright: Stephan Spangenberg

Stephan Spangenberg

UNFOLD research project receives prestigious ERC Synergy Grant

01.11.2023

Physicist and veterinarian Prof. Dr. Kristian Franze, Director at the Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin (MPZPM) and Director of the Institute for Medical Physics and Microtissue Engineering at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), has been awarded an ERC Synergy Grant.
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Image: Diagram of synapse formation: Glowing protein shows the development of synaptic vesicles; Copyright: Barth van Rossum, FMP

Barth van Rossum, FMP

Microscopy and fluorescence show how synapses are formed

23.10.2023

How are synapses formed, those points of contact that allow the transmission of information from one neuron to the other? Working with an international team, researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have now uncovered a crucial mechanism and elucidated the identity of the axonal transport vesicles that generates synapses.
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Image: Two men stand in a server room and look into the camera equipped with a fisheye lens; Copyright: Linköping University

Linköping University

A step towards AI-based precision medicine

19.10.2023

Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have developed an AI-based method applicable to various medical and biological issues. Their models can for instance accurately estimate people’s chronological age and determine whether they have been smokers or not.
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Image: The MinION device connected to a computer. The screen shows data from the evaluation; Copyright: Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore

Nanopore sequencing and DNA barcoding method gives hope of personalised medicine

03.10.2023

With the ability to map dozens of biomarkers at once, a new method could transform testing for conditions including heart disease and cancer.
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Image: Microscopy image and artistic representation of the CHOOSE system in a human brain organoid; Copyright: Knoblich Lab / IMBA-IMP Graphics

Knoblich Lab / IMBA-IMP Graphics

Autism: brain organoid shows genetic bases

21.09.2023

Technology, developed by researchers from the Knoblich group at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Treutlein group at ETH Zurich, permits the identification of vulnerable cell types and gene regulatory networks that underlie autism spectrum disorders.
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Image: Laboratory worker holds a test tube with blood samples in his hands, test tubes with biomaterial; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

New blood marker can identify parkinsonian diseases

20.09.2023

Is it possible that a single biomarker can detect all types of diseases related to dopamine deficiency in the brain? Yes, that's what a research group in Lund is discovering.
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Image: Half-bald man with glasses in a dark jacket stands in the sunshine and smiles into the camera; Copyright: Ryan Hull

Ryan Hull

Pathogen detection through electronic detection of DNA nanoballs

19.09.2023

Researchers at Karolinska Institute have developed a novel method using DNA Nanoballs to detect pathogens, aiming to simplify nucleic acid testing and revolutionize pathogen detection.
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Image: Close-up of two hands in blue gloves preparing a dose of vaccine by syringe; Copyright: Beate Armbruster/University Hospital of Tuebingen

Beate Armbruster/University Hospital of Tuebingen

Protection for cancer patients

05.09.2023

Tübingen T-cell activator offers protection against coronaviruses in immunocompromised patients
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Image: The team at the Institute of PharmaceuticalMicrobiology: Three women and a man in white coats smile for the camera; Copyright: Gregor Hübl/University of Bonn

Gregor Hübl/University of Bonn

Researchers decode new antibiotic

29.08.2023

Cooperation between the University of Bonn, the USA and the Netherlands cracks the mode of action of clovibactin
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Image: Close-up of microtiter plates that are filled with several pipettes; Copyright: LMU

LMU

Immunotherapy: Antibody kit to fight tumors

25.08.2023

A new study highlights the potential of artificial DNA structures that, when fitted with antibodies, instruct the immune system to specifically target cancerous cells.
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Image: Healthy food. Fresh vegetables, fruits, meat and fish on the table. View from above; Copyright: LanaSweet

LanaSweet

Research gives new insights into fighting antimicrobial resistance

25.08.2023

Cooking food thoroughly and avoiding some types of vegetables and salad during a course of antibiotic treatment could potentially reduce antibiotic resistance, by preventing bacteria carrying resistance genes getting into the gut, according to a new study.
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Image: Judit Burgaya and Prof. Dr. Marco Galardini in the TWINCORE at a bar table with a laptop; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

How harmless turns dangerous

24.08.2023

MHH researcher Prof. Galardini from the RESIST Cluster of Excellence finds causes for bloodstream infections in the genes of bacteria. This will enable better diagnostics and vaccinations in the future.
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Image: Diagram of a fully synthetic cell-instructive matrix with programmable mechanical properties; Copyright: Elisha Krieg und Yu-Hsuan Peng

Elisha Krieg und Yu-Hsuan Peng

Programmable DNA hydrogels for advanced cell culture and personalized medicine

22.08.2023

The team of Dr. Elisha Krieg at the Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden has developed a dynamic DNA-crosslinked matrix (DyNAtrix) by combining classical synthetic polymers with programmable DNA crosslinkers.
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Image: Woman with brown hair in black blazer and white top, Bruna Gigante, poses for the camera; Copyright: European Society of Cardiology

European Society of Cardiology

AI and precision medicine may discover risk of cardiovascular disease

31.07.2023

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, among others, have now found that artificial intelligence seems to play a role in identifying the risk of cardiovascular disease.
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Image: A stethoscope against a background of lined up ones and zeros, colored blue-purple; Copyright: istock.com/viorika

istock.com/viorika

AI brings hope for children with lyosomal storage disease

20.07.2023

Artificial intelligence is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery. Advances in the use of Big Data, learning algorithms and powerful computers have now enabled researchers at the University of Zurich (UZH) to better understand a serious metabolic disease.
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Image: Child being tested for viruses in the throat by a doctor using a test swab; Copyright: drazenphoto

drazenphoto

Revolutionizing virus detection: the power of AI and CRISPR

04.07.2023

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists and researchers have been tirelessly working to develop innovative and accurate tests to identify the presence of viruses. One breakthrough technology that has emerged is the combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and CRISPR, which has revolutionized virus detection.
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Image: Man with short brown hair, glasses and a blue shirt, Prof. Thomas Klockgether, smiles at the camera; Copyright: University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

Ataxias: international award for Bonn patient care and research

28.06.2023

The Ataxia Center at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and DZNE have been awarded the title “Ataxia Center of Excellence” by the US National Ataxia Foundation (NAF) for their patient care and research – as the only organization in Europe.
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Image: A female lab worker puts a sample vial with blood from a rack into a centrifuge; Copyright: seventyfourimages

seventyfourimages

Blood biomarkers plus genomics in the prediction of disease risk

16.06.2023

Being to identify people at high risk of chronic disease means that they can be targeted with prevention measures before they become sick. Polygenic risk scores, where genomic information alone is used to assess the risk of developing diseases, have been receiving a lot of attention recently.
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Image: Colored image of cortical tissue; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

MRI shows new altered neural circuits in Huntington's disease

16.06.2023

Huntington’s disease is a genetically-based neurodegenerative disorder that causes motor, cognitive and psychiatric disorders in the affected individuals. Understanding the alterations in the neural circuits in this disorder is essential in order to design therapeutic approaches.
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Image: Device for scanning and diagnostic viewing of patients; Copyright: mstandret

mstandret

AI in eye scans: improved diagnosis of inherited disease of the retina

14.06.2023

Researchers from the UK and Germany have used artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a system that they believe will enable more widespread provision of testing, together with improved efficiency.
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Image: Red 3D illustration of a human lungs on a black background; Copyright: Pixabay

Pixabay

Lung: bacterial colonisation also depends on genes of the host

13.06.2023

We know from previous studies that changes in the lung microbiome are associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Environmental factors such as smoking, nutrition in infancy or the use of antibiotics are important factors for the composition and stability of the microbial community in the lung.
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Image: Nils Wagner, a man with brown hair in a T-shirt, sits at a computer screen on which codes are displayed; Copyright: Dennis Gankin / TUM

Dennis Gankin / TUM

Algorithm helps search for the cause of hereditary diseases

07.06.2023

A Munich research team has developed an algorithm that predicts the effects of genetic mutations on RNA formation six times more precisely than previous models.
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Image: A man in a gray jacket and white shirt, Miroslaw Bober, smiles at the camera; Copyright: University of Surrey

University of Surrey

UK AI world leader in identifying location and expression of proteins

18.05.2023

A new advanced artificial intelligence (AI) system has shown world-leading accuracy and speed in identifying protein patterns within individual cells.
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Image: The experts Luis Miguel Echeverry and Neus Martínez-Abadías at the Faculty of Biology of the UB; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

Rare disease diagnosis: AI algorithms do not include human diversity

17.05.2023

Most of the AI-generated algorithms have databases with populations of European origins and they ignore the genetic and morphological diversity of human populations of around the world.
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Image: Brain immune cells (“microglia”) in culture exposed to amyloid-beta proteins which are involved in Alzheimer’s disease; Copyright: DZNE/AG Milovanovic

DZNE/AG Milovanovic

Tuning brain cells with light

11.05.2023

An international research team, comprising scientists from University Hospital Bonn, DZNE, the Netherlands, and the US has been awarded a US$ 1.3 million grant by the “Human Frontier Science Program” to investigate brain immune cells and manipulate them via light irradiation.
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Image: A man in a white shirt wearing glasses - Prof. Andreas Keller, sits in his office at the computer; Copyright: Saarland University/Oliver Dietze

Universität des Saarlandes/Oliver Dietze

Exploring the molecular mechanisms of ageing

09.05.2023

A team led by bioinformatics experts Andreas Keller and Fabian Kern from Saarland University together with researchers at Stanford University have gained new insights into manifestations of ageing at the molecular level.
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Image: Close-up of doctor pointing at human pelvic skeleton model in medical clinic.; Copyright: Okrasyuk

Okrasyuk

Map of spinal cord formation gives new knowledge on diseases of the nervous system

03.05.2023

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have mapped how cells in the human spinal cord are formed in the embryo and what genes control the process.
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Image: 3D render of the tibias treated with the current clinical treatment option chemotherapeutics or treated with chemotherapeutics plus gene therapy; Copyright: UCD Research and Innovation

UCD Research and Innovation

Novel combination of therapies may provide new treatment option for bone cancer

03.05.2023

New research has identified a potential therapeutic target and developed a unique delivery system to treat osteosarcoma, a bone cancer that primarily affects children and adolescents.
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Image: Screenshot from the DeMAG webserver. DeMAG predicts benign mutations in light blue and pathogenic ones in coral; Copyright: Agnes Toth-Petroczy, Nature Communications

Agnes Toth-Petroczy, Nature Communications

New tool facilitates clinical interpretation of genetic information

27.04.2023

Max Planck and Harvard research teams develop DeMAG, a new method shared as an open-source web server (demag.org) to help interpret mutations in disease genes and improve clinical decision-making.
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Image: Example image for the spatially resolved analysis of a gene on a section of kidney tissue; Copyright: Daniel Kokotek

Daniel Kokotek

New method makes rare cell types visible

13.04.2023

In cooperation with Helmholtz Munich, Professor Matthias Meier from the Centre for Biotechnology and Biomedicine at Leipzig University and his research group have developed a new, effective and comparatively inexpensive method to make rare cell types, cell communication types and disease patterns visible in tissue.
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Image: Elderly female patient, nurse with a stethoscope listening to the heartbeat during a health consultation.; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

YuriArcursPeopleimages

Shining light on aging hearts

30.03.2023

Light therapy has demonstrated its usefulness in treating a variety of diseases. But can it delay the occurrence of age-related disease? The answer may be yes, according to a study in mice published in February in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.
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Image: Close-up of a sample tray and analyzer in the laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPK / Larissa Klassen

Fraunhofer IPK / Larissa Klassen

New technologies for producing mRNA-based pharmaceuticals

24.03.2023

Together with partners from science and industry, Fraunhofer IPK is researching how mRNA therapeutics and other medication can be better produced and more effectively applied.
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Image: A man in a blue shirt, Professor Dr Alexander Schönhuth, standing next to a wall and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Bielefeld University/Sarah Jonek

Bielefeld University/Sarah Jonek

Predicting outbreak of ALS disease with AI methods

08.03.2023

Using artificial intelligence (AI) methods, researchers led by Professor Dr Alexander Schönhuth from Bielefeld University’s Faculty of Technology have succeeded in recording and deciphering the genotype profiles of 3,000 ALS patients and thus learning more about the development of the disease.
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Image: A man in fine striped shirt with glasses, Prof. Dr. med. Tobias Moser, smiles at the camera; Copyright: MBExC/spförtner

MBExC/spförtner

Optical cochlea implant: ERC Proof of Concept Grant for Tobias Moser

02.03.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
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Image: The photo shows the scanning of a blood sample in a laboratory at CiiM.; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

What leads to severe COVID-19 diseases?

01.03.2023

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 leads to severe disease in some people, while others do not get ill or only experience mild disease. But why is this the case? Unfortunately, we do not know exactly. We do know that an overactive innate immune system is causing severe COVID-19 disease, but it is unclear how this is regulated.
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Image: Close up x-ray film of a broken finger; Copyright: Rawpixel

Rawpixel

Packaged DNA: new method to promote bone growth

17.02.2023

DNA can help to stimulate bone healing in a localised and targeted manner, for example after a complicated fracture or after severe tissue loss following surgery.
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Image: Woman with ruptured blood vessel in eye, closeup; Copyright: amenic181

amenic181

AI finds twisting of eye vessels could cause high blood pressure and heart disease

16.02.2023

Research led by scientists at St George’s, University of London has discovered 119 areas in the genome that help to determine the size and shape of blood vessels at the back of the eye, and that an increase in ‘twisting’ of the arteries could cause high blood pressure and heart disease.
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Image: Fluorescence staining of Arlo cells. The image shows the overlay of a staining of cell nuclei (gray) and the tight junction protein 1 (blue); Copyright: HIPS/Boese

HIPS/Boese

New cell model for the human lung

16.02.2023

A team led by Prof Claus-Michael Lehr of the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) has developed a novel human lung cell line that should enable much more accurate predictions of the behavior of active substances or dosage forms in humans than previous systems.
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Image: Illustration of the nanomaterial graphene with gold nano disks array; Copyright: NTNU

NTNU

Super quick COVID test uses new technology

13.02.2023

The ability of gold particles to reflect light in different colours is used in applications from stained glass to pregnancy tests. Now researchers are set to exploit the same properties in an ultra-fast sensor for the coronavirus.
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Bild: DNA strand assembly from different elements. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

The architecture of shattered genomes

27.01.2023

Hunting for disease clues in the dark matter of our DNA. Scientists have reconstructed the chromosomes of patients with an extremely high number of aberrations in their genome that could alter the expression of nearby genes and potentially cause disease. Their results were published in Nature Communications in October 2022.
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Image: Dr Anke Katharina Bergmann in a white coat, holding a tablet, is standing in front of a virtual map of Europe; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH, Freepik.com

Karin Kaiser / MHH, Freepik.com

MHH leads EU large-scale project for personalized cancer care

26.01.2023

CAN.HEAL aims to expand the available innovations in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment in the Member States in order to improve care for all patients in the EU. The project focuses on measures of personalized medicine. Genomics is an important cornerstone for this.
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Image: Researcher examines cell culture plates under the microscope; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

Analyzing disease progression and cell processes with TIGER: in vivo and non-invasively

18.01.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) and the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) in Würzburg have developed a technology they call TIGER. It allows complex processes in individual cells to be deciphered in vivo by recording past RNA transcripts.
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Image: Two doctors in scrubs look at a screen during an AI-assisted colonoscopy; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB)

Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB)

AI improves colorectal cancer screening in Lynch syndrome

10.01.2023

Researchers at the National Center for Hereditary Tumor Diseases (NZET) at Bonn University Hospital (UKB) have now found that artificial intelligence (AI) can improve the effectiveness of colonoscopy in the presence of Lynch syndrome.
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Image: Doctor and medical assistant at the bedside of a patient who has breathing problems and is wearing an oxygen mask; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Why some people get a more severe COVID-19 progression than others

22.08.2022

A team of scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) together with colleagues from the United Kingdom and Canada have found genes and proteins that contribute to a higher risk of severe COVID-19.
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Image: Two men are sitting in front of a laptop computer and are talking about an image on the screen - Josch Konstantin Pauling, Nikolai Köhler; Copytight: LipiTUM

LipiTUM

MoSBi: Algorithm identifies disease subtypes

01.08.2022

Doctors have always used symptoms, imaging, and laboratory data to define and diagnose diseases, but at times it is simply not enough: while patients may have the same illness, it may exhibit different changes at the molecular level. A team from the Technical University of Munich has developed the so-called MoSBi algorithm and makes it available to researchers to identify molecular differences.
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Image: Two drops of water on a screen that shows a pattern of colored bars; Copyright: ktsimage

ktsimage

Big Data in genetics: reaching diagnosis through heaps of data

01.08.2022

Most laboratory tests only produce small amounts of data that are already sufficient for successful diagnosis. It becomes more difficult with genetic questions: whether it is about a genetic disease or the properties of tumors, there are large amounts of data that must be considered. Both research and medicine need help to identify the connections and patterns in the data to find a diagnosis.
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Image: Gloved hand holds a cell culturing vessel in front of a screen with the depiction of a genetic analysis; Copyright: westend61

westend61

Big Data: Helper and game changer in laboratory medicine and genetics

01.08.2022

Big data, the use of large volumes of data in diagnostics and research, is giving medical science a powerful boost. Especially in laboratory medicine, big data can provide unprecedented support as doctors must consider a multitude of data and parameters to facilitate accurate medical decision-making.
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Image: Two male researchers analyzing data sets on a computer screen; Copyright: Felix Petermann | MDC

Felix Petermann | MDC

Project "ikarus" provides new insights for cancer research

01.08.2022

Artificial intelligence (AI) is about to become a game changer, especially in diagnostics. However, there are still limits to the use of AI. Dr. Altuna Akalin had to recognize this as well. The head of the Max Delbrück Center's (MDC) technology platform for "Bioinformatics and Omics Data Science" developed "ikarus" with his team.
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Image: Portable genomics device; Copyright: Philippine Genome Center Mindanao

Philippine Genome Center Mindanao

SARS-CoV-2: portable sequencing platform for developing countries

02.09.2021

Philippine Genome Center Mindanao (PGC Mindanao) has partnered with Accessible Genomics, a group of volunteering scientists from all around the world to implement a low start-up cost genomic sequencing platform for laboratories in developing countries.
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Image: Scientist with pipette in laboratory ; Copyright: PantherMedia/alexraths

PantherMedia/lucadp

Genetic test better than blood test for cardiovascular diseases

31.08.2021

Determining an individual’s blood group based on genetic tests instead of merely traditional blood tests can provide a better picture of the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
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Image: Two men in white shirs - Kazuki Takahashi, Manabu Tokeshi; Copyright: Manabu Tokeshi

Manabu Tokeshi

SARS-CoV-2: rapid method to quantify antibodies

29.07.2021

Scientists have developed a rapid, highly accurate test to detect antibodies against the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in human serum, opening a new avenue for understanding the full extent of the pandemic and evaluating the effectiveness of vaccines.
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Image: A man with a smartwatch on his wrist; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

Controlling insulin production with a smartwatch

15.06.2021

Many modern fitness trackers and smartwatches feature integrated LEDs. The green light emitted, whether continuous or pulsed, penetrates the skin and can be used to measure the wearer's heart rate during physical activity or while at rest.
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Image: A half-transparent red piece of tissue in a glass filled with a yellow fluid; Copyright: United Therapeutics

rhCollagen: genetically engineered building block for regenerative medicine

03.02.2020

Collagen is the stuff that holds our bodies together and that houses our cells. In regenerative medicine, it is also the stuff that can be applied to wounds to support healing. However, collagen from animal or human sources has some drawbacks for today’s medicine. This is where rhCollagen from the Israeli company CollPlant comes into play.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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