MEDICA START-UP PARK: Experience innovations today

Image: Oncologist looking at patients x-ray photos and making notes in red notebook; Copyright: sofiiashunkina

sofiiashunkina

Complete package for minimally invasive tumor therapy

04.01.2023

License agreement and joint development: Fraunhofer MEVIS commences cooperation with Israeli partner for worldwide use of innovative software technology in ultrasound-aided tumor ablation.
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The artificial eye – imaging and AI

15.11.2022

Four eyes see more than two – but do artificial eyes also see more than real ones? In any case, radiologists will increasingly rely on the support of algorithms in the future. These programs do not tire, even when looking at countless images. At MEDICA 2022, we met companies that already rely on AI in imaging.
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Image: scanning electron microscope image of red blood cells in the blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized treatment of acute stroke: diagnostics with 3D virtual histology

23.08.2022

Every minute counts when someone is having an acute stroke. If the cause is a vascular blockage caused by a blood clot (thrombus) in the brain, detailed insights into the thrombus composition is critical to remove or dissolve it successfully and help restore blood flow. But that’s often easier said than done when "time is brain".
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Image: CT scan of the abdomen with two red markers; Copyright: PantherMedia/stockdevil_666

PantherMedia/stockdevil_666

Computed tomography: Digital signals with photon-counting CT

01.02.2022

Does medicine get digital when we scan in diagnostic findings and digitize them in the process? It obviously is more efficient to record data directly in digital form, but not all diagnostic tools have this option. Computed tomography has now made enormous progress in this area: Unlike conventional CT technology, the new photon-counting CT directly creates digital image data.
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Image: Professor Dr. Danny Jonigk and Christopher Werlein; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

New X-ray technique shows vascular damage in intact COVID-19 lungs for first time

05.11.2021

When the coronavirus enters the lung, it causes massive tissue damage. Now, an international research team has been able to demonstrate for the first time, using a highly innovative X-ray technique in a non-destructive manner, that severe COVID-19 causes massive remodelling of the finest blood vessels by causing normally separate blood systems to join together with unusual frequency.
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Image: Four men next to a CT - Peter Brotchie, Dr. Ruwan Tennakoon, Prof. John Thangarajah, Dr. Mark Page; Copyright: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

New AI tech for early detection of prostate cancer

16.07.2021

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer and a leading cause of death by cancer in Australian men. Early detection is key to successful treatment, but men often dodge the doctor, avoiding diagnosis tests until it is too late.
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Image: A physician in scrubs is putting on a Virtual Reality headset; Copyright: PantherMedia/Gorodenkoff

Broader perspective: how Mixed and Virtual Reality transform surgery

01.04.2021

For surgeons, nothing is more important than intimate knowledge and a spatial understanding of their operating field. Yet even three-dimensional imaging methods only provide limited assistance because the data is viewed on two-dimensional screens. When it comes to surgical planning or medical education, Mixed and Virtual Reality foster a better spatial understanding of the human body.
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Image: A hand is touching a three-dimensional rendering of a human skull with blood vessel; Copyright: Brainlab

Surgical planning with immersive mixed reality

01.04.2021

The job of surgeons starts long before they step into the operating room. They must use two-dimensional MRI or CT scans to plan the surgical steps on a three-dimensional patient, relying on their experience, skill, and spatial sense. Using mixed reality (MR) to view human anatomical models allows for better visualization and navigation.
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AI in the hospital – Possibilities and limits

17.01.2020

A hospital generates several thousands of gigabytes of data each day. The growing flood of data is no longer manageable for doctors. The great hope: artificial intelligence. Radiology is the main beneficiary. Dr. Felix Nensa from Essen University Hospital and Dr. Peter Langkafel from the Digital Health Factory tell us more about the possibilities and limits of learning machines.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01.10.2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02.09.2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02.09.2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02.09.2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08.04.2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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