Laboratory technology and diagnostic tests -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

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Cells: blocking metastasis-promoting enzyme
In a breakthrough with important implications for the future of immunotherapy for breast cancer, UC San Francisco scientists have found that blocking the activity of a single enzyme can prevent a common type of breast cancer from spreading to distant organs.
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Diabetes: women most affected by vascular complications
Women are most affected by the vascular complications of diabetes - a situation likely to escalate in the coming decades, reports a paper published on World Diabetes Day in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Cardiovascular disease occurs 15 years earlier in patients with diabetes and is their main cause of morbidity and mortality.
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Biosensor: technology created for stem cells
A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other neurological disorders.
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Cells: oxygen-starved tumor cells promoting cancer spread
Using cells from human breast cancers and mouse breast cancer models, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have significant new evidence that tumor cells exposed to low-oxygen conditions have an advantage when it comes to invading and surviving in the bloodstream.
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Immunology: why beta-blockers cause skin inflammation
Beta-blockers are often used to treat high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases. However, in some patients they can trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease. Scientists at the University of Bonn and Freie Universität Berlin have now found a possible cause for this. Their results have been published in the renowned journal "Autophagy".
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AI: revealing the nature of RNA-protein interactions
A new computational tool developed by KAUST scientists uses artificial intelligence (AI) to infer the RNA-binding properties of proteins. The software, called NucleicNet, outperforms other algorithmic models of its kind and provides additional biological insights that could aid in drug design and development.
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Regenerative medicine: material for cell immune response
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Montana (USA) proposed a new promising material for regenerative medicine for recovery of damaged tissues and blood vessels.
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Vaccines: super-antibody strategy
New influenza vaccines are required every autumn, because the viruses constantly change the components to which our immune protection responds. Medical research is focusing on universal vaccines that target more stable parts of the viruses. This new generation of broadly neutralising antibodies is particularly important for controlling life-threatening viral infections.
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Biosensor: made from a dangerous toxin
Some types of bacteria have the ability to punch holes into other cells and kill them. They do this by releasing specialized proteins called "pore-forming toxins" (PFTs) that latch onto the cell's membrane and form a tube-like channel that goes through it. This hole across the membrane is called a pore. Punctured by multiple PFTs, the target cell self-destructs.
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Brain mapping: unraveling the dense networks
The methods to analyze neuronal networks sparsely have been available for decades, the dense mapping of neuronal circuits is a major scientific challenge. Researchers from the MPI for Brain Research have now succeeded in the dense connectomic mapping of brain tissue from the cerebral cortex, and quantify the possible imprint of learning in the circuit.
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Cells: toxin, trauma, therapy?
The department of Prof. Tanja Weil at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research has, in cooperation with the group of Prof. Holger Barth from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Ulm University, shown in initial laboratory tests that they are able to specifically modulate processes in human white blood cells in vitro.
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Cells: gut health influences brain health
Over the last two decades, scientists have observed a clear link between autoimmune disorders and a variety of psychiatric conditions. For example, people with autoimmune disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), psoriasis and multiple sclerosis may also have depleted gut microbiota and experience anxiety, depression and mood disorders.
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Implant: 3D printing, bioinks create blood vessels
A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks, which were formulated from smooth muscle cells from a human aorta and endothelial cells from an umbilical vein.
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Point-of-care diagnostic: detecting preterm birth
A new study provides a first step toward the development of an inexpensive point-of-care diagnostic test to assess the presence of known risk factors for preterm birth in resource-poor areas. The study found that measuring levels of TIMP-1 and D-lactic acid in vaginal secretions may be a non-invasive, cost-effective way to assess the risk for preterm birth.
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Bioprinting: living cells in a 3D printer
Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework. This is achieved using additive 3D printing methods - so called "bioprinting" techniques. However, some methods are very imprecise or only allow a very short time window in which the cells can be processed without being damaged.
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Microscopy: 10-times faster image acquisition
Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow researchers to study biological processes below the classical diffraction limit of light. Ralf Jungmann, Professor for Experimental Physics at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich and research group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, and colleagues developed DNA-PAINT, a variant of these so-called super-resolution approaches.
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Antibiotic resistance: nanomesh drug delivery provides hope
The fight against global antibiotic resistance has taken a major step forward with scientists discovering a concept for fabricating nanomeshes as an effective drug delivery system for antibiotics. Health experts are increasingly concerned about the rise in medication resistant bacteria.
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AI: Sreening system detects diabetic retinopathy
New research shows that an automated, artificial intelligence (AI) screening system accurately detects diabetic retinopathy 95.5 percent of the time. The system doesn't require the input of an expert ophthalmologist and it can provide a reading in 60 seconds, making real-time screening possible for primary care practices and diabetes centers.
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Diagnostics: rapid test for Lyme disease
Some 300,000 people in the United Stated are diagnosed with Lyme disease every year. Caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted by the bite of infected Ixodes ticks, the disease if left untreated can cause serious neurologic, cardiac, and/or rheumatologic complications.
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Immunotherapy: novel technique for cancer treatment
Immunotherapy is a promising cancer treatment that uses genetically modified immune cells to fight cancer. It can be used as a primary treatment or in combination with other treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy to slow down or stop the growth of cancer cells and prevent them from spreading to other parts of the body.
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Gene: new therapeutic target for pulmonary fibrosis
Researchers in Japan have identified a genetic mutation that causes idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by killing the cells lining the lung's airways. The study, which will be published October 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that protecting these cells by inhibiting a cell death pathway called necroptosis could be a new therapeutic approach to treating IPF.
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Cells: potential liver cancer treatment
Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The most common primary liver cancer in adults is known as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and accounts for approximately 780.000 deaths every year. Even with advanced surgical treatments or transplantation, the 5-year survival rate for HCC patients remains poor due to frequent recurrence.
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Pathogens: new insights in tuberculosis
Researchers at the University of Würzburg and the Spanish Cancer Research Centre have gained new insights into the pathogen that causes tuberculosis. The work published in Nature provides the basis for a new approach in antibiotic therapy.
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3D-Printing: Wood on our Skin
Physiological parameters in our blood can be determined without painful punctures. Empa researchers are currently working with a Canadian team to develop flexible, biocompatible nanocellulose sensors that can be attached to the skin. The 3D-printed analytic chips made of renewable raw materials will even be biodegradable in future.
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Blood vessels: overly permeable
In Germany alone there are around 400,000 patients who suffer from chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. For the first time, researchers have discovered that dysfunctions in blood vessels play a significant role in the development of such diseases. In experimental model systems, the progression of the disease slowed down significantly by eliminating these dysfunctions.
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News from the exhibitors of MEDICA and COMPAMED

Canada at MEDICA, Düsseldorf (November 18 - 21, 2019)
Biggest Canadian Participation Ever MEDICA – the leading international medical tradeshow – has been attracting generations of Canadian visitors and exhibitors. This year, 59 Canadian medical...
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Dunn promotes a variety of medical tubing solutions at Compamed
Wayne, Pa. (October 25, 2019) — Dunn Industries, a Tekni-Plex business unit, will exhibit the latest medical tubing innovations at Compamed (Hall 8A / F12), Messe Dusseldorf, November 18-21.
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Natvar discusses innovative microextrusion, silicone medical tubing at Medica
Wayne, Pa. (October 23, 2019) — Natvar, a Tekni-Plex business unit, will exhibit the latest medical tubing innovations at MEDICA (Hall 6 / H30), Messe Dusseldorf, November 18-21. Microextrusion...
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CATHETRIX to Launch First Foley Catheter Securement Device, Preventing Damage from Accidental Extractions at MEDICA 2019
Dusseldorf, Germany – CATHETRIX, an innovative developer of urinary (Foley) smart catheter fixations, will unveil the world’s first Foley catheter stabilizer which actively prevents possible...
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Production of central venous catheters (CVC) from special urethane material
Optimized design of central venous catheters reduces risk of complications In the U.S., more than 5 million central venous catheters (CVCs) are inserted every year, which corresponds to 15 million...
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High Airflow Foam (HAF)
Woodbridge INOAC Technical Products is pleased to introduce our newest contribution to the foam market, High Airflow Foam (HAF). With approximately 20 times greater permeability than conventional...
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Ethylene Oxide Sterilization Solutions: reliable and safe
RSD will be this year at MEDICA trade fair, in Dusseldorf, from November 18th to 21st. For us, it is a good moment to show our EO Sterilization solutions , based on a turnkey proposals and...
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Bionix Development Corporation is a quality driven, service oriented multi-national company committed to acquiring, developing, manufacturing and marketing innovative medical products that help people
Bionix Development Corporation – Going Beyond   Since our founding in 1984, Bionix Development Corporation has been focused on Going Beyond. Going Beyond means more than simply making useful...
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Pioneering UK pressure mattress solutions to be showcased at MEDICA 2019 (Hall 16, Stand KI7-6)
A UK company, who specialises in the development and manufacture of ‘zero pressure’ technology will be at MEDICA to showcase their full range of pioneering mattress solutions. Over the last...
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High Frequency Plastic Welding services for Healthcare Industry showcased at MEDICA 2019
Speed Plastics, a specialist in high frequency welding, will once again be at MEDICA 2019 to showcase the range of bespoke engineering services they offer healthcare companies. Speed Plastics offers a...
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New Geeplus Pinch Valves Suit a Wide Range of Applications
Beckenham, United Kingdom  -In response to the growing demand for small-size low-power control components, the new range of pinch valves will suit a wide variety of applications calling for...
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New Bearing Race Design Launches Geeplus Voice Coil Motor Life Cycle to More Than 100 Million Cycles
Beckenham, United Kingdom  – In order to provide even smoother and considerably longer operation of their VM38 voice coil motor, Geeplus has developed a new version which incorporates redesigned...
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New Suture Technology May Reduce Tissue Strangulation
Teleflex Medical OEM, a global leader in specialized sutures, braids, and fibers, announces an innovative suture technology: Force Fiber Fusion® Suture. This “two-in- one” construct transitions from...
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Raumedic joins Medical Valley EMN e.V.
Helmbrechts/Erlangen  – The medical technology company Raumedic has become a member of the northern Bavarian medical cluster Medical Valley EMN e.V. More than 200 key players in the Nuremberg...
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