Laboratory equipment / diagnostic tests -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine
Mood Image

News from the editors of MEDICA-tradefair.com

Neurology: chemical reactions as the key to understanding Alzheimer's
Research teams from TU Darmstadt, British and US universities are focusing on one possible main process that leads to the death of brain cells – chemical reactions between different proteins in the brain and essential metals such as copper and iron – in their investigation of the causes and mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease.
Read more
Research from Braunschweig enables innovative pharmaceutical products
Braunschweig continues to expand its strengths in the manufacture of individualized pharmaceutical products. For this purpose, the Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films IST and the Center of Pharmaceutical Engineering (PVZ) of the Technische Universität Braunschweig are cooperating for the first time.
Read more
Better ways to culture living heart cells on the ISS
As part of preparing for an experiment aboard the International Space Station, researchers explored new ways to culture living heart cells for microgravity research.
Read more
New method for ultra-high-throughput RNA sequencing in single cells
RNA sequencing is a powerful technology for studying cells and diseases. In particular, single-cell RNA sequencing helps uncover the heterogeneity and diversity of our body. This is the central technology of the "Human Cell Atlas" in its quest to map all human cells.
Read more
Blood test detects childhood tumors based on their epigenetic profiles
A new study exploits the characteristic epigenetic signatures of childhood tumors to detect, classify and monitor the disease. The scientists analyzed short fragments of tumor DNA that are circulating in the blood. These "liquid biopsy" analyses exploit the unique epigenetic landscape of bone tumors and do not depend on any genetic alterations, which are rare in childhood cancers.
Read more
Ultrafast, on-chip PCR to speed diagnosis during pandemics
Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been the gold standard for diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the PCR portion of the test requires bulky, expensive machines and takes about an hour to complete, making it difficult to quickly diagnose someone at a testing site.
Read more
Mapping kidney stone formation from tiny to troublesome
Advanced microscope technology and cutting-edge geological science are giving new perspectives to an old medical mystery: How do kidney stones form, why are some people more susceptible to them and can they be prevented?
Read more
New miniature organ to understand human pancreas development
The pancreas is a little organ behind the stomach and has two main functions – digestion and blood sugar regulation. How the human pancreas develops has been relatively unexplored for ethical and practical reasons.
Read more
Cardioids – Heartbeat, heartbreak and recovery in a dish
Self-organizing heart organoids developed at IMBA – Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences – are also effective injury- and in vitro congenital disease models. These “cardioids” may revolutionize research into cardiovascular disorders and malformations of the heart. The results are published in the journal Cell.
Read more
Biosensor developed to aid early diagnosis of breast cancer
A team of Spanish researchers have developed, at the laboratory level, a prototype of a new biosensor to help detect breast cancer in its earliest stages.
Read more
Gold leaf could help diagnose viral infections in low-resource settings
Gold leaf - gold metal hammered into thin sheets - is used by artists and crafters to gild picture frames, artwork and clothing. Despite its luxurious appearance, the material is affordable and available at most craft stores.
Read more
Device for fast gonorrhea diagnosis
A Johns Hopkins University-led team has created an inexpensive portable device and cellphone app to diagnose gonorrhea in less than 15 minutes and determine if a particular strain will respond to frontline antibiotics.
Read more
Unprecedentedly versatile new DNA staining probe
A group of scientists at Nagoya University, Japan, have developed an incredibly versatile DNA fluorescent dye, named 'Kakshine' after a former NU student of its members, Dr. Kakishi Uno, but it also means to make the nucleus shine brightly, since the nucleus is pronounced 'Kaku' in Japanese.
Read more
Microfluidics: efficiently smuggling drugs into cells
A new, patented method called Progressive Mechanoporation makes it possible to mechanically disrupt the membranes of cells for a short time period and let drugs or genes inside cells. In this way, researchers can test new therapies more easily than before.
Read more
SARS-CoV-2: protocols for laboratories
For the development of drugs or vaccines against COVID-19, research needs virus proteins of high purity. For most of the SARS-CoV-2 proteins, scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt and a total of 36 partner laboratories have now developed protocols that enable the production of several milligrams of each of these proteins with high purity.
Read more
Researchers advance 3D printing to aid tissue replacement
Professor Arda Gozen looks to a future someday in which doctors can hit a button to print out a scaffold on their 3-D printers and create custom-made replacement skin, cartilage, or other tissue for their patients.
Read more
System to deliver glue for sealing defects in broken blood vessels
A team of researchers led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a device that offers a quicker and less invasive way to seal tears and holes in blood vessels, using an electrically-activated glue patch applied via a minimally invasive balloon catheter.
Read more
'Breakthrough' cases suggest COVID testing may be here to stay
In rare cases, people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID and are immune to the virus can nevertheless develop the disease. New findings from The Rockefeller University now suggest that these so-called breakthrough cases may be driven by rapid evolution of the virus, and that ongoing testing of immunized individuals will be important to help mitigate future outbreaks.
Read more
Respiratory viral pathogens caught on-site
The research team also developed a 3D plasmonic array chip for multiplex molecular detections: a chip that can simultaneously analyze 8 pathogens (4 bacteria and 4 viruses).
Read more
AI blood test detects early signs of bowel cancer
A new blood test developed in Wales harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to detect the early signs of bowel cancer – a disease that affects over 260,000 people in the UK today. CanSense, a Swansea University-spin out, has spent seven years developing a cancer test that can be performed at local GPs to avoid lives lost through delayed detection.
Read more
New cancer genes identified with the help of machine learning
In cancer, cells get out of control. They proliferate and push their way into tissues, destroying organs and thereby impairing essential vital functions. This unrestricted growth is usually induced by an accumulation of DNA changes in cancer genes – i.e. mutations in these genes that govern the development of the cell.
Read more
Fast, portable test can diagnose COVID-19 and track variants
Clinicians using a new viral screening test can not only diagnose COVID-19 in a matter of minutes with a portable, pocket-sized machine, but can also simultaneously test for other viruses - like influenza - that might be mistaken for the coronavirus.
Read more
COVID-19 antibody tests, even rapid finger pricks, are effective
New findings from a Michigan Medicine study reveal that antibody testing is predictive of prior COVID-19 infection, and rapid screening methods - even from finger pricks - are effective testing tools.
Read more
Temperature sensor could help safeguard mRNA vaccines
Scientists have developed vaccines for COVID-19 with record speed. The first two vaccines widely distributed in the U.S. are mRNA-based and require ultracold storage (-70 C for one and -20 C for the other).
Read more
Viewing the Virus close up
How do viral pathogens succeed in penetrating human cells? Which cellular mechanisms do they use to multiply efficiently and, in doing so, how do they change the structure of their host cell? These questions are the focus of a pan-European research project called "Compact Cell-Imaging Device" (CoCID), in which Heidelberg scientists are playing a major role.
Read more

News from the exhibitors of MEDICA and COMPAMED

The ERGO CABINET. The perfect match between design and functionality
We have launch the ERGO CABINET, a First Aid Cabinet made of injected plastic, with wall hanging, in fine and gloss finish. Wall-hanged portable First Aid Kit. Due to Its practical design it can...
Read more
TECNODRAPE - Surgical Incision Antimicrobical Drape
The surgical incision drape TECNODRAPE is made of IODOPOVIDONE and it has a grip tape made of slow-release iodine complex. TECNODRAPE is an effective and essential protection against the contamination...
Read more
Hybrisan install new electrospinning production line
Hybrisan, the South Wales based advanced antimicrobial specialists, have installed a new Elmarco electrospinning production line to increase the production of PPE equipment, while also accelerating...
Read more
SteriPack Group announces global rollout of sterile swabs to help combat Covid-19
SteriPack Group rapidly deploys equipment, expertise and facilities to meet critical need for sterile swabs, diagnostic products and personal protective equipment across their global manufacturing...
Read more
Shawpak rising to the challenge in the global fight against COVID-19
As a supplier of machines dedicated to medical packaging and as part of the Riverside Medical Packaging group shawpak have been uniquely positioned to adapt our technology to design and build PPE...
Read more
OPTIMAL HYGIENE LEVELS WITH DISPOSABLES
In the modern cleaning industry, disposable cleaning is indispensable. Several disposable cleaning wipes have been on the market for quite some time, but only recently at Flash we also introduced...
Read more
HYGIENIC FLOOR CLEANING THROUGH DRY MOPPING
Keeping surfaces and floors clean is crucial for many companies and organisations. Even though the traditional and most common cleaning method remains wet mopping, both research and the...
Read more
THE RISK OF CROSS CONTAMINATION AND WHY IT IS SO IMPORTANT
Cross contamination is the unintended transmission of bacteria, viruses or other microorganisms from one object to the other, with all its harmful effects. This has mostly been an important topic for...
Read more
Face Shield Machines to manufacture 1 1/2 million shields per month!
Riverside Medical Packaging Company Ltd were given the opportunity and challenge of producing over 6 million face shields between August and December 2020 to meet small and large customer orders. &#...
Read more
USAID FUNDS A NW50 UNIT IN TUNISIE
Newster proud to announce Dasri Sterile located in El Krib Tunisie has been awarded funds from USAID for a NW50 unit to increase it's treatment capacity to meet the large increase in COVID-19...
Read more
Super Brush Receives ISO 13485:2016 Certification
Springfield, MA – Super Brush LLC. A manufacturing leader in foam swabs and applicators announced today that the company has earned ISO 13485:2016 certification for its quality management system. ISO...
Read more
MEDICAL FAIR ASIA 2020 goes Digital with Online Convenience for Medical Sourcing Needs
MEDICAL FAIR ASIA 2020 goes Digital with Online Convenience for Medical Sourcing Needs Ten-day digital experience for a vibrant marketspace to conduct business 24/7 Singapore, 22 September 2020 –...
Read more
Mood Image