Laboratory equipment / diagnostic tests -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

News about Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica

Image: Blood is taken from the finger of an elderly woman; Copyright: PantherMedia/belchonok

Blood test shows promise in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's

07/08/2020

A new blood test demonstrated remarkable promise in discriminating between persons with and without Alzheimer's disease and in persons at known genetic risk may be able to detect the disease as early as 20 years before the onset of cognitive impairment, according to a large international study published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
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Image: A child in the ICU next to a ventilator; Copyright: PantherMedia/beerkoff1

Lab profiles differentiate MIS-C from COVID-19 in children

06/08/2020

Findings show that MIS-C is a post-infectious syndrome distinct from Kawasaki disease and may help guide treatment decisions.
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Image: Measurement of the eye pressure is performed at an older man; Copyright: PantherMedia/arztsamui

Researchers discover stem cells in optic nerve that preserve vision

05/08/2020

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have for the first time identified stem cells in the region of the optic nerve, which transmits signals from the eye to the brain.
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Image: An image of colorful dots on black ground; Copyright: Reshetniak and co-authors

Visualization of protein mobility in the synapse

04/08/2020

Scientists in the Multiscale Bioimaging Cluster of Excellence have succeeded for the first time in simultaneously displaying the motion profiles of a large number of proteins in the synapse. Published in The EMBO Journal.
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Image: A colored image of a cell putting out long arms; Copyright: Washington University in St. Louis

New insights into wound healing

04/08/2020

When we get a wound on our skin, the cells in our bodies quickly mobilize to repair it. While it has been known how cells heal wounds and how scars form, a team led by researchers from Washington University in St. Louis has determined for the first time how the process begins, which may provide new insight into wound healing, fibrosis and cancer metastasis.
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Image: biofilm of a chronic wound under the microscope; Copyright: University of Huddersfield

Biofilm early detection findings will advance chronic wound care

31/07/2020

Biofilms, microscopic entities not visible by the naked eye, go undetected by health professionals damaging healing tissue and causing delays in wound healing by reducing the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotic, antimicrobial and host immune treatments.
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Image: woman in the laboratory; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

Sars-Cov-2: rapid test for the determination of antibodies

31/07/2020

To determine immunity to Sars-Cov-2 and the effectiveness of potential vaccines, the amount of neutralising antibodies in the blood of recovered or vaccinated individuals must be determined. A traditional neutralisation test usually takes two to three days and must be carried out with infectious coronaviruses in a laboratory complying to biosafety level 3.
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Image: blood-brain barrier dysfunction under hypoxia; Copyright: WFIRM

Organoids: inflammation induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction

30/07/2020

The scientists who developed the first 3D multicellular brain organoid with a functional blood brain barrier now report that the model could be a promising platform to screen drugs that could work to control inflammation, which is at the center of many neurological conditions, like ischemic stroke.
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Image: woman with face mask holding a smartphone with the corona tracking app; Copyright: PantherMedia/Arne Trautmann

Coronavirus: tracking symptoms with app an inexact predictor of infection

28/07/2020

A new piece in Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that tracking symptoms affiliated with the novel coronavirus through an app may not be a good predictor of the spread of the disease.
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Image: Schema of novel cancer tissue diagnosis in comparison with usual diagnosis; Copyright: Osaka University

Tissue imaging system accelerates cancer diagnosis

27/07/2020

Cancer diagnosis requires a lengthy process of multiple analyses of tissue biopsies, impeding the quick and early detection of cancers. In a new study, researchers from Osaka University developed a novel imaging system that uses near-infrared light to be less invasive and more time efficient than the conventional approach.
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Image: sleeping baby; Copyright: PantherMedia / mschalke

Non-invasive biomarkers to diagnose infant urinary tract obstruction

24/07/2020

One in every 500 babies is born with a condition called ureteropelvic junction obstruction, an obstruction of the ureter that prevents urine from flowing from one or both of the kidneys into the bladder. Diagnosed prenatally, UPJO can cause urinary tract infections; it can also result in chronic kidney disease and an increased risk for cardiovascular disease in later life.
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Image: scan of bones in the hands of a person; Copyright: MedUni Vienna

Novel diagnostic approaches for aggressive bone cancer

24/07/2020

Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common form of aggressive bone cancer. A MedUni Vienna study, led by geneticist Erwin Wagner, has uncovered new insights into the disease mechanisms of OS, paving the way for potential new diagnostic and treatment strategies for fighting the bone disease. The study has just been published in the high impact journal Cell Research.
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Image: laboratoy testing of biomarkers; Copyright: PantherMedia / sven hoppe

Revealing lung disease with exhaled biomarkers

21/07/2020

Using specialized nanoparticles, MIT engineers have developed a way to monitor pneumonia or other lung diseases by analyzing the breath exhaled by the patient. In a study of mice, the researchers showed that they could use this system to monitor bacterial pneumonia, as well as a genetic disorder of the lungs called alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.
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Image: graphic of the procedure; Copyright: Staffordshire University/Josh Thomas

Simple test aids in predicting and preventing falls

20/07/2020

Scientists have developed a simple clinical test that can assess the lower limb strength of patients to predict their risk of falls. The “enhanced paper grip test” validated by researchers from the Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies at Staffordshire University involves pulling a small card from underneath the participant’s foot while asking them to grip with their big toe.
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Image: Cancer cells (in green) invading a mouse brain (blood vessels in red); Copyright: CNIO

Collaborative platform to streamline brain metastasis research

09/07/2020

Science is collaborative by nature, since scientific knowledge only advances, step by step, through combined efforts and findings. Nevertheless, there is often a lack of communication regarding the more technical and everyday advances in laboratory work, and as a result research progresses less quickly.
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Image: Two people wearing protective suits stand next to a workbench in a laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT/Foto Bernd Müller

epiLab: Coronavirus testing in the mobile safety laboratory

08/07/2020

A key to preventing SARS-CoV-2 spread is frequent, comprehensive testing. This allows the early detection of infections and helps break the chain of infection. It always comes down to Coronavirus testing capacity. In Germany's southwest state of Saarland, the mobile epiLab (epidemiological laboratory) supports the search for infections lurking in nursing homes and long-term care facilities.
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Image: symbol image for artificial intelligence; Copyright: MIPT Press Office

Machine learning helps grow artificial organs

08/07/2020

Researchers have developed a neural network capable of recognizing retinal tissues during the process of their differentiation in a dish. Unlike humans, the algorithm achieves this without the need to modify cells, making the method suitable for growing retinal tissue for developing cell replacement therapies to treat blindness and conducting research into new drugs.
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Image: medical illustration of Clostridioides difficile bacteria; Copyright: CDC

Software to find drug-resistant bacteria

07/07/2020

Washington State University researchers have developed an easy-to-use software program to identify drug-resistant genes in bacteria. The program could make it easier to identify the deadly antimicrobial resistant bacteria that exist in the environment. Such microbes annually cause more than 2.8 million difficult-to-treat pneumonia, bloodstream and other infections and 35,000 deaths in the U.S.
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Image: graphic of cell membrane on a chip; Copyright: Susan Daniel/Cornell University

Cell membrane on a chip to speed up screening of drug candidates for COVID-19

06/07/2020

Researchers have developed a human cell 'membrane on a chip' that allows continuous monitoring of how drugs and infectious agents interact with our cells, and may soon be used to test potential drug candidates for COVID-19.
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Image: Man working in a laboratory; Copyright: Cedars-Sinai

COVID-19: virus can infect heart cells in lab dish

03/07/2020

A new study shows that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can infect heart cells in a lab dish, indicating it may be possible for heart cells in COVID-19 patients to be directly infected by the virus. The discovery, published today in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, was made using heart muscle cells that were produced by stem cell technology.
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Image: graphic for heart cell observation; Copyright: Daria Sokol/MIPT Press Office

Gentle technique to study heart tissue functioning

03/07/2020

Biophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues have proposed a simple way to observe the heart tissue. Besides being relatively uncomplicated, the new method is cheaper and produces results that are more independent, compared with the analogues currently in use. The study came out in Annals of Biomedical Engineering.
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Image: 'Mini-brain' bioengineered from human stem cells; Copyright: Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Organoids suggest COVID-19 virus can infect human brain cells

02/07/2020

A multidisciplinary team from two Johns Hopkins University institutions, including neurotoxicologists and virologists from the Bloomberg School of Public Health and infectious disease specialists from the school of medicine, has found that organoids known as "mini-brains" can be infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.
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Image: point-of-care diagnostic system; Copyright: NUS Institute for Health Innovation & Technology

Portable COVID-19 diagnostic system for rapid on-site testing

29/06/2020

COVID-19 screening can soon be conducted directly at various testing stations, and patients can get their test results in about an hour from the time they get a nasal swab. A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a portable COVID-19 micro-PCR diagnostic system that enables rapid and accurate on-site screening of infectious diseases.
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Image: A female researcher in a protectic suit is working at a laboratory safety bench; Copyright: Sierra Downs, courtesy of the Griffiths Lab/BU NEIDL

Tiny decoy sponges attract coronavirus away from lung cells

25/06/2020

Imagine if scientists could stop the coronavirus infection in its tracks simply by diverting its attention away from living lung cells? A new therapeutic countermeasure, announced in a Nano Letters study by researchers from Boston University's National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) and the University of California San Diego, appears to do just that in experiments.
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Image: A black wearable device that sticks to a person's arm; Copyright: Yichao Zhao/UCLA

Adhesive film turns smartwatch into biochemical health monitoring system

25/06/2020

UCLA engineers have designed a thin adhesive film that could upgrade a consumer smartwatch into a powerful health-monitoring system. The system looks for chemical indicators found in sweat to give a real-time snapshot of what is happening inside the body. A study detailing the technology was published in the journal of Science Advances.
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Image: Two gloved hands are holding a vial of blood with the label

Biomarkers show clear signs of brain injury with severe COVID-19

23/06/2020

Certain patients who receive hospital care for coronavirus infection (COVID-19) exhibit clinical and neurochemical signs of brain injury, a University of Gothenburg study shows. In even moderate COVID-19 cases, finding and measuring a blood-based biomarker for brain damage proved to be possible.
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Image: Paul McCray and Stanley Perlman in their laboratory; Copyright: University of Iowa Health Care

Off-the-shelf tool for making mouse models of COVID-19

19/06/2020

Until there are effective treatments or vaccines, the COVID-19 pandemic will remain a significant threat to public health and economies around the world. A major hurdle to developing and testing new anti-viral therapies and vaccines for COVID-19 is the lack of good, widely available animal models of the disease.
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Image: 3D lattice structure of a tissue implanted directly onto a soft living tissue; Copyright: Ohio State University

Directly printing 3D tissues within the body

18/06/2020

In the TV series Westworld, human body parts are built on robotic frames using 3D printers. While still far from this scenario, 3D printers are being increasingly used in medicine. For example, 3D printing can be used to produce parts of the body such as orthopedic joints and prosthetics, as well as portions of bone, skin and blood vessels.
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Graphic: Low-oxygen cell culture conditions combined with human heart organoids recreate tissue-level features of a post-heart attack heart; Copyright: Dr. Dylan Richards

Tissue Engineering: heart attack in a dish

16/06/2020

A team of investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and Clemson University recently reported in an article in Nature Biomedical Engineering that they have developed human cardiac organoids less than 1 millimeter in diameter that closely resemble the physiological conditions that occur during a heart attack.
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Image: 3D-printed tissue; Copyright: University of Colorado Denver

3D-printable material that mimics biological tissues

12/06/2020

Biological tissues have evolved over millennia to be perfectly optimized for their specific functions. Take cartilage as an example. It's a compliant, elastic tissue that's soft enough to cushion joints, but strong enough to resist compression and withstand the substantial load bearing of our bodies: key for running, jumping, and our daily wear and tear.
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Image: Microneedles attached to a strip of tape; Copyright: Khademhosseini Lab

Delivering stem cells for localized MSC therapy

10/06/2020

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent in that they naturally replenish the cell types that build our bone, cartilage and adipose tissues. However, their much broader regenerative potential, based on their capacity to migrate and engraft in injured tissues, makes them exquisite candidates for cell-based therapies for diseases.
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Image: Black and white microscope image of a patch with a spiky surface; Copyright: Khademhosseini lab

Extraction of skin interstitial fluid using microneedle patches

05/06/2020

Researchers at the Terasaki Institute enhance tool for extraction of samples used in monitoring patient health.
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Image: A young man with a bald head shows the scar of skull surgery; Copyright: PantherMedia/hplovecraft.mail.ru

Mapping immune cells in brain tumors with AI

04/06/2020

It is not always possible to completely remove malignant brain tumors by surgery so that further treatment is necessary. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now been able to describe the composition of the immune cells of various types of brain tumors. This will provide an important foundation for future immunotherapy approaches.
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Image: particles from a simple breath test behind a petri dish with chips ins it; Copyright: Ben-Gurion University

One minute electro-optical coronavirus test

29/05/2020

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev's Prof. Gabby Sarusi has developed a one-minute electro-optical test of nose, throat or breath samples that will identify both asymptomatic and affected carriers of the COVID-19 virus in under one minute with greater than 90 percent accuracy.
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Image: 7 weeks old human embryo surrounded by placenta; Copyright: Hill, M.A. (2020, May 18)

Unique insight into development of human brain

28/05/2020

Stem cell researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new research model of the early embryonic brain. The aim of the model is to study the very earliest stages of brain to understand how different regions in the brain are formed during embryonic development.
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Image: red, green and yellow droplets; Copyright: Pak Kin Wong, Penn State

New urine testing method holds promise for kidney stone sufferers

27/05/2020

An improved urine-testing system for people suffering from kidney stones inspired by nature and proposed by researchers from Penn State and Stanford University may enable patients to receive results within 30 minutes instead of the current turnaround time of a week or more.
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Image: small portable device next to tennis ball; Copyright: Nishiyama K. et al., Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical. April 21, 2020

COVID-19: technology can detect anti-virus antibody in 20 minutes

25/05/2020

Researchers have succeeded in detecting anti-avian influenza virus antibody in blood serum within 20 minutes, using a portable analyzer they have developed to conduct rapid on-site bio tests. If a suitable reagent is developed, this technology could be used to detect antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of COVID-19.
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Independent studies show increased thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in COVID-19 patients

25/05/2020

Research teams at Hamburg-Eppendorf University Hospital and Beijing Union Medical College Hospital Beijing found that SARS-CoV-2 infections can lead to thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. In addition...
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Image: Tube being filled in a laboratory setting; Copyright: UEF/ Raija Törrönen

Boost cancer treatment with new LAT1 inhibitor

18/05/2020

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed a new and promising drug compound for the treatment of cancer that inhibits natural amino acids from entering cancer cells. Since amino acids are essential for the growth and division of cancer cells, the new LAT1 inhibitor makes it possible to inhibit their growth. The study was published in the journal Apoptosis.
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Image: Woman pointing at data on a monitor; Copyright: Nathan L. Galli, University of Utah

Pattern found in tumors predicts life expectancy

18/05/2020

For the past 70 years, the best indicator of life expectancy for a patient with glioblastoma (GBM) has simply been age at diagnosis. Now, an international team of scientists has experimentally validated a predictor that is not only more accurate but also more clinically relevant: a pattern of co-occurring changes in DNA abundance levels.
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Image: A gloved hand holds a cup with an urine sample; Copyright: PantherMedia/belchonok

COVID-19: kidney inflammation as early warning sign for severe course

13/05/2020

Scientists from the University Medical Center Goettingen develop a conceivable course of action for patients with COVID-19 infections to predict severity of systemic disease and complications. Published online in The Lancet.
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Image: An electronic component with a cable and a light; Copyright: Massood Tabib-Azar/University of Utah College of Engineering

Portable, reusable test for COVID-19

12/05/2020

University of Utah engineer is developing a fast, reusable test for COVID-19 that works with cellphones.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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FIND Collaborate with SpeeDx and QuantuMDx

14/11/2019

The Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) are supporting a collaboration with SpeeDx and QuantuMDx to assess the feasibility of developing low-cost point of care (POC) tests for...
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Canada at MEDICA, Düsseldorf (November 18 - 21, 2019)

11/11/2019

Biggest Canadian Participation Ever MEDICA – the leading international medical tradeshow – has been attracting generations of Canadian visitors and exhibitors. This year, 59 Canadian medical...
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Linnodee Diagnostics Ltd - specialising in veterinary diagnostic tests for Leptospirosis

08/11/2019

Linnodee Diagnostics Ltd. is dedicated to the design and manufacture of clinical and veterinary diagnostic tests for Leptospirosis. The company was established in 1999 by the late Dr Ernest F Logan...
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Image: Blood sample labelled

Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08/11/2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04/11/2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04/11/2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
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Oxford MEStar to Announce Launch of measurePRO POC Faecal Occult Blood Test at MEDICA

25/10/2019

 Oxford MEStar will be attending the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf (November 18th-21st 2019) as part of the ABHI UK pavillion in Hall 16 (stand 16K03-3) and announcing the launch of their new...
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BioTeZ is starting to develop a new method for directly measuring the primary effect of drugs on their target molecule.

17/10/2019

BioTeZ starts the project for the development of a companion diagnostic procedure. The aim is to determine the optimal drug dose for each patient to reduce side effects, to achieve the Therapeutic...
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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IVDR-Alliance offers One-Stop-Solution for IVDR-compliance

26/09/2019

The IVD-Alliance is an intitiative to support companies in die IVD-business with knowledge and test equipment to reach the European IVDR-compliance until May 2020. The alliance is a cooperation...
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23/09/2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01/08/2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01/08/2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08/07/2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22/03/2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01/03/2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01/02/2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Glucometer next to a smartphone that shows the blood glucose level; Copyright: panthermedia.net/simpson33

DiaDigital: making sense of diabetes apps

02/01/2019

While they are very useful, health apps have one major drawback: anyone can release and distribute them unchecked. Only some apps require medical device certification. So how can users spot a great, safe and useful app? When it comes to diabetes apps, the “DiaDigital” seal of distinction is the answer.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02/01/2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02/01/2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21/11/2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Neighbours as guests at MEDICA - Interview at the Polish joint stand

15/11/2018

100 Polish exhibitors will be present at this year's MEDICA and show their new innovations in medical technology. You can find out what there is to discover at the Polish joint stand in our interview.
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Interview with Hombrechtikon Systems Engineering AG

15/11/2018

Whether DNA testing, tissue analysis or blood tests – the secrets of life are unraveled in the laboratory. In order to master this challenge, all processes must first be optimized and automated. Which role HSE AG plays here, the Swiss company explains at MEDICA 2018.
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Interview with ERBA Diagnostics Mannheim GmbH

15/11/2018

A lot of answers in medicine are found in the laboratory. Correct analysis is key to find the right diagnosis and cure for the patient. We learn more about innovative analysis devices at the stand of ERBA Diagnostics at MEDICA 2018.
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Past, present and future of MEDICA – Interview with Horst Giesen

12/11/2018

Even before MEDICA begins, the Düsseldorf trade fair grounds are alive like a beehive: in the halls, stands are built and exhibits are delivered, while the trade fair management coordinates logistics and services for exhibitors and visitors. We were still able to have a short talk to Horst Giesen, Global Portfolio Director Health & Medical Technologies of Messe Düsseldorf, despite all the bustle.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09/07/2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Personalized cancer medicine – Best possible treatment with TherapySelect

30/04/2018

Medicine is getting more and more personalized. This is particularly interesting for oncology, since a cancer is as individual as the respective patient. When choosing a therapy, both the characteristics of the tumor and the personal characteristics of the patient must be considered. To see exactly what this looks like, we visited the diagnostics company TherapySelect, based in Heidelberg.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: Several colorful pills placed on a target, one of them is in the center; Copyright: panthermedia.net/georgemuresan

Personalized Medicine – focused on healing

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not want to measure all patients with the same yardstick anymore. Instead, it aims to precisely fit the therapy to the cause of their disease. This often means a more successful treatment with less side effects for patients. And for physicians, interdisciplinary cooperation and decision making come to the fore.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Three proofs in one go - Interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG

13/11/2017

Measles, mumps and rubella are usually mentioned in connection with the well-known polyvalent vaccine. Now, a novel DNA test can be used to remedy an unclear situation about an infection. It is supposed to detect all three diseases in just one step. Find out more in our interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG at MEDICA 2017.
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