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Image: man with VR glasses in front of two monitors with microscopy data; Copyright: Carnegie Mellon University

VR: visualize expansion microscopy data and illuminate new treatments

17.06.2019

A combined research team from Carnegie Mellon University and Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason is pairing a nanoscale imaging technique with virtual reality (VR) technology to create a method that allows researchers to "step inside" their biological data.
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Image: Reasearchers who developed FEAST to diagnose bacteria-related health conditions; Copyright: UCLA Samueli Engineering

Computational system: tool pinpoints gut's bacteria

14.06.2019

A UCLA-led research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from. Broadly, the tool can deduce the origins of any microbiome, a localized and diverse community of microscopic organisms.
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Image: doctor investigates skin of a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net / belchonock

AI: diagnosis of skin lesions is superior to humans

13.06.2019

When it comes to the diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions, artificial intelligence is superior to humans. In a study conducted under the supervision of the MedUni Vienna human experts "competed" against computer algorithms. The algorithms achieved clearly better results, yet their current abilities cannot replace humans.
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Image: Woman undergoing a CT scan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tyler Olsonv

Machine learning: superior results for low-dose CT

12.06.2019

Machine learning has the potential to vastly advance medical imaging, particularly computerized tomography (CT) scanning, by reducing radiation exposure and improving image quality. Those new research findings were just published in Nature Machine Intelligence by engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and radiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
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Image: DNA strands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Rost9

AI: method to improve rare disease diagnosis

11.06.2019

The team under Prof. Tom Lenaerts (VUB-ULB) of the IB² has developed an AI algorithm that makes it possible to identify combinations of genetic variants or abnormalities that cause rare diseases through computer analysis.
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Image: Hands of a woman holding a smartphone; Copyright: McLean Hospital

Apps: cognitive therapy in your pocket

07.06.2019

Based on a study by McLean Hospital researchers, individuals with anxiety, depression, and other mental health conditions may soon be able to use a smartphone app to deliver on-demand cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I), a way to change mental habits without visiting a therapist.
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03.06.2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03.06.2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Boy uses robot arm in front of a monitor with computer game, next to it stands the therapist; Copyright: Helios Klinik Hattingen

Rehab with a robot – robot-assisted therapy in neurology

03.06.2019

It takes consistent repetitions if rehab patients want to relearn skills after surviving a stroke. This requires extreme effort. The industrial sector uses robots to perform repetitive tasks or handle jobs that require strength. What has been a fixture in factories for decades is now also making its way into rehabilitation facilities.
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03.06.2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: hand holding orange fabric; Copyright: University of Borås

Wearables: new method to evaluate comfort of smart and functional textiles

31.05.2019

Until now, user-friendliness has been the focus of the development of smart and functional textiles. Now it is time to address comfort when wearing these textiles – a quality factor that should be of interest to the industry.
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Image: graphic of disrupted regulation of autism-related genes; Copyright: Troyanskaya lab

AI detects a new class of mutations behind autism

30.05.2019

Many mutations in DNA that contribute to disease are not in actual genes but instead lie in the 99% of the genome once considered "junk." Even though scientists have recently come to understand that these vast stretches of DNA do in fact play critical roles, deciphering these effects on a wide scale has been impossible until now.
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Image: team photo in which one man is holding a smartphone into the camera and one man sits in front of a computer; Copyright: National University of Singapore

mHealth: AI to enhance cognitive performance

28.05.2019

Researchers have shown that AI could potentially be used to customise training regimens for individuals to personalise learning and improve cognitive performance. Using performance data from a given person, CURATE.AI creates an individualised profile that enables cognitive training to be tailored to the individual's learning habits and competencies so as to enhance training effectiveness.
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Image: head of a man at a computer with two monitors; Copyright: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen

Big Data: algorithm predicts intensive care patients' chances of survival

27.05.2019

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Rigshospitalet have used data on more than 230,000 intensive care patients to develop a new algorithm. Among other things, it uses disease history from the past 23 years to predict patients' chances of survival in intensive care units.
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 Image: Abdelrasoul leads the research team of University of Saskatchewan; Copyright: Daniel Hallen, University of Saskatchewan

Wearables: World's first wearable kidney

23.05.2019

An artificial portable kidney that patients who have suffered renal failure could wear is to be created by a research team at the University of Saskatchewan with federal funding.
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Bild: Mann liegt auf dem Boden, vor ihm der mobile Roboter mit Tablet; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

MobiKa – programmed to help

22.05.2019

Many illnesses or old age require help with everyday tasks. Unfortunately, family members or caregivers aren’t always available to lend a hand. The MobiKa mobile service robot is designed to offer support, deliver motivation and improve the quality of life of those in need.
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Image: New deep-learning model for lung cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / belchonock

AI: System spots lung cancer before radiologists

22.05.2019

Deep learning - a form of artificial intelligence - was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine.
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Image: Woman with dementia listens to music; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Robert Przybysz

Assistance systems: AI radio for people with dementia

21.05.2019

Radio Me will address key causes of hospital admission for people with dementia, such as agitation and not taking medication correctly. As a result, it is hoped quality of life will improve, and people will be able to remain living independently at home for longer.
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Image: Girl with asthma; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Aaron Amat

App: Asthma tracking for children

21.05.2019

An app that allows parents and doctors to monitor a child's asthma has a big impact on managing the disease. When families monitored symptoms with eAsthma Tracker and adjusted care accordingly, children had better asthma control and made fewer visits to the emergency department.
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Image: woman with breast cancer and child in her arms; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ArturVerkhovetskiy

AI: Novel method predicts future risk of breast cancer

14.05.2019

Researchers from two major institutions have developed a new tool with advanced artificial intelligence (AI) methods to predict a woman's future risk of breast cancer.
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Image: senior woman with VR glasses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Marko Volkmar

VR can improve quality of life for people with dementia

10.05.2019

Virtual reality (VR) technology could vastly improve the quality of life for people with dementia by helping to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, new research by the University of Kent has discovered.
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Image: man in nursing home in wheelchair stroking a dog; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Robopets can benefit health and wellbeing of elderly

09.05.2019

Researchers found evidence that 'robopets' can provide comfort and pleasure and reduce agitation and loneliness. Funded by NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South West Peninsula PenCLAHRC), the study also found that robopets increase social interaction with other residents, family members and staff, often through acting as a stimulus for conversation.
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Image: senior woman in a wheelchair watching TV from above; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

eHealth: wireless system collects health and behavioral data

09.05.2019

We live in a world of wireless signals flowing around us and bouncing off our bodies. MIT researchers are now leveraging those signal reflections to provide scientists and caregivers with valuable insights into people's behavior and health.
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Image: close-up of a crying child; Copyright: Anthony Kelly

AI can detect depression in a child's speech

08.05.2019

A machine learning algorithm can detect signs of anxiety and depression in the speech patterns of young children, potentially providing a fast and easy way of diagnosing conditions that are difficult to spot and often overlooked in young people, according to new research published in the Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08.05.2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Image: head of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tyler Olson

Imaging: Dataset bridges human vision and machine learning

08.05.2019

Neuroscientists and computer vision scientists say a new dataset of unprecedented size - comprising brain scans of four volunteers who each viewed 5,000 images - will help researchers better understand how the brain processes images.
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Image: man with smartwatch playing piano; Copyright: Carnegie Mellon University

mHealth: Smartwatches sense hand activity

07.05.2019

We've become accustomed to our smartwatches and smartphones sensing what our bodies are doing, be it walking, driving or sleeping. But what about our hands? It turns out that smartwatches, with a few tweaks, can detect a surprising number of things your hands are doing.
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Image: Key of security; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Kheng Ho Toh

Cybersecurity: New chip stops attacks before they start

03.05.2019

A new computer processor architecture developed at the University of Michigan could usher in a future where computers proactively defend against threats, rendering the current electronic security model of bugs and patches obsolete.
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Image: Hands in front of a computer and tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrew Lozovyi

Human firewall – keeping your resources safe

02.05.2019

Digitization impacts many areas of life. It is also remapping the healthcare landscape and is becoming increasingly important, ensuring that patients receive comprehensive care as quickly as possible. To make this a reality, data is stored digitally and medical devices are connected.
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Image: Graphic of a spinglass of human gene interactions; Copyright: Graeme Benstead-Hume, University of Sussex

Computational system: Algorithms for cancer treatments

02.05.2019

While network algorithms are usually associated with finding friends on social media, researchers at the University of Sussex have shown how they could also be used improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment, by predicting the interactions between genes.
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Image: A male and a female physician look at a tablet together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Cybersecurity in the hospital: securely networked

02.05.2019

Digitalization and networking are supposed to serve the health care system well: In times of staff shortages and demographic change, they are able to support the exchange of patient data and the management of chronic diseases as well as to improve the workflow. But it is still often ignored that both individual devices and complete networks can become lucrative targets for cybercrimes.
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Image: A hospital room with different monitors and medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Christopher Boswell

Hospital cybersecurity: secure technology and trained employees go hand in hand

02.05.2019

When it comes to IT, the medical sector has a dilemma: On the one hand, digitization and networks are designed to save both time and money. Yet on the other hand, medical systems, physician offices, and hospital networks don’t have nearly the same levels of protection as online stores, payment service providers or financial institutions. That’s also partially due to an absence of risk awareness.
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Image: View of laptop screen with message that data was encrypted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Security first – hospitals prime targets of cyberattacks

02.05.2019

Safety should be a top priority when it comes to safeguarding human lives. That's why hospitals must protect their computer networks and data against unauthorized access. However, thanks to the proliferation of connected devices in hospitals, they are at high risk of suffering devastating cyberattacks. There is also a lack of cybersecurity awareness.
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Image: AI analyzes diabetic ratinopathy; Copyright: panthermedia.net / peshkova

mHealth: Smartphone AI detects diabetic retinopathy

01.05.2019

Researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center revealed that combining a smartphone-mounted device that takes high-quality retinal pictures with artificial intelligence software that reads them, can determine in real- time whether a patient should be referred to an ophthalmologist for follow-up.
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Image: Child suffering from cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / frantab

Software: Advanced radiation therapy for children

29.04.2019

Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles continue to lead the field of radiation oncology by pushing the leading edge of technological advances. A new report by Arthur Olch, PhD, highlights use of specialized software that could advance treatment accuracy for pediatric cancer patients.
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Image: Men at the sea plays the mobile game Sea Hero Quest; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia Itd

mobile Health: Game detects Alzheimer's risk

29.04.2019

A specially designed mobile phone game can detect people at risk of Alzheimer's - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers studied gaming data from an app called Sea Hero Quest, which has been downloaded and played by more than 4.3 million people worldwide.
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Image: A patch with coloured dots on human skin; Copyright: American Chemical Society

Wearables: biosensor 'bandage' collects and analyzes sweat

25.04.2019

Like other biofluids, sweat contains a wealth of information about what's going on inside the body. However, collecting the fluid for analysis, usually by dripping or absorbing it from the skin's surface, can be time-consuming and messy.
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Image: An ELISA test strip is compared to a coloured scale; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Software aims to reduce variability in ELISA biomarker tests

24.04.2019

A new computational approach has been developed to reduce variability in common research biomarker tests, a promising step in improving the ability of biomedical researchers and basic scientists to reproduce data and facilitate more consistent results across laboratories and long-term projects.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23.04.2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: A pin in a map; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Klanneke

Medical imaging: roadmap for AI use

22.04.2019

In August 2018, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., to explore the future of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging. The workshop was co-sponsored by NIH, the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and The Academy for Radiology and Biomedical Imaging Research (The Academy).
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Image: doctors in front of an MRI Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Arne Trautmann

AI performs as well as experienced radiologists

18.04.2019

UCLA researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence system to help radiologists improve their ability to diagnose prostate cancer. The
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Image: PAGA based embedding of the developmental trajectories in the Zebrafish embryo, colored by timepoint.; Copyright: Wagner et al., Science (2018)

Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA

16.04.2019

Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA.
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Image: a robot; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdecoret

AI singles out neurons faster than a human can

16.04.2019

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an automated process that can trace the shapes of active neurons as accurately as human researchers can, but in a fraction of the time.
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Image: hand with a smartwatch picks up an apple from a fruit bowl; Copyright: Global Kinetics Corporation

Wearables: wrist band to empower Parkinson's patients

11.04.2019

People with Parkinson's could see their care transformed thanks to a new service involving wearable technology. The project, entitled Developing Home-based Parkinson's Care, will see patients use a wrist-worn device known as a Personal Kinetigraph as part of a new scheme to help them and a specialist team monitor their condition at home.
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Image: several images of a 3D printed soft robot hand; Copyright: Ramses Martinez/Purdue University

3D printed robots could be caring for elderly

10.04.2019

The world's elderly population is booming. The number of older people - those age 60 years or older - is expected to more than double by 2050 and is growing faster than all younger age groups across the globe. This trend comes with an increasing demand for caregivers capable of providing 24-hour care, not only at hospitals or nursing homes, but also at private homes and apartments.
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Image: graphic showing the function of the smart fabric on the left, arm with a bandage on the right; Copyright: Dartmouth DartNets Lab

Smart fabric helps athletic coaching and physical therapy

09.04.2019

A computer science research team at Dartmouth College has produced a smart fabric that can help athletes and physical therapy patients correct arm angles to optimize performance, reduce injury and accelerate recovery.
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Image: A physician's hands on a laptop with a stethoscope next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Rangizzz

eHealth: antibiotic overprescribing thanks to telemedicine

08.04.2019

Children with acute respiratory infections were prescribed antibiotics more often during direct-to-consumer telemedicine visits than during in-person primary care appointments or urgent care visits, according to UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh research reported today in Pediatrics.
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Image: Researchers at NUS; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Cyber security: photons for optical fiber obstacle

05.04.2019

Researchers from the NUS-Singtel Cyber Security Research & Development Laboratory in Singapore demonstrate a way to improve quantum key distribution over fiber networks.
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Image: computational model for cancer treatment; Copyright: Kimberly Sabsay

Computational model for cancer treatment

05.04.2019

Researchers have developed a computational model for human MEK1, a protein with potential as a drug target for a variety of human cancers.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: a finger on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/solarseven

Big Data: Software predicts risk of irregular heart beats

29.03.2019

Combining a wealth of information derived from previous studies with data from more than 500 patients, an international team led by researchers from Johns Hopkins has developed a computer-based set of rules that more accurately predicts when patients with a rare heart condition might benefit--or not--from lifesaving implanted defibrillators.
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Image: close-up of a boy looking out a window; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Dubova

Virtual reality for autism

28.03.2019

Playing games in virtual reality (VR) could be a key tool in treating people with neurological disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. The technology, according to a recent study from the University of Waterloo, could help individuals with these neurological conditions shift their perceptions of time, which their conditions lead them to perceive differently.
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Image: Smart wristband in men`s hand monitors atrial fibrillation; Copyright: Juste Suminaite (KTU)

Smart wristband alerts dangerous health conditions

28.03.2019

Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania researchers are developing a smart wrist-worn device for monitoring of atrial fibrillation - a condition, which if left untreated can lead to serious health complications and even death.
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Image: on the left side a moving baby, on the right a stickman of it; Copyright: S Vanhatalo / University of Helsinki

AI identifies key patterns from video footage of infant movements

27.03.2019

Subtle characteristics in the spontaneous movement of very young babies may reveal clinically important aspects of their neurodevelopment. Visual assessment of typical movement patterns (General movements, GM) by a clinical expert is known to be effective in early identification of e.g. cerebral palsy (CP).
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Image: hospital corridor; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AxelKillian

IT: Smart speaker technology for hospital medical treatments

26.03.2019

Smart speakers that are customarily used in your living room can be programmed to act as an aid to physicians in hospital operating rooms. Smart speakers, such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home, offer a conversational voice interface that allows interventional radiology (IR) physicians to ask questions and retrieve information needed for their patient treatments without breaking sterile scrub.
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Image: A man with a dark beard holds a toilet seat with electronic patterns into the camera; Copyright: A. Sue Weisler/RIT

Cardiology: Toilet seat detects congestive heart failure

25.03.2019

With 1 million new cases of congestive heart failure diagnosed each year, a revolutionary product is making it easier for hospitals to monitor patients with the condition in the comfort of their own homes.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01.03.2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01.03.2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
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Image: Dosage inhaler and stethoscope in front of a shelf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/liudmilachernetska@gmail.com

React early, breathe free – comprehensive COPD management

01.03.2019

COPD is considered the third most common cause of death worldwide and mainly affects smokers. It is not curable, but with the right combination of early diagnosis, therapy and self-management, a significant part of the quality of life can be regained. The comprehensive care is supported by various devices and technical tools. Learn more about the all-round care of COPD in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Woman looks at the image of an injured soccer player on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Sports medicine: preventing injuries with wearable sensors

08.02.2019

The consequences of sports injuries can be very serious and sideline athletes for a long time. Although it often seems like these injuries happen in a split second, they can also be the result of overuse and loads that usually weaken the athlete over time. This stress can be detected and reduced with wearable technology and injuries prevented before they happen.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01.02.2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Woman at her desk holding her back; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrey Popov

AI ensures dynamic sitting

22.01.2019

Whether in the office, at school or behind the wheel: we spend a lot of time sitting and often stay in the same position for too long. The possible side effects are stiffness, back problems and pain. The SensA-Chair smart seating solution combats decreased mobility and ensures dynamic sitting.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – “TelePark“- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08.01.2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: Glucometer next to a smartphone that shows the blood glucose level; Copyright: panthermedia.net/simpson33

DiaDigital: making sense of diabetes apps

02.01.2019

While they are very useful, health apps have one major drawback: anyone can release and distribute them unchecked. Only some apps require medical device certification. So how can users spot a great, safe and useful app? When it comes to diabetes apps, the “DiaDigital” seal of distinction is the answer.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02.01.2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02.01.2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19.12.2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21.11.2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with Verso Vision

15.11.2018

Artificial intelligence and algorithms that become ever more complex are increasingly used in devices in the hospital. This does not only bring speed, but also safety to the treatment and care of patients. We learn more at the stand of Verso Vision at MEDICA 2018.
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Neighbours as guests at MEDICA - Interview at the Polish joint stand

15.11.2018

100 Polish exhibitors will be present at this year's MEDICA and show their new innovations in medical technology. You can find out what there is to discover at the Polish joint stand in our interview.
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Surglasses: surgery with perspective: Interview with Taiwan Main Orthopedics

15.11.2018

Surgeons need a good overview of what they are doing. This is especially true for minimally-invasive surgery, since they cannot see the operating area directly. Using augmented reality, Taiwan Main Orthopedics Biotechnology helps surgeons to retain their perspective, even during complex interventions.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

Patient care of the future? Robotics, AI and Big Data at MEDICA 2018

14.11.2018

Robotics, artificial intelligence, big data: these are terms that were not used in connection with medicine a few years ago. Today they are no longer dreams of the future, but an important support in diagnosis, during surgery or aftercare. Find out more at MEDICA 2018!
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Image: preview picture of the video

Intelligent, portable, but also practicable? Wearables and smart textiles tested at MEDICA

13.11.2018

Whether intelligent Smartwatch, a vest that measures heart rate or a pocket-sized allergy test: Wearables and smart Textiles are important health aids, but how practical are they really? We did the test at MEDICA 2018.
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Healthcare data to go – Interview with medicus.ai

13.11.2018

New technologies lead to new challenges, but also open up new possibilities. At the stand of Medicus AI at MEDICA 2018, we will find out what they look like specifically for medicine. The company has developed an app that bundles all of a patient's health-related data and helps understand medical reports.
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Past, present and future of MEDICA – Interview with Horst Giesen

12.11.2018

Even before MEDICA begins, the Düsseldorf trade fair grounds are alive like a beehive: in the halls, stands are built and exhibits are delivered, while the trade fair management coordinates logistics and services for exhibitors and visitors. We were still able to have a short talk to Horst Giesen, Global Portfolio Director Health & Medical Technologies of Messe Düsseldorf, despite all the bustle.
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Digitization: Hospitals as Popular Targets?

02.11.2018

It’s safe to say that patients and their prompt medical care take center stage at any hospital. Digitization of the healthcare sector is quickly advancing to make this a reality: data is stored in a digital medium, devices are linked together. But how safe are hospitals in the age of innovation?
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Image: Robots and Artificial Intelligence; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sdecoret

"Dr. Algorithm suggests the best treatment option"

02.11.2018

The technology of the 20th century is progressing faster than ever – and this also applies to technology in the field of medicine. That’s why it is only a matter of time before hospitals are fully driven by artificial intelligence - data-driven medicine that suggests the best treatment and facilitates zero error surgeries. A path that doesn’t just require openness!
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02.11.2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: graphical steps of lung segmentation; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus/A. Braune

Lung segmentation: easier and faster thanks to new algorithms

01.10.2018

A look inside the lungs is a time-consuming process. To identify the boundaries of the respiratory organ from surrounding other organs, tissues, and structures requires between 200 and 500 computed tomographic images and subsequent manual markings – an elaborate process that can take up to six hours. An optimized computer program is now able to do this in only a few seconds.
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Air Next: sharing spirometry data for better treatment

24.09.2018

Some diseases require close, permanent control of the patient, especially if they are chronic and, if unchecked, potentially dangerous, like some lung diseases. Monitoring them is quite cumbersome, because patients regularly need to visit their physician or a hospital. Wireless devices for home measurements offer at least some comfort and relieve to patients.
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Image: for better care: the electronic patient file; Copyright: panthermedia.net/hasloo

Electronic Health Record: Transparent Patient?

21.09.2018

A smart hospital has many components, which ultimately come together as a connected whole, thus achieving better patient care. One crucial piece of the puzzle that some countries like the U.S. have implemented but one that’s still missing in Germany is the electronic health record (or electronic medical record). It is shrouded in controversy and yet a critical aspect of the hospital of the future.
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Image: Physician with stethoscope, in front of which digital symbols float, in the background an OR; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Smart Hospital: Healthcare rethought

03.09.2018

The focus of every hospital are the patient and caring for him quickly. However, processes are often delayed because, for example, the patient data first has to be recorded with time consuming effort or a specialist is not currently on site. The Smart Hospital aims to avoid these problems – through interconnection of all instances and the integration of the most modern communication technologies.
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Image: View over the shoulder of a person with a tablet in his hand, showing the operating theatre in front of him with screens and devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Master plan Smart Hospital: well-connected is half cared for

03.09.2018

Artificial intelligence makes the diagnosis, robots perform the surgery and physicians manage all processes via touchscreen – is that what hospitals of the future will look like? And how far away are we actually from this future? Many hospital facilities are already on their way to becoming Smart Hospitals with the latest technology and where everything and everyone is linked and connected.
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Image: Two physicians are looking at a model of a vascular system through 3D glasses; Copyright: Brainlab AG

Smart Hospital: How devices communicate in the OR

03.09.2018

In a Smart Hospital, all devices are designed to be connected and integrated, thus increasing efficiency and reducing time loss – at least, that is how things are meant to work in theory. In reality, there are still countless vendor-specific point solutions that cannot be integrated. That's why there is a need for solutions that bridge the gap between the different applications and formats.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22.08.2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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How big data leads to diagnosis

01.08.2018

Physicians usually diagnose like this nowadays: They examine the patient and talk to him about his problems, they compare his symptoms to disease pictures they know, and, in complex cases, they research the literature or bring in colleagues. But could it happen in the future that physicians simply collect the patient data and feed it into an algorithm that then names the most likely diagnoses?
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Image: A man is working at a computer that shows a model of the human liver; Copyright: Fraunhofer MEVIS

AI in medicine: Machines do not learn like humans

01.08.2018

For years, medicine has been exploring AI techniques aimed at easing physician workload. While computers may not have the medical expertise and skills obtained through years of study, they can recognize patterns and specific features in datasets and draw deductions.
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Image: Computer generated model of a human body, consisting of a white grid; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kheng Ho Toh

Diagnosing diseases with big data

01.08.2018

All of us generate data every day without even realizing it – sometimes it happens unconsciously and unintentionally. At this point, we are made of data and not just in the eyes of tech companies but also from a healthcare system perspective. Our electronic health records are a smorgasbord of data for example.
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Image: Older couple is sitting next to each other, using their smartphones; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Fabrice Michaudeau

Neurology: Early detection of Parkinson’s disease with app and data?

01.08.2018

Big Data is often likened to finding the proverbial needle in a haystack: Large volumes of data contain patterns that hold the answer to a particular question. The trick is to gather meaningful data and identify patterns. The i-PROGNOSIS research project shows how smart devices and an app team up to automatically collect data without disturbing the user.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23.07.2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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The path to the Digi-Doc – MEDICA 2018

19.07.2018

The electronic patient record is only one of many examples that shows how difficult digitization is in the healthcare industry in Germany. So it is no wonder that this topic will dominate at MEDICA, the world's largest medical trade fair. At the same time, the suppliers of medical technology present themselves.
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Image: Two paramedics in the driver’s cab of an ambulance, one is using the radio; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Artur Verkhovetskiy

Telemedicine – well-connected in emergencies

02.07.2018

Every second counts in an emergency: First aiders, rescuers and hospital staff need to work hand in hand and act quickly to save the life of an injured person. This is not always easy, for example when an ambulance or an emergency physician cannot be on site in time. Telemedicine steps in as an additional member of the chain of survival at this point.
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Image: Paramedics that transport a man towards an ambulance; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Artur Verkhovetskiy

Video streaming, apps, and smart glasses: telemedicine on standby

02.07.2018

Looking at the trends and innovations in emergency medicine, it is apparent that the idea of an ambulance as a kind of mobile emergency room that comes to patients, connects them with health professionals and makes a diagnosis en route to the hospital, is gaining momentum. The increased usage of telemedicine plays a big part in this development.
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Image: young woman kneels next to unconscious man and makes call with smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pixelaway

Resuscitation via videostream – how EmergencyEye can save lives

02.07.2018

When the heart stops beating, irreversible brain damage occurs within minutes without resuscitation. Meanwhile, action is only taken in very few instances of cardiac arrest. Even first responders frequently feel helpless in this situation. In Germany, approximately 65,000 people die each year from sudden cardiac arrest. This is where EmergencyEye comes in to offer valuable support.
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Image: An ambulance is driving on a long, wet motorway; Copyright: panthermedia.net/BrianAJackson

Emergency medicine: how telemedicine strengthens the chain of survival

02.07.2018

You have probably heard of the chain of survival. It refers to a series of collaborative actions taken by first responders, emergency response systems, and emergency departments to ensure emergency medical services. However, at times, this chain of survival is too long when emergency vehicles have to travel great distances for example.
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Image: Female hospital employee with green OR cap is wearing AR glasses, a screen is floating in front of her; Copyright: IT4process GmbH

Augmented Reality: supporting sterile processing services?

08.06.2018

Every day, hospital staff has to manage complex processes to guarantee quality and patient safety. Yet in some areas, the use of checklists and manuals tends to be more cumbersome and not useful – as is the case in sterile processing. A new project studies how augmented reality can take all the necessary information into the staff's field of view.
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Image: Young woman is sitting under a tree in the park and uses her smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/geargodz

eHealth and mHealth – smart helpers for people with depression

01.06.2018

Smartphones have become our everyday companions. A lot of people are critical of this: On the one hand, they connect us to everything and everybody, on the other hand, we lack time and concentration for personal contacts and our surroundings because of them. Still, smartphones and other wearables are a great asset for medicine, as they help people to stay healthy or to manage a chronic illness.
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Image: Man with mobile phone sitting on the floor in front of a sofa; Copyright: panthermedia.net/yacobchuk1

From data to diagnosis – digital help for depression

01.06.2018

Few diseases are as difficult to diagnose as depression. What's more, outsiders often don't perceive it as a disease. The reason for this are symptoms that are not directly visible. Sufferers of the disease tend to experience fear, worry, and despair in everyday life, when no doctor is present. This is the starting point for telemedicine tools such as online programs or smartphone apps.
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Digital therapist – data protection for depression apps

01.06.2018

The number of people suffering from depression worldwide is steadily increasing – as is the digitization in all areas of life. There is a wide variety of applications designed to make it easier to cope with this disorder. However, patients have to provide very sensitive information when they use these digital therapists. And in doing so, they often divulge more than they realize.
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Image: A woman is looking at her smartphone in bed. She looks tired and exhausted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/leungchopan

The STEADY project: Managing depression with wearables

01.06.2018

These days, smartphones and wearables of all kinds more or less "incidentally" collect lots of personal data about our lives. Many people have privacy and security concerns – and rightfully so – especially if mountains of data fall into the wrong hands. But what if patients collect their own data and get help to use it for their own purposes?
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Image: Dr. Betsch next to a computer screen showing scans of the spine; Copyright: privat

Light and Bluetooth – dynamic measurement techniques for orthopedics

02.05.2018

X-rays for diagnostic imaging and therapy evaluation are still the norm in orthopedics. Meanwhile, patients who frequently need X-rays are repeatedly exposed to radiation. That's why the University Hospital RWTH Aachen uses and develops methods that are not just radiation-free but can also capture motions.
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Hospital logistics – Digitization meets manual labor

16.04.2018

Countless items and products have to get to the right destination in a hospital every day. A complex process runs behind all this, where nothing works without digitization. Still, it also involves a good amount of manual labor. We went behind the scenes to see how hospital logistics work at the University Hospital Knappschaftskrankenhaus in Bochum and the Buttkereit Company in Dortmund.
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Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09.04.2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
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Image: young woman with VR-glasses in the VR-Lab, in front of it a young man at a computer, on which a virtual heart can be seen; Copyright: Kompetenzzentrum eLearning in der Medizin Baden-Württemberg

VR Lab for medical students: linking theory and practice

22.03.2018

Virtual reality and medicine are increasingly mentioned in the same context. In addition to the development of applications that support the treatment of patients suffering from chronic pain and anxiety, this technology also benefits medical staff. Two months ago, the Ulm University Hospital has opened the VR Lab, where medical students can train and learn with the help of 3D organs.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08.03.2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Surgical navigation systems – with precision to the destination

06.03.2018

With the help of surgical navigation systems, prostheses or implants can be better inserted. During the procedure, surgeons can see exactly where they need to operate on a screen. Just like a navigation system in the car, navigation in the OR guides you precisely to your destination. At the Uniklinik RWTH Aachen we can find out what advantages this has for physicians and patients.
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Image: Hospital warehouse in which a woman with a coat, clipboard and shopping carts is standing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/.shock

Of streams and flows – the importance of hospital logistics

01.02.2018

In a hospital, the well-being of patients has top priority. In order to ensure this, medical, sterile and food supplies must be provided quickly and efficiently. Every day in the hospital therefore requires a logistical masterpiece. Digital solutions and automated technologies are particularly useful for storing, ordering, transporting and disposing various products.
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01.02.2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Image: OR nurse is standing in front of a screen and holds surgical pincers in her hand; Copyright: ASANUS Medizintechnik GmbH

Eye on material flow: network solutions for hospital logistics

01.02.2018

Hospitals need an accurate assessment of the location and quantity of their materials to eliminate sources of error. Automated processes can also help employees to make these materials available at the right time and at the right place. Digital network systems will substantially support the logistics in the hospital of the future.
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Hospital logistics: guarantor of quality and efficiency

01.02.2018

Medical supply distribution, supplying operating rooms with sterile instrument kits, the provision of food and catering services for patients – these are some of the around-the-clock care processes at a hospital. Efficient logistics are crucial to guarantee smooth processes. All of these pieces ultimately come together at the hospital’s in-house logistics center.
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Patient science: patients research cystic fibrosis

22.01.2018

Research does not always occur in laboratory settings. As part of citizen science, citizens collect data and make it available for research projects. Now, this approach is also adopted in medicine by way of patient science: in a new project, patients take part in cystic fibrosis research. The goal is to improve the lives of those who are affected by this chronic disease.
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Image: OR with very modern equipment; Copyright; Swen Reichhold

OR of the future: Surgical navigation systems and integrated devices

04.01.2018

While it is commonplace for operating room staff to work together as a team, the collaboration of operating room systems does not always work so well – many devices are still separated from one another, causing the OR processes to be prone to mistakes. The same applies to surgical navigation technologies that represent the interface between imaging, the surgeon and therapeutic devices.
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jumpBALL – thrombosis prophylaxis easy as child's play

12.12.2017

Improving people's health with wearable technologies – that's the goal of mHealth. We are visiting the University of Kaiserslautern and the wearHEALTH workgroup, which develops these types of mobile health services with funding from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Here, we get to try the game jumpBALL that has been developed by wearHEALTH to support thrombosis prophylaxis.
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Image: A hand touches a smartphone camera that is measuring the heart rate with an app; Copyright: Preventicus GmbH

"Preventicus Heartbeats": An app that's a clinically validated medical device

01.12.2017

Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Yet many incidences of stroke are preventable since they are frequently associated with an undetected abnormal heart rhythm. In this case, patients can benefit from using the clinically validated "Preventicus Heartbeats" app, which measures and documents the heart rhythm with a smartphone camera.
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Digital medicine – eHealth and mHealth at MEDICA 2017

15.11.2017

Today, hardly any other sector is as diverse as the information and communication technology. Medicine has been benefitting from this for a long time now. There is a wide variety of digital products for hospitals, medical staff or patients. From small helpers for mobile applications to complex systems – you will find it all at MEDICA 2017.
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Hospital care: understanding IT as a tool

15.11.2017

With the increasing digitization, care is undergoing radical change. Irene Maier spoke with us about the advantages of information technology for staff and hospitals. She is the congress president of the German Hospital Conference and opened the forum "Care in Hospitals" at MEDICA 2017 on Wednesday.
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On the way to a smart hospital - Interview with Bosch

15.11.2017

Optimized processes, efficient communication technology and intelligent analysis methods - the modern hospital is increasingly turning into a smart hospital. Specific technologies and models can contribute to this development. There are already numerous innovations in the field of IT and communications technology that support this trend. We will learn more at the Bosch stand at MEDICA 2017.
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Health-i Award: The best ideas for the health of tomorrow

15.11.2017

The digitalisation of the health care system is making great strides forward. In order to give further impetus to this trend, the Health-i Award brings together experts from business, science and health. In the MEDICA ECON FORUM by TK three promising start-ups were presented.
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The MEDICA START-UP PARK: spotlight on young companies

14.11.2017

What's UP? This year, a piece of the future of digital health is shown for the first time in the MEDICA START-UP PARK. Here, young companies can present themselves and establish the contacts they need in the world of medicine to promote their innovations.
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Serious Games - getting healthy while playing games

14.11.2017

Gaming is an activity that children as well as adults enjoy. They are fun and challenge our stamina. That’s why serious games are increasingly becoming popluar in physiotherapy and rehabilitation. MEDICA 2017 demonstrates already what applications are available here.
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Managing epilepsy with the Smartwatch – Interview with Qolware

13.11.2017

Epilepsy attacks are usually unexpected and can quickly become dangerous for patients travelling alone. A new Smartwatch addresses this problem and promises to remedy it. We take a look at the smart assistant that Qolware will be presenting at MEDICA 2017.
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MEDICA 2017: Cutting-edge, look into the future

13.11.2017

For exhibitors and visitors, MEDICA 2017 does not start until Monday. However, the trade press already gets a preview of some selected product highlights on the Sunday before the trade fair. We were there with the camera and met with some exhibitors. They gave us the opportunity to present cutting-edge products and to take a look at the medical technology of the future.
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A look at the medicine of tomorrow – At MEDICA Preview in Hamburg

08.11.2017

Every year in September, MEDICA Preview takes place at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf. It is intended to give visitors, exhibitors and the trade press a foretaste of MEDICA in November and tomorrow's medicine. This year, we were on the scene with our camera to learn more about opto genetics, smart hospitals and the support of patients with multiple organ failure.
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Image: A man is standing outdoors while typing on his smart watch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/guniamc

mHealth: how mobile choices can successfully reach users

02.10.2017

mHealth has been slated to revolutionize the healthcare market for the past few years. Yet things are not quite as easy for apps and wearables as it may seem. A recently conducted study reveals that there are still many obstacles to overcome before manufacturers and health professionals can connect with patients and their mobile devices.
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Image: Male hands keep Smartwatch and Smartphone with the same health application side by side; Copyright: panthermedia. net/Alexey Boldin

mHealth: Doctor in your pocket

02.10.2017

Since the eHealth Law took effect on January 1, 2016, it has become apparent that digitization also affects the healthcare system. Its objective is to improve the digital infrastructure of healthcare. For several years, a subcategory of electronic healthcare solutions has enjoyed increasing popularity: mHealth.
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Image: Man who is blowing into a smartphone adapter for breath tests; Copyright: THM/Gross/Sohrabi

AST@home: A rapid respiratory test for COPD using the smartphone

02.10.2017

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often requires a detailed documentation of the course. As part of the AST@home project, Professor Keywan Sohrabi and Professor Volker Groß at the THM developed an app that enables the monitoring of the course of COPD via smartphone and includes family members or nursing staff.
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Picture: View over the shoulder of a female doctor using a health app on a smartphone; in front of her lies a tablet and a stetoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

mHealth: The disease management of tomorrow

02.10.2017

Life is becoming more and more digital. This trend is also reflected in the health care system. Chronically ill patients are a popular and constantly growing target group for the mobile health market. How can patients and doctors benefit from such health treatments? What risks do they entail? We will get to the bottom of these and other questions in our Topic of the Month.
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ICAROS VR - Training and Prevention in Virtual Reality

31.08.2017

The term gamification refers to the application of elements of game playing in non-game contexts, for example, to encourage participants to engage in a task that is otherwise deemed too monotonous. We are visiting the German Sport University Cologne to interview Dr. Boris Feodoroff, who together with his team is testing a training device.
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Image: A woman is wearing an exoskeleton of Hocoma and playing a videogame; Copyright: beta-web/Brockmann

New technologies in physiotherapy

01.06.2017

Exoskeletons for arms, hands and legs, videogames that motivate to move or a combination of both: More and more new technologies are being used in physiotherapy and rehabilitation, even in the home environment. They have in common that they support patients and therapists. Learn more about the use of sensor technology, robotics and more in our Topic of the Month June.
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Image: In a movement laboratory, a man is wearing sensors on his legs and armst, while walking. During this he is being recorded and observed; Copyright: DAS BILD für ZHAW Gesundheit

"XoSoft" Project – Wearable Intelligent Exoskeleton

01.06.2017

After a stroke or as a result of aging, there are many situations when people are impaired in their walking ability and rely on a personal assistant or auxiliary aids and services. The XoSoft Project offers a solution: a soft exoskeleton that can be worn like a pair of leggings and stiffens or softens, depending on the situation.
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Image: Several people use the Armeo system and playing a videogame with it; Copyright: Hocoma, Schweiz

Exoskeletons, Serious Games and Co.: New Technologies in Rehabilitation

01.06.2017

A stroke, an accident or just because you are aging – there are many reasons to take advantage of physiotherapeutic or rehabilitative measures. More and more new technologies are designed to support patients in this process. They run the gamut from sensor technology and robotics to exergames and virtual reality.
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Image: Two elderly are sitting beside each other, looking on a screen, where a bingo game can be seen. One woman is standing up; Copyright: SilverFit, Robert ten Berge

SilverFit – Training and gaming for the elderly

01.06.2017

Movement is good for health, but people do it less and less as they age. The Dutch company SilverFit wants to counteract this. Their devices that combine sport and game are primarily aimed at elderly people. Their goal: to give people joy, fun and motivation to move – both in rehabilitation and in daily life.
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Image: Different medical pictograms; Copyright: panthermedia.net/aimage

Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01.03.2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Image: Graphic of the generic architectur of the clinical data intelligence;  FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Medizinische Fakultät

Medical Databases: One for All, All for One

01.03.2017

In the "KDI – Clinical Data Intelligence Project", researchers are trying to consolidate various types of data to make them useable and useful to both medical professionals and scientists. This is a tremendous undertaking, considering the data volumes from different sources. In this conversation with MEDICA, Dr. Martin Sedlmayr explains the project setup.
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Image: Digital medical symbols. A physician is tapping on a symbol; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Big Data – Benefit for the medical sector

01.03.2017

The worldwide amount of digital data doubles every two years. In the medical sector, too, data is not only becoming bigger but is also becoming more. In addition to "classical" patient data like blood parameters or medication, patients' genomes are playing a more and more important role. But how can these data mountains be utilized, how is Big Data evolving to Smart Data?
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Image: A monitor and different displays in the OR, behind this the OR team; Copyright: panthermedia.net/chanawit

Smart versus big: how data can assist in the OR

01.03.2017

The OR is the centerpiece of every hospital and also the most expensive resource that should be used efficiently. Yet in reality, there are often delays when interventions are not intelligently scheduled and take place back-to-back. This is why the InnOPlan Research Consortium wants to make surgical device data usable and useful to improve the operating room planning process.
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Image: Detail of the app on a mobile phone; Copyright: Sonormed GmbH

Medical Device that fits in your pocket: music for Tinnitus relief

08.02.2017

Listening to your favorite music for at least 90 minutes a day and treating your tinnitus with it? Almost sounds too good to be true. Yet more and more German statutory health insurance providers pay for this treatment. We wanted to know more about it and spoke with Jörg Land, the CEO of Sonormed GmbH, about Tinnitracks.
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Image: Two people are sitting in a room, looking at a screen; Copyright: Rhön-Klinikum, ZTM Bad Kissingenrmedia.net/SimpleFoto

Project TeleView – Telemedicine for refugees

23.01.2017

Refugees who come to Germany struggle with language and cultural barriers – also when it comes to medical issues. Patients are often not able to state their medical history or acute conditions, which requires extra time and means increased costs for medical offices and shelters. The telemedicine project TeleView seeks to offer a solution to this problem.
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Telemedicine – Immediate and lower-cost care

12.01.2017

Long waiting times in medical practices are not a rarity. The telemedicine can provide remedy. The program of the Institute for Applied Telemedicine at the Heart and Diabetes Center NRW in Bad Oeynhausen is aimed primarily at chronically ill people. Daily, they send their body values via telecommunication to the institute.
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