News about laboratory equipment / diagnostic tests -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: A laboratory worker performs a blood test; Copyright: seventyfourimages

seventyfourimages

Dementia: Blood levels could point to early loss of neuronal connections

01/07/2022

Researchers from DZNE and Ulm University Hospital have identified a protein in the blood that may indicate the degradation of neural connections years before the onset of dementia symptoms.
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Image: Blut sample in a test tube; Copyright: gpointstudio

gpointstudio

New blood biomarker identified for status of fatty liver disease

29/06/2022

A MedUni Vienna study team has identified the role of a specific subtype of macrophages (white blood cells) in progressive non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Image: Doctor checks an elderly gentleman's eye health with a beam of light; Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

New hope for a therapy against retinitis pigmentosa

27/06/2022

Retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative genetic disease of the eye, is characterized by progressive vision loss, usually leading to blindness.
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Image: A nurse takes care of a person with parkinson; Copyright: bialasiewicz

bialasiewicz

Prospect of blood test for Parkinson’s disease for the first time

24/06/2022

A research team at the Faculty of Medicine at Kiel University has developed a method that reliably detects protein changes in blood that are typical of Parkinson's disease.
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Image: Scientist working in a laboratory; Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

New material paves the way for remote-controlled medication and electronic pills

23/06/2022

Biomedicines are produced by living cells and are used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases among other things. One challenge is that the medicines are very expensive to produce, something that limits global access. Now researchers from Chalmers have invented a material that uses electrical signals to capture and release biomolecules.
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Image: Man during a neurological examination ; Copyright: engagestock

engagestock

Protein changes in the liquor indicate inflammatory processes in the brain

23/06/2022

Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases are associated with inflammatory processes in the brain. German researchers have succeeded in identifying a group of proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid that could provide information about such inflammatory processes.
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Image: Newborn baby in the hospital bed; Copyright: Image-Source

Image-Source

Rapid whole genome sequencing improves diagnosis in critically ill infants

21/06/2022

Children who are born severely ill or who develop serious illness in the first few weeks of life are often difficult to diagnose, with considerable implications for their short and longer-term care.
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New Oncohematology products

20/06/2022

Clonit, Innovation and Passion to serve Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) diagnosis and monitoring. We are pleased to announce the recent introduction of the new Oncohematology line of...
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Image: Empty laboratory tubes for diagnosis of coronavirus disease; Copyright: rawf8

rawf8

Rapid test to measure immunity to COVID-19

17/06/2022

New blood assay provides critical information for revaccination strategies in vulnerable individuals.
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Bild: A man in glasses and a jacket, Ludovic Vallier, poses for the camera ; Copyright: BIH/David Ausserhofer

BIH/David Ausserhofer

Ludovic Vallier grows liver tissue from stem cells

16/06/2022

Effective July 1, 2022, Ludovic Vallier will take up the W3 Einstein Strategic Professorship for Stem Cells in Regenerative Therapies at the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH).
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Image: A smiling man is sitting behind a laboratory device; Copyright: Universität Bielefeld/M.-D. Müller

Universität Bielefeld/M.-D. Müller

Making drug interactions in the liver visible

15/06/2022

Bielefeld University is coordinating a new EU-research project that seeks to produce microscopic liver tissue cultures that can survive for 14 days, while also using imaging methods to investigate how liver cells react to combinations of different medications.
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Image: A hand is holding an object tray with the word “coronavirus” on it in front of a microscope and a screen; Copyright: mstandret

mstandret

Identifying viruses more quickly

14/06/2022

The research project NanoXCAN involving Leibniz Universität Hannover aims to revolutionize virus imaging technology. The European Commission is funding the project with around 4 million euros. Every hospital could benefit, as a rapid and reliable identification of viral subtypes can save lives.
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Image: Man in a suit and glasses poses for the camera; Copyright: Klaus Nagels

Klaus Nagels

Precise blood diagnostics improve treatment outcome for lung cancer

10/06/2022

Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a particularly aggressive type of lung cancer. Tumor cells and tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the blood of patients with the disease can be analyzed by means of liquid biopsy throughout the course of the disease.
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Image: Close-up of a newborn baby; Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

Genetic testing for neonatal epilepsy allows babies to go home sooner

09/06/2022

Genetic testing results in lower length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for infants with epilepsy, according to a study published in the journal Pediatric Neurology.
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Image: Colored cells that are marked with arrows; Copyright: Paula Heinke

Paula Heinke

Your liver is just under three years old

07/06/2022

The liver has a unique ability to regenerate after damage. However, it was unknown whether this ability decreases as we age. International scientists led by Dr. Olaf Bergmann at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden used a technique known as retrospective radiocarbon birth dating to determine the age of the human liver.
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Image: Drawing of a liver that is connected to a magnifying glass by colorful circles; Copyright: Lili Niu © Novo Nordisk Foundation, Center for Protein Research

Lili Niu © Novo Nordisk Foundation, Center for Protein Research

Early diagnosis of liver diseases by proteomics

06/06/2022

Two or three drinks every day could put your liver in danger. Using proteomics and machine learning, researchers now present a revolutionary tool to predict whether an individual has alcohol-related liver disease and if an individual patient is at risk of disease progression.
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Image: A photographed pregnancy belly, Copyright: UCLA Health

UCLA Health

Biomarker panel could help predict gestational diabetes

31/05/2022

UCLA researchers have taken the initial step in identifying what may be an effective way to detect gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) earlier in pregnancy, potentially improving diagnosis and treatment for what is the most common disorder of pregnancy.
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Image: Researcher doing lab tests on white blood cell samples; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

Magnetic device isolates rarest white blood cells

27/05/2022

Across the world, food allergies are on the rise. One of the most important cells in studying this ailment are basophils, which activate inflammation and other responses to allergens such as rashes, and sometimes, anaphylaxis.
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Image: Drawn schematic of a work flow in a laboratory; Copyright: Juliet Percival/MPI für Biochemie

Juliet Percival/MPI für Biochemie

New method revolutionizes cancer diagnosis

24/05/2022

A German-Danish team led by Prof. Matthias Mann has developed a ground-breaking technology called 'Deep Visual Proteomics'. This method provides researchers and clinicians with a protein read-out to understand cancer at single cell-type resolution. The technology was published in the journal Nature Biotechnology and demonstrates its potential in a first application to cancer cells.
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Image: Locus coeruleus as observed in a 7T MRI scanner ; Copyright: University of Cambridge

University of Cambridge

Brain scanners: Hope for treating cognitive symptoms in Parkinson’s

23/05/2022

Ultra-powerful 7T MRI scanners could be used to help identify those patients with Parkinson’s disease and similar conditions most likely to benefit from new treatments for previously-untreatable symptoms, say scientists.
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A diagram intended to illustrate genetic manipulation of the female reproductive tract ; Copyright: AG Chumduri

AG Chumduri

Cervix: Research progress thanks to mini organs

23/05/2022

Life-like organ replicas - so-called 3D organoids - are a good way to research disease processes. A team from the University of Würzburg has now presented a kind of blueprint for such a model of the cervix.
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Image: A three-dimensional view of cell activities of skin cancer squamous cell carcinoma.; Copyright: M. Schober/E. Fuchs, Rockefeller University

M. Schober/E. Fuchs, Rockefeller University

New method melds data to make a 3-D map of cells’ activities

20/05/2022

HZI researchers develop molecular probes to detect pathogens in clinical samples.
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Image: Electron micrograph of Staphylococcus aureus; Copyright: HZI/Manfred Rohde

HZI/Manfred Rohde

A bright spot for microbiological diagnostics

19/05/2022

HZI researchers develop molecular probes to detect pathogens in clinical samples.
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Image: Assembly of biochips with attached tubes; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen

Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen

Process chains for isolation and analysis: from single cells to organoids

17/05/2022

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT are working on new tools for the preparation and analysis of single cells and cell assemblies. The team developed the "Liftoscope", a system for cell sorting for subsequent cultivation that can analyze and transfer biomaterials precisely and in a way that is gentle on cells.
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Image: Female nurse looks at results on computer; Copyright: engagestock

engagestock

New computational tool to interpret clinical significance of cancer mutations

12/05/2022

The software, called CancerVar, standardizes procedures to help researchers assess the clinical impacts of over 13 million somatic cancer mutations.
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Image: Two white laboratory devices with black lids; Copyright: HiperScan

HiperScan

Fagron acquires majority share of Fraunhofer IPMS' spin-off HiperScan

10/05/2022

Fagron, a leading global company active in pharmaceutical compounding, announced on April 14th the acquisition of HiperScan, the German market leader for reliable raw material identification in pharmacies. HiperScan is a spin-off of Fraunhofer IPMS and the German market leader for reliable and secure identification of starting materials in pharmacies.
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Image: Shaopeng Wang poses for the camera; Copyright: The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University

The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University

A sharper image for proteins

05/05/2022

To fully understand proteins and their myriad functions, researchers have developed sophisticated means to see and study them using advanced microscopy, enhanced light detection, imaging software and the integration of advanced hardware systems. A new study from Arizona State University describes a new technique that promises to revolutionize the imaging of proteins and other vital biomolecules.
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Image: The new multi-organ chip is shown; Copyright: Kacey Ronaldson-Bouchard/Columbia Engineering

Kacey Ronaldson-Bouchard/Columbia Engineering

Plug-and-play organ-on-a-chip can be customized to the patient

05/05/2022

Major advance from Columbia Engineering team demonstrates first multi-organ chip made of engineered human tissues linked by vascular flow for improved modeling of systemic diseases like cancer
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Image: MRI scan of patient's head, neck and brain; Copyright: Nikita_Karchevskyi

Nikita_Karchevskyi

Subgroups of glioblastoma associated with disease prognosis

02/05/2022

Researchers have detected different subgroups of the brain tumour form glioblastoma, where the cancer cells’ properties depend on which cell type they originate from. The used analysis method could also separate glioblastoma patients with significant differences in survival. The findings open up for identifying specific therapeutic targets for the new subgroups of glioblastoma.
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Image: Researchers in a laboratory; Copyright: Freya Lücke, UKSH

Freya Lücke, UKSH

Leukaemia: Previously unknown risk factors in adulthood

29/04/2022

New research from the Clinical Research Unit "CATCH ALL" at Kiel University and UKSH identifies genetic causes for treatment resistance in BCP-ALL.
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Image: Dr. Fabian Eichelmann poses for the camera; Copyright: Carolin Schrandt

Carolin Schrandt

Lipidomics provides new biomarkers for cardiovascular disease and Type 2 Diabetes

27/04/2022

Using lipidomics, a modern analytical method, the team led by Dr. Fabian Eichelmann from DIfE and DZD identified those lipids that are statistically associated with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.
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Image: Three men and one woman in an OR - Bernd Auber, Alexander von Gise, Michael Sasse, Bettina Bohnhorst; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Rare diseases: rapid diagnosis instead of a long odyssey

26/04/2022

Can the treatment of seriously ill children with rare diseases be improved by rapid genetic diagnosis? This question is being investigated by a team from Pediatrics and Human Genetics at Hannover Medical School (MHH) in the "Baby Lion" study. The focus is on decoding the genome, i.e. the entire genetic information of a human being, in just a few days.
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Image: Three men and for women – the team of Clickmer Systems; Copyright: Sandra Todaro/WFEG Rheinbach

Sandra Todaro/WFEG Rheinbach

Diagnostics: successful spin-off from the University of Bonn and LSI

26/04/2022

The British company APIS Assay Technologies Ltd has acquired the University of Bonn's spin-off project Clickmer Systems, which was further developed at the Life Science Inkubator (LSI), for a single-digit million euro sum. The startup is developing clickmers as a synthetic alternative to antibodies that can be utilized in research and medical diagnostics.
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Image: A PCR diagnostic kit; Copyright: felipecaparros

felipecaparros

Technology transfer award for PCR rapid test device for infection diagnostics

25/04/2022

Spindiag GmbH, together with the University of Freiburg and the Hahn-Schickard-Gesellschaft für angewandte Forschung e.V., was awarded the Technology Transfer Prize 2020 from the German Physical Society (DPG) on April 09, 2022 for the development of the PCR-based rapid test system Rhonda.
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Image: View over the shoulder of a female laboratory technician who is filling a sample into a vial; Copyright: friends_stock

friends_stock

World Laboratory Day 2022: Celebrate your lab!

22/04/2022

Drugs, vaccines, pathogen vulnerabilities, information about genetics and genetic material - the cornerstones of modern medicine are laid in research laboratories. And without efficient laboratory diagnostics, we would not be able to detect and treat a wide range of diseases. Two reasons to celebrate laboratories and the people who work there.
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Image: Microscope image: damage to lung tissue caused by the invasive fungal infection aspergillosis.; Copyright: Zoltán Cseresnyés/Leibniz-HKI

Zoltán Cseresnyés/Leibniz-HKI

How do fungal infections spread in the human lung?

22/04/2022

A chip model allows us to observe growth in the tissue.
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Image: Scientist fills microplates ; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Want to 3D print a kidney? Start by thinking small

21/04/2022

Stevens computational model aims to accelerate microfluidic bio-printing that opens up a pathway for 3D printing any kind of organ at any time.
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Image: A smiling man with glasses, beard and blue jacket – Dr. Michael Kreutz; Copyright: Unimedizin Magdeburg

Unimedizin Magdeburg

HFSP funding to study synaptic lipid signatures

19/04/2022

The astonishing capacity of the brain to process and store information crucially relies on properly functioning synapses. They provide the connecting entities within neural circuits and their properties define circuit function.
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Image: A woman testing covid; Copyright: Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA

Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA

UGA team develops faster, cheaper COVID tests

18/04/2022

University of Georgia nanotechnology research group entered the race to develop a rapid test for COVID-19 in August 2020, running experiments on a new sensor for an American manufacturing company.
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Image: The motherboard of a COVID-19 rapid testing device; Copyright: Photo courtesy of Houndstoothe Analytics.

Photo courtesy of Houndstoothe Analytics

Highly accurate, 30-second coronavirus test

15/04/2022

Researchers at the University of Florida, however, have helped developed a COVID-19 testing device that can detect coronavirus infection in as little as 30 seconds as sensitively and accurately as a PCR, or polymerase chain reaction test, the gold standard of testing.
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Image: Example of the microcapilliary strips loaded with samples; Copyright: Sarah Needs, Cygnus smartphone testing technology

Sarah Needs, Cygnus smartphone testing technology

Dengue detection smartphone tech shows new hope for low-cost diagnostics

14/04/2022

Accurate home testing could be used for a wider range of illnesses, as new research shows the capability of smartphone-powered tests for Dengue Fever.
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Image: Device for single particle combinatorial lipidic nanocontainer fusion dots; Copyright: Nikos Hatzakis, University of Copenhagen

Nikos Hatzakis, University of Copenhagen

Revolutionary tool will meet future pandemics with accelerated response

07/04/2022

A new tool speeds up development of vaccines and other pharmaceutical products by more than one million times while minimizing costs.
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Image: A bluely colored tissue sample with bright green dots; Copyright: Team Wolfgang Kastenmüller/Universität Würzburg

Team Wolfgang Kastenmüller/Universität Würzburg

Immune system 'sentinel' cells key to immunotherapy

05/04/2022

The presence of dendritic cells, so-called 'sentinel' immune cells, is vital to maintain and regulate the balance of the body's immune response. Researchers have discovered an essential role of these cells in the treatment of cancer and severe viral infections.
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Image: MediSCAPE imaging of the living human tongue. Copyright: Kripa Patel-Hillman Lab/Columbia Engineering

Kripa Patel-Hillman Lab/Columbia Engineering

New technology could make biopsies a thing of the past

04/04/2022

MediSCAPE, a high-speed 3D microscope designed by Columbia Engineers, can see real-time cellular detail in living tissues to guide surgery, speed up tissue analyses, and improve treatments
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: Blood sample labelled

panthermedia.net/olanstock

Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08/11/2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04/11/2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04/11/2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23/09/2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01/08/2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01/08/2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08/07/2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22/03/2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01/03/2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01/02/2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02/01/2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Glucometer next to a smartphone that shows the blood glucose level; Copyright: panthermedia.net/simpson33

DiaDigital: making sense of diabetes apps

02/01/2019

While they are very useful, health apps have one major drawback: anyone can release and distribute them unchecked. Only some apps require medical device certification. So how can users spot a great, safe and useful app? When it comes to diabetes apps, the “DiaDigital” seal of distinction is the answer.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02/01/2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09/07/2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image:

Empa

"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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