The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Man looking at MRI scan; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Ischukigor

MRI and AI can detect early signs of tumor cell death after novel therapy

02/12/2021

A team led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has demonstrated ​​that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to detect early signs of tumor cell death in response to a novel virus-based cancer therapy.
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Image: red marked liver in the human body; Copyright: PantherMedia  / sciencepics

New PET imaging-based tool detects liver inflammation from fatty liver disease

01/12/2021

A UC Davis Health team has developed a first-of-its-kind positron emission tomography (PET) scan imaging-based tool to detect liver inflammation in patients affected with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Image: Neuronal cell nuclei of the dentus gyratus and associated blood vessels; Copyright: M. Eckermann/T. Salditt

X-ray image throws light on neurodegenerative disease

29/11/2021

Researchers at the University of Göttingen and University Medical Center Göttingen have now found a new technique to measure and quantify neuronal tissue architecture in three dimensions and at high resolution, which enabled them to identify changes in neurons in Alzheimer's.
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Image: Dr. Jens Bankstahl and Professor Dr. Tobias Ross; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Better images for science

25/11/2021

In order to detect and research diseases, it is important to look inside the body. For this purpose, there are various imaging methods – from ultrasound examinations to X-rays and computer tomography. Molecular imaging provides a particularly precise insight, showing biological processes and organ functions "live".
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Image: Fluorescence images of living neuron co-expressing a fluorescent protein  and click-labeled auxiliary protein TARP; Copyright: Choquet group and Beliu group

New method makes masked proteins in nerve cells visible

23/11/2021

An international team of scientists developed a new method and visualized specific receptor proteins in nerve cells that are important for learning. The results were published in the renowned journal Nature Communications.
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Image: Professor Sir John Burn and Ms Rachel Phelps; Copyright: National Cancer Research Institute

Simple and cheap urine test can detect urothelial cancers in Lynch Syndrome patients

12/11/2021

Researchers have shown for the first time that it is possible to detect signs of urothelial cancer using a simple, postal, urine test in Lynch Syndrome (LS) patients who are at high risk of developing tumours.
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Image: Dr. Kolja Them and a MRI machine; Copyright: MOIN CC, Uni Kiel

Progress in the imaging of metabolic processes

11/11/2021

A research team in Kiel has developed new contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging in order to be able to make biochemical processes visible.
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Image: Professor Dr. Danny Jonigk and Christopher Werlein; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

New X-ray technique shows vascular damage in intact COVID-19 lungs for first time

05/11/2021

When the coronavirus enters the lung, it causes massive tissue damage. Now, an international research team has been able to demonstrate for the first time, using a highly innovative X-ray technique in a non-destructive manner, that severe COVID-19 causes massive remodelling of the finest blood vessels by causing normally separate blood systems to join together with unusual frequency.
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Image: Lung phantom lab bench setup with capillary array and GASMAS probes; Copyright: A. Pacheco, TNI

Lung model proves viability of spectroscopy technique

02/11/2021

Take a nice, deep breath. Now imagine your lungs: myriad airways like branches, each with tiny alveoli like leaves. This alveolar structure is key to the absorption of oxygen and excretion of carbon dioxide that we call "breath." As we breathe, the volume of gases in the lungs is continually changing with varying degrees of inhalation and exhalation.
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Image: Different types of images; Copyright: Nina Shvetsova et al./IEEE Access

Artificial intelligence spots anomalies in medical images

22/10/2021

Scientists from Skoltech, Philips Research, and Goethe University Frankfurt have trained a neural network to detect anomalies in medical images to assist physicians in sifting through countless scans in search of pathologies. Reported in ​​IEEE Access, the new method is adapted to the nature of medical imaging and is more successful in spotting abnormalities than general-purpose solutions.
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Image: a robot arm holding a small glass; Copyright: PantherMedia / Bork

The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization

01/10/2021

In the laboratory, there is some work that is time-consuming and monotonous – making it the perfect place for digital solutions such as artificial intelligence or robotics. But what work can these systems really take on in a meaningful way, in which areas of the lab are they present today, and where do they still need to be improved?
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Image: UV Visual Lift; Copyright: by UVentions

Hygiene: Smart protection against pathogens like the coronavirus

23/03/2020

Germs such as bacteria, viruses or pathogenic fungi can spread from one person to another through direct contact when we shake hands or touch objects. People touch door handles and push elevator buttons in public places and constantly move in and out of spaces. Regular manual high-level disinfection is practically impossible. UVentions GmbH has found an intelligent solution for this problem.
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Image: Two screens with picture of the circulatory system in a catheter laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

MEDICA TECH FORUM: light-based imaging technique OCT

04/11/2019

Since its inception, MEDICA TECH FORUM has focused on the implementation of innovations and new technologies into clinical practice. 2019 marks the tenth year of the Forum. In honor of its anniversary, we will brighten things up a bit, as one of the focal points will highlight how optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light to produce images.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01/08/2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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