Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019 -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: A Woman with a wearable; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Researchers stimulate the vision of a blind person

21/10/2021

A new brain implant based on intracortical microelectrodes can allow a blind person to see shapes and letters. New research by the Miguel Hernández Univresity shows that the implantation of this micro device in the human brain can be done safely, and that the direct stimulation of the cerebral cortex produces visual perceptions with a much higher resolution than had been achieved until now.
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Image: A Man and a Woman with a Smartphone; Copyright: Universitat Politècnica de València

A new app monitors cancer patients' quality of life

21/10/2021

A team from the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) has developed a new mobile application that facilitates the continuous monitoring of the quality of life of cancer patients. The app, called Lalaby, allows the patients' day-to-day life to be monitored from the information collected by sensors located in their mobile phone and other sources stored therein.
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Image: Human Head and Brain with different waveforms in the background; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Andreus

Brain 'noise' may hold the keys to psychiatric treatment efficacy

20/10/2021

It remains a central challenge in psychiatry to reliably judge whether a patient will respond to treatment. In a new study researchers show that moment-to-moment fluctuations in brain activity can reliably predict whether patients with social anxiety disorder will be receptive to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).
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Image: Muthukumaran Packirisamy; Copyright: Concordia University

Concordia researchers develop a new way to find cancer at the nanometre scale

20/10/2021

Diagnosing and treating cancer can be a race against time. By the time the disease is diagnosed in a patient, all too often it is advanced and able to spread throughout the body, decreasing chances of survival. Early diagnosis is key to stopping it.
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Image: Dr Christian Schultze-Florey and Dr Ivan Odak with blood serum samples in front of a flow cytometer; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

New values for better diagnoses

19/10/2021

Lymphocytes belong to the white blood cells. They consist of several subgroups with different tasks in immune defence. Which and how many lymphocytes are in the blood provides information about our current state of health as well as congenital or acquired immune deficiencies. This composition in the blood can be determined precisely with the help of the most modern flow cytometry.
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Image: Researchers at Icahn School of Medicine developed an electrocardiogram-reading algorithm that can detect subtle signs of heart failure; Copyright: Glicksberg and Nadkarni labs

Scientists show how AI may spot unseen signs of heart failure

19/10/2021

A special artificial intelligence (AI)-based computer algorithm created by Mount Sinai researchers was able to learn how to identify subtle changes in electrocardiograms (also known as ECGs or EKGs) to predict whether a patient was experiencing heart failure.
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Image: Professor Thomas Vorup-Jensen and Postdoc Kristian Juul Madsen; Copyright: Simon Byrial Fischel

New technique identifies pathogenic particles in the blood

18/10/2021

Autoimmune diseases – that is diseases where our own immune system damages the body – are growing, but we know little about what triggers them. Researchers are now a step closer to finding an explanation. With the help of a new technique, researchers from Aarhus University have succeeded in identifying the particles in the blood that determine the development of autoimmune diseases.
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Image: DETI mapping results from the brain of a person viewing one of the stimuli used in the experiment; Copyright: Bruce Hansen

New brain mapping technique reveals neural code of images over time

18/10/2021

Humans are stepping ever closer to understanding how the brain codes visual information, as researchers have now developed a method that maps time-varying brain responses to images to reveal how the brain processes visual information.
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Image: Narasimhan Rajaram, University of Arkansas; Copyright:University of Arkansas

New technique shows early biochemical changes in tumors

15/10/2021

Researchers at the University of Arkansas have demonstrated the first use of a noninvasive optical technique to determine complex biochemical changes in cancers treated with immunotherapy.
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Image: Hand above of a Sensor; Copyright: Tokyo Medical and Dental University

Cervical Myelopathy Screening Focusing on Finger Motion Using Noncontact Sensor

15/10/2021

Cervical myelopathy (CM) results from compression of the spinal cord in the neck and causes difficulty moving the fingers and unsteady gait. As patients with early-stage CM have minimal subjective symptoms and are difficult for non-specialists to diagnose properly, the symptoms can be aggravated before patients are diagnosed with CM by a specialist.
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Image: Adult hand holds baby hand; Copyright: Charlie Ehlert, University of Utah Health

AI-based technology quickly identifies genetic causes of serious disease

14/10/2021

An artificial intelligence (AI)-based technology rapidly diagnoses rare disorders in critically ill children with high accuracy, according to a report by scientists from University of Utah Health and Fabric Genomics, collaborators on a study led by Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego.
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Image: Man wearing a face shield; Copyright: PantherMedia / sasirin pamai

Face shields deactivate SARS-CoV-2 and multi-resistant bacteria

14/10/2021

The Biomaterials and Bioengineering Laboratory from the San Alberto Magno Translational Research Centre (CITSAM) of the Catholic University of Valencia (UCV), whose principal researcher is Ángel Serrano, has developed a face shield that deactivates SARS-CoV-2 and bacteria-resistant antibiotics in under a minute. The development has been published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.
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Image: Diabetes detection from whole-body magnetic resonance imaging with deep learning; Copyright: DZD, JCI Insight

Diabetes detection with whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

13/10/2021

Type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with a whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. This is shown by a current study. They used deep learning methods* and data from more than 2000 MRIs to identify patients with (pre-) diabetes. The results have now been published in the journal JCI Insight.
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Image: The screws examined are tiny: their diameter is 2 millimeters; Copyright: Hereon/ Björn Wiese

Wanted: Corrosion

13/10/2021

Bone screws and plates that dissolve on their own after a broken bone has healed promise to be of great benefit. A research team has now used a 3D X-ray method to determine for the first time quantitatively how different of magnesium alloys dissolve over time under body-like conditions.
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Image: Ion track nanotechnology from GSI Materials Research creates a highly sensitive nanopore.; Copyright: GSI/FAIR

New sensor for SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses based on GSI nanotechnology

12/10/2021

Easy and fast detection of viruses are crucial in a pandemic. Based on single-nanopore membranes of GSI, an international interdisciplinary team of researchers developed a test method that detects SARS-CoV-2 in saliva, without sample pretreatment, with the same sensitivity as a qPCR test, and in only 2 hours. On top, the sensor can distinguish infectious from non-infectious corona viruses.
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Image: OPTIMA (Optimal Treatment for Patients with Solid Tumours in Europe Through Artificial intelligence); Copyright: OPTIMA

OPTIMA aims to improve treatment for prostate, breast and lung cancer through AI

12/10/2021

The Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) – a joint undertaking of the European Union and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) – announced the launch of OPTIMA, a € 21.3 million public-private research programme that will seek to use artificial intelligence (AI) to improve care for patients with prostate, breast and lung cancer.
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Image: The biofabrication exhibit at the Deutsches Museum Nürnberg; Copyright: Deutsches Museum Nürnberg

On our way to the production of artificial heart tissue

11/10/2021

At the newly opened Deutsches Museum Nuremberg, the University of Bayreuth offers insights into its expertise in the field of biofabrication involving unique materials, for example spider silk. The research combines natural growth processes and technical systems with the aim of specifically rebuilding damaged tissue in organs, skin, nerves, and tendons.
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Image: High spatial resolution MRI data; Copyright: CC BY-NC

Charting hidden territory of the human brain

11/10/2021

Neuroscientists discovered a novel, non-invasive imaging-based method to investigate the visual sensory thalamus, an important structure of the human brain and point of origin of visual difficulties in diseases such as dyslexia and glaucoma. The new method could provide an in-depth understanding of visual sensory processing in both health and disease in the near future.
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Image: Scheme of the new detection principle; Copyright: Rettke et al

Consumer protection: Novel method for detecting hormonally active substances

08/10/2021

Scientists from the Universities of Dresden and Leipzig have presented a new method for detecting hormonally active substances in food, cosmetics and water in the journal "Biosensors & Bioelectronics".
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Image: Dr. Gerti Beliu in his laboratory; Copyright: Judith Flurer / Rudolf-Virchow-Zentrum (PSC)

Sharper images through artificial amino acids

07/10/2021

Dr. Gerti Beliu has started a new research group at the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg in September. He uses novel techniques to exploit the resolution of microscopy more effectively and to develop new applications for biomedicine.
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Image: Sandrine Künzel from the Department of Ophthalmology at the University Hospital Bonn; Copyright: Katharina Wislsperger/UKB

AMD: Reading ability crucial indicator of functional loss

07/10/2021

In geographic atrophy, a late form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), reading ability is closely related to the altered retinal structure. This has been demonstrated by researchers from the Department of Ophthalmology at the University Hospital Bonn with colleagues at the National Eye Institute and the University of Utah.
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Image: UCLA-designed self-powered, stretchable, waterproof magnetoelastic generator for bioelectronics.; Copyright: Jun Chen/UCLA

UCLA bioengineers develop new class of human-powered bioelectronics

04/10/2021

A team of bioengineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering has invented a novel soft and flexible self-powered bioelectronic device. The technology converts human body motions — from bending an elbow to subtle movements such as a pulse on one’s wrist — into electricity that could be used to power wearable and implantable diagnostic sensors.
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Image: Data sheets and ampoules on a desk; Copyright: PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

Diligent helpers in data analysis: How AI becomes transparent and reproducible

01/10/2021

Huge amounts of data are generated in the laboratory every day, which have to be analyzed by hand. This is where artificial intelligence (AI) comes into play as a perfect helper: Because it evaluates such data volumes faster than humans ever could. The only problem with AI is: when it is developed, there is hardly any guideline or standard that makes AI systems comparable with each other.
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Image: a robot arm holding a small glass; Copyright: PantherMedia / Bork

The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization

01/10/2021

In the laboratory, there is some work that is time-consuming and monotonous – making it the perfect place for digital solutions such as artificial intelligence or robotics. But what work can these systems really take on in a meaningful way, in which areas of the lab are they present today, and where do they still need to be improved?
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Image: ; Copyright: CSL/University of Bremen

Speaking by imagining

30/09/2021

Computer scientists from the Cognitive Systems Lab at the University of Bremen have now succeeded in an international project to realize a so-called speech neuroprosthetic. With it, imagined speech can be made acoustically audible - without latency in real time.
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Image: MRI machine and screens with doctor and nurse; Copyright: PantherMedia/ImageSupply

Consistent clinical implementation of quantitative MRI

29/09/2021

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and Siemens Healthineers announced the collaborative development of a global education program focused on enabling the implementation of consistent, high-quality magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in radiationoncology. They are also collaborating to develop standardized MR protocols that will improve quantitative response assessment.
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Image: This 3D graphic shows the SINQ, which helps to produce radionuclides for medical purposes; Copyright: Paul Scherrer Institut/Mahir Dzambegovic

Novel and emerging medical radionuclides

29/09/2021

PRISMAP – The European medical radionuclides programme sets out to substantially change the European landscape for novel and emerging medical radionuclides.
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Image: The experimental setting. The robotic arm (in front) controlled by the test person (behind); Copyright: Baustädter/TU Graz

BCI Research: Computer Decodes Continuous Movement from Brain Signals

28/09/2021

For the first time ever, the intention of a continuous movement was able to be read out from non-invasive brain signals at TU Graz. This success enables more natural and non-invasive control of neuroprostheses to be carried out in real time.
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Image: Doctor performs gastroscopy on the patient; Copyright: PantherMedia/kot36

New imaging method for the detection of gastric lymphomas

28/09/2021

A new imaging technique for the detection of MALT lymphomas, malignant tumours of the lymphatic system, could probably save patients numerous gastroscopies. A study group of MedUni Wien achieved a high imaging accuracy by way of PET/MR and by using a PET Tracer directed against a certain cell receptor.
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Image: UVC LED irradiation system comprising 120 LEDs emitting at 233 nm wavelength - to inactivate pathogens or coronaviruses without damaging the skin; Copyright: FBH/P. Immerz

FBH presents new diode laser and UV LED developments at the Photonics Days

27/09/2021

From October 4 - 7, 2021, the Photonics Days Berlin Brandenburg will be held in hybrid format. The Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik (FBH) will participate with talks and in the two-day exhibition on October 6-7 in Berlin-Adlershof.
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Image: A scanning electron microscope image shows a cell-size robotoc swimmer that can be powered and steered by ultrasound waves; Copyright: Cornell University

Inspired by bacteria and sperm, scientists make micro-robot swimmers

24/09/2021

Scientists at Cornell University have created cell-size robots that can be powered and steered by ultrasound waves. Despite their tiny size, these micro-robotic swimmers – whose movements were inspired by bacteria and sperm – could one day be a formidable new tool for targeted drug delivery.
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Image: Woman in front of a laptop talking with doctor. On the laptop you can see her measured heart rate; Copyright: PantherMedia/VitalikRadko

New study to develop smart textiles powered by body movement for remote health monitoring

23/09/2021

For the next five years, Dr. Dharmasena will focus on creating sensor-containing super-smart textiles that can be used for remote health monitoring. The super-smart textiles will not only power electronic components, but also act as self-powered functional sensors that are able to accurately sense the movements of targeted body parts.
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Image: Schemativ of biological presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons and a synapse (inset); Copyright: Korea Institute Of Science and Technology

Development of dendritic-network-implementable artificial neurofiber transistors

23/09/2021

The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) has reported that a research team has developed organic neurofiber transistors with an architecture and functions similar to those of neurons in the human brain, which can be used as a neural network.
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Image: X-ray shows pleural effusion in right lung due to lung cancer; Copyright: PantherMedia/ stockdevil_666

Artificial intelligence could help diagnose lung cancer a year earlier

21/09/2021

An artificial intelligence (AI) program can spot signs of lung cancer on CT scans a year before they can be diagnosed with existing methods, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
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Image: Production of the new surgical masks that can deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Researchers release masks that instantaneously deactivate SARS-CoV-2

20/09/2021

Researchers released a new type IIR surgical mask with an intelligent fabric that can instantaneously deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19.
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Image: Stored in orange-capped vials for mass distribution, the drul buffer is part of an inexpensive salvia-based Covid test developed at Rockefeller; Copyright: Rockefeller University

Rockefeller saliva test for COVID-19 outperforms commercial swab tests

17/09/2021

Rockefeller’s Robert B. Darnell developed a in-house assay to identify positive cases within the Rockefeller community. Now, a new study in PLoS confirms that Darnell’s test performs as well, if not better, than FDA-authorized nasal and oral swab tests.
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Image: Assistant Professor Yan Zhenzhen, Assistant Professor Zhang Limao and Professor May O. Lwin; Copyright: Nanyang Technological University

'Optimal strategies' computer model could significantly reduce future COVID-19 infections and deaths

17/09/2021

A team of scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a predictive computer model that, when tested on real pandemic data, proposed strategies that would have reduced the rate of both COVID-19 infections and deaths by an average of 72 per cent, based on a sample from four countries.
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Image: Max Hahn, doctoral student at Umeå Center for Molecular Biology, studies a tissue sample with a light sheet fluorescence microscope; Copyright: Mattias Petterson

New method enables 3D microscopy of human organs

16/09/2021

Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, divide in their new method organs by the use of a 3D-printed matrix, creating portions of tissue with the optimal size for optical imaging using 3D technology. Specific cell types in human organs can be studied with micrometer precision to study for example other human organs and diseases.
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Image: Hands of a man, who is sitting in front of the laptop; Copyright: PantherMedia/peus

Tool to drive collaboration in cancer and Covid-19 research launched

16/09/2021

The new cancer and Covid-19 research dashboard is a public resource that lists research projects looking at the impact of Covid-19 on cancer care and patients.
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Image: Biotin-labeled secretory protein profiles in supernatants of hepatocyte cell lines, HepG2 and AML12, and mouse plasma; Copyright: KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science an Technology)

The Dynamic Tracking of Tissue-Specific Secretory Proteins

15/09/2021

Researchers have presented a method for profiling tissue-specific secretory proteins in live mice.
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Image: Heat-map, where red shows high levels of a compound, and blue shows low levels of a compounds, reveals the link between certain metabolites and dementia; Copyright: Okinawa Institute of Science

Signs of dementia are written in the blood, reveals new study

14/09/2021

Scientists in Japan have identified metabolic compounds within the blood that are associated with dementia.
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Image: SFU School of mechatronic systems engineering’s associate Professor Woo Soo Kim Holds the 3D-Printed Portable Ventilator; Copyright: Simon Fraser University

Technology takes the art of origami into the fight against COVID-19

13/09/2021

3D-printed origami technology at the heart of low-cost, portable ventilators aimed at improving pandemic treatment and revolutionizing healthcare delivery.
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Image: a tiny plaster with some gel on it; Copyright: NTU Singapore

New therapy for chronic wounds

10/09/2021

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), the Skin Research Institute of Singapore (SRIS), and local biotech start-up Celligenics are working together to develop accessible and affordable therapies to accelerate healing in chronic wounds such as diabetic ulcers and bed sores.
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Image: Staphylococcus aureus mrsa bacteria shown in a yellow color ; Copyright: PantherMedia/iLexx

Computer model may offer way to limit the spread of MRSA in hospitals

09/09/2021

A team developed a computer model that uses de-identified electronic healthcare records and laboratory test results to simulate MRSA transmission and predict inpatients' risk of infection. The model simulates the spread of MRSA through direct contacts, environmental contamination, and community importation.
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Image: TTSH’s Dr Leonard Yip (left) and NTU Singapore’s Assoc Prof Wang Lipo show their new method to screen glaucoma; Copyright: NTU Singapore

Singapore scientists develop AI-powered system to diagnose glaucoma using eye images

08/09/2021

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), in collaboration with clinicians at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH) in Singapore have developed a novel method that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to screen for glaucoma, a group of eye diseases that can cause vision loss and blindness through damage to the optic nerve at the back of the eye.
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Image: Making a white face mask with blue elastic band ; Copyright: PantherMedia/ahfoto.mail.ru

Nanofiber face masks improve filtration efficiency, need replacing more often

08/09/2021

Researchers from Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen show that nanofibers are superb at capturing droplets in aerosol and bonded together after the aerosol is captured. The bonding is tight and irreversible, even after the captured droplets evaporate.
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Image: Luis Bujanda sits in his office wearing a Face mask; Copyright: University oft he Basque Country

Blood test obviates unnecessary surgery in colon cancer patients

07/09/2021

A study by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country develops a simple, non-invasive tool designed to predict the existence of residual tumour cells.
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Image: Video recording from mother and child. Algorithm on the right side which analyses the children’s movements on video; Copyright: Kojovic, Natraj, Mohanty, Maillart, Schaer

Using video for the early detection of autism

07/09/2021

The team at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm based on the automated analysis of videos, making it possible to study children’s non-verbal communication in an anonymous and standardised manner.
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Image: A small drop of blood from the fingertip behind the diagram of the newly developed system which shows the antibodies in different colors; Copyright: RIKEN

Rapid and sensitive on-site measurement of antibodies against the COVID-19 virus

06/09/2021

A research team at the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS) in Japan has developed a diagnostic system that can rapidly and sensitively measure the amount of antibodies in the blood that can protect us from SARS-CoV-2.
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Image: Human skin cells cultures (gray and cyan) are reprogrammed by the uptake of synthetic exosomes (purple); Copyright: Max Planck Institute for Medical Research

Programming synthetic exosomes to optimize wound healing

06/09/2021

Scientists from the MPI for Medical Research and colleagues have engineered synthetic exosomes that regulate cellular signaling during wound closure. The synthetic structures resemble naturally occurring extracellular vesicles (EV) that play a fundamental role in communication between cells.
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Image: Transparent cells with cleavage nucleus cell membrane and visible chromosomes; Copyright: PantherMedia/ Burgstedt

Machine learning tool detects the risk of genetic syndromes in children

03/09/2021

With an average accuracy of 88%, a deep learning technology offers rapid genetic screening that could accelerate the diagnosis of genetic syndromes, recommending further investigation or referral to a specialist in seconds.
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Image: Portable genomics device; Copyright: Philippine Genome Center Mindanao

SARS-CoV-2: portable sequencing platform for developing countries

02/09/2021

Philippine Genome Center Mindanao (PGC Mindanao) has partnered with Accessible Genomics, a group of volunteering scientists from all around the world to implement a low start-up cost genomic sequencing platform for laboratories in developing countries.
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Image: Senior woman holding the hand of a doctor; Copyright: PantherMedia/Lighthunter

Rehab device enables stroke patients with arm disabilities to do more physical training

02/09/2021

The GribAble device, created by researchers at Imperial College London and clinicians at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, consists of a lightweight electronic handgrip that interacts wirelessly with a standard PC tablet to enable the user to play arm-training games.
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Image: Drawing inspiration from nature, a team of international scientists have invented a smart device for personalized skin care modeled after the male diving beetle; Copyright: McGill University

A skin crawling treatment for acne

01/09/2021

Drawing inspiration from nature, a team of international scientists have invented a smart device for personalized skin care modeled after the male diving beetle. This tool collects and monitors body fluids while sticking to the skin’s surface, paving the way for more accurate diagnostics and treatment for skin diseases and conditions like acne.
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Image: Image of the Corona Virus in front of a red background; Copyright: PantherMedia/lightsource

Computer scientists create new search systems to limit COVID-19 misinformation

01/09/2021

Researchers have created a new system that increases the correctness and reliability of health-related searches by 80 per cent to help people make better decisions about topics like COVID.
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Image: a woman with dark hair doing sit ups, wearing a fitnesstracker; Copyright: Robert Bosch GmbH

Avoid injuries, improve training – with self-learning sensors

01/09/2021

Artificial intelligence, sensors, wearables: they all collect and process data from their wearers. They are particularly popular in sports, because users no longer have to rely on their intuition, but can optimise their training based on sober, exact data. However, wearables are often criticized for being not only practical gadgets but also data krakens.
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Image: Scientist with pipette in laboratory ; Copyright: PantherMedia/alexraths

Genetic test better than blood test for cardiovascular diseases

31/08/2021

Determining an individual’s blood group based on genetic tests instead of merely traditional blood tests can provide a better picture of the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
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Image: Closeup view with selective focus of shiny glittering  water balls hydrogel; Copyright: PantherMedia/PhotoChowk

Improving strength, stretchiness and adhesion in hydrogels for wound healing

31/08/2021

Scientists use the adhesive capabilities of mussels as a model for optimizing hydrogels’ mechanical properties.
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Image: Emergency cardiology. ecg with supraventricular arrhythmias and brief atrial fibrillation ; Copyright: PantherMedia/Olga355

Screening for atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke

30/08/2021

Screening for atrial fibrillation in 75- and 76-year-olds could reduce the risk of stroke, severe bleeding and death, according to a study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that has been published.
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Image: Closeup view of an ecg ekg display; Copyright: PantherMedia/lucadp

Continuous heart rhythm monitoring and treatment if indicated does not prevent stroke

30/08/2021

Continuous heart rhythm monitoring – with anticoagulation if atrial fibrillation is detected – does not prevent strokes in those at risk.
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Image: CT scans (top panels) and three-dimensional imaging (bottom panels) of asthmatics with (left panels) and without (right panels) fixed airflow obstruction; Copyright: Hokkaido University

CT scans suggest possible lung destruction in some asthmatics

26/08/2021

A novel CT scan-based approach has revealed significant changes in a parameter indicating lung destruction in some asthmatics. This finding could lead to more personalized treatments for asthma accompanied by persistent airflow limitation.
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Image: Illustration shows the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness in childhood which has an effect on the Arterial Elasticity; Copyright: University of Finnland

Effect of metabolic syndrome traits on atherosclerosis can be reduced

25/08/2021

The deleterious effects of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors on arterial health can be reduced by increasing cardiorespiratory fitness already in childhood, a new study suggests.
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Image: The yellow building of the University of Bonn in the sunlight; Copyright: PantherMedia/ Vac (YAYMicro)

A global band for research

25/08/2021

Many innovative projects are tackled by the University of Bonn together with renowned partner universities around the world. One of this projects is the Research into psychiatric disorders.
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Image: NUS researcher Mr Douglas Tay in a hospital room at the NCID demonstrating how the Gesundheit II exhalation collection equipment is used; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Fine aerosols emitted during talking and singing may play a crucial role in COVID-19 transmission

24/08/2021

A new study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS), and conducted at the National Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCID), revealed that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) particles can be aerosolised by an infected person during talking and singing.
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Image: Hyperspectral imaging system and Saliva samples on a table; Copyright: University of Seville

Remote detection of viruses on surfaces

24/08/2021

Researchers from the University of Seville have developed and patented a prototype to detect remotely viruses (including synthetic SARS-CoV-2) deposited on surfaces, analyzing images taken at multiple wavelengths – the so-called hyperspectral imaging – a technique commonly used in astrophysics.
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Image: Woman wearing a FFP2 facemask in a Flower store, Copyright: Gettyimages

Optimal usage time for face coverings

23/08/2021

Researchers from Surrey's renowned Global Centre for Clean Air Research (GCARE) explore two key questions: how long a mask should be worn; and when should it be discarded, recycled or washed to optimise its usage time.
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Image: Senior grabs her heart in pain; Copyright: PantherMedia/ Kzenon (YAYMicro)

New study provides insight into tailoring exercise therapy to each heart failure patient

23/08/2021

Researchers from the Osaka City University (OCU) Graduate School of Medicine have shown that patients who underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test and showed an increased in oxidative stress had a poor prognosis.
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Image: players of SV Werder Bremen during the training; Copyright: Peter Balthazaar / Werder Bremen

Coordinating the training of professional soccer players through data analysis

17/08/2021

It's about finding the balance between stress and regeneration: How can data analysis be used to improve the training of professional soccer players, increase their performance, and minimize their susceptibility to injury? This was the question addressed in a cooperative project between the Data Engineering Master's Program at Jacobs University and the SV Werder Bremen Soccer Club.
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Image: Scan of an eye; Copyright: PantherMedia/ tlorna

Robotic scanner automates diagnostic imaging in the eye

13/08/2021

Engineers and ophthalmologists at Duke University have developed a robotic imaging tool that can automatically detect and scan a patient’s eyes for markers of different eye diseases.
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Image: Eight simulations of melanoma cell image traces converted with AI software to show, from left to right, a state of highly metastatic potential to low metastatic pote; Copyright: Andrew Jamieson

AI algorithm developed to assess metastatic potential in skin cancers

13/08/2021

Using artificial intelligence (AI), researchers from UT Southwestern have developed a way to accurately predict which skin cancers are highly metastatic. The findings published as the July cover article of Cell Systems, show the potential for AI-based tools to revolutionize pathology for cancer and a variety of other diseases.
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Image: Near-infrared spectroscopy is used to detect brain changes on a woman; Copyright: Frank Curran

New scanning technology could help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease using light

12/08/2021

Veterans Affairs researchers with the VA Bedford and VA Boston health care systems in Massachusetts have developed a non-invasive optical technique to help detect Alzheimer’s disease. The new technique uses spectroscopy—measuring how light is scattered and absorbed when passing through matter—to identify structural changes in the brain.
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Image: Kianoush Falahkheirkhah, a graduate student on the left and the director of the cancer center Rohit Bhargava on the right; Copyright: Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Software to enhance infrared imaging-based cancer diagnosis

12/08/2021

Bioengineers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign developed a sophisticated software to enhance IR-based cancer diagnosis.
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Image: Wearable technology sensors used in measurements; Copyright: Saara Rissanen

Wearable technology can help in at-home assessment of myoclonic jerks

11/08/2021

A new study by the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows that wearable sensor technology can be used to reliably assess the occurrence of myoclonic jerks in patients with epilepsy also in the home environment.
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Image: Flinders University researcher Jasmine Petersen with Associate Professor Ivanka Prichard in the SHAPE Research Centre pointing on the App; Copyright: Flinders University

Fitness apps keep us moving

11/08/2021

Self-managed exercise programs have advantages, say Flinders University researchers, who conducted a study to 'weigh up' the psychological and mental health barriers which promote or prevent people from engaging with physical activity apps during the initial COVID-19 lockdown in April-May last year – and perhaps regularly in the future.
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Image: Tumour boundary in blue, tumor tissue above on the left, Collagen in green, cell nuclei in red; Copyright: ETH Zurich

Illuminating tissue formation

10/08/2021

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body. It makes up a third of protein content and single strands assemble to form stable fibres that give structure to connective tissue such as skin, tendons, cartilage and bones. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a multi-component molecule that interacts with collagen and can be used to illuminate new tissue growth in the body.
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Image: Two hands, one hand is holding the other one because of a tremor; Copyright: PantherMedia/ Astrid08

New wearable mechanism lessens hand tremors

10/08/2021

UBC Okanagan researcher creates device that lessens hand tremors. New wearable mechanism may lessen the burden of those living with Parkinson’s.
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Image: Participant trains in the Ekso GT during an inpatient gait training session; Copyright: Kessler Foundation

High-dose gait training with robotic exoskeleton after acute stroke

09/08/2021

Preliminary findings by Kessler researchers show that the use of a robotic exoskeleton during inpatient rehabilitation for acute stroke may improve function. Gait training in the robotic exoskeleton can provide high-dose therapy soon after stroke, when it is likely to have its maximal effect on functional ambulation.
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Image: computer model of the tubular structures in the human heart; Copyright: SwRI

Computer model of inner heart structures

09/08/2021

The Southwest Research Institute and The University of Texas at San Antonio are collaborating to create a computer model of the intricate structures of the human heart as part of a larger effort to develop a new, potentially life-saving heart surgery.
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Image: Colorful in-vivo-imaging cornea; Copyright: International Centre for Translational eye Research (ICTER)

ICTER scientists re-engineer the study of the cornea

06/08/2021

A group of scientists in Warsaw found a way to better control the path of light to and from the fundus of the eye to distinguish, differentiate and examine the individual layers of the cornea on computer screens.
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Image: Sample vial; Copyright: Takuya Isono

Enabling safe delivery of RNA drugs to the lungs

05/08/2021

Hokkaido University researchers in Japan created and tested a library of lipid-based compounds to find a way to safely and effectively deliver RNA drugs to the lungs.
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Image: Nanofiber electrospinning machine; Copyright: PantherMedia/ manuelpugafotografia

"Greening" biomaterials and scaffolds used in regenerative medicine

05/08/2021

Columbia Engineers develop new “green electrospinning” process that could transform biofabrication, enabling production of nano-biomaterials that is scalable with minimal environmental impact.
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Image: The NTU flexible UV light sensors are responding to blue light; Copyright: Nanyang Technological University

Ultraviolet sensors for use in wearables

04/08/2021

To enable the development of wearable devices that possess advanced ultraviolet (UV) detection functions, scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have created a new type of light sensor that is both flexible and highly sensitive.
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Image: Woman taking measurements on the laser ophthalmoscope; Copyright: Volker Lannert/ Uni Bonn

Seeing better by looking away

04/08/2021

In a recent study conducted at the University of Bonn (Germany) the researchers observed offsets in both eyes of 20 healthy subjects, and speculate that the underlying fixation behavior improves overall vision.
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Image: a woman doing a breath test; Copyright: PantherMedia / imagepointfr

Breath test to determine correct treatment for epilepsy

03/08/2021

Epilepsy affects some 50 million people worldwide and pharmaceutical treatment of the disease is a tightrope walk, as the dose must be tailored precisely to the individual patient: "Slightly too little and it isn't effective. Slightly too much and it becomes toxic," explains Professor Pablo Sinues.
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Image: pink hackminte film with the image of an ant; Copyright: Sami Vuori

New Method of X-Ray Imaging

03/08/2021

Researchers from the University of Turku have discovered a new method of X-ray imaging based on the colouring abilities of the natural mineral hackmanite. The international group of researchers also found out how and why hackmanite changes colour upon exposure to X-rays.
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Image: a bacteria under the microscope; Copyright: 2021 EPFL

Organoid bladders reveal secrets of UTIs

02/08/2021

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections. They usually require treatment with antibiotics, and almost a quarter of treated cases lead to recurrent infection. The vast majority of UTIs are caused by a subspecies of the bacterium Escherichia coli, which infect cells that line the bladder wall and form what are known as "intracellular bacterial communities".
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Image: a hand in a glove holding a patch that looks like a piece of paper; Copyright: Fraunhofer IMWS

Innovative wound care – customized wound dressings made from tropoelastin

02/08/2021

Customized, biomedically applicable materials based on tropoelastin are being developed in a joint project by Skinomics GmbH and the Fraunhofer IMWS. The material combines biocompatibility, durability, biodegradability and favorable mechanical properties similar to those of skin.
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Image: a man and a roboter in the theatre; Copyright: PantherMedia/ekkasit919

Exploring possible applications of robotic surgery

09/03/2021

Robotics has been gaining importance in many areas of life for years, not least in medicine. Robots are already being used in the operating room today, but they do not always play the leading role – a circumstance that will certainly change in the long term.
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Image: disinfection of a door handle around which coronaviruses are flying; Copyright: PantherMedia/AntonMatyukha

Necessity is the mother of invention – innovations in the corona pandemic

01/03/2021

Keeping your distance, washing your hands, wearing a mask – such protective measures have been the order of the day since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic began. But appropriate products or procedures are not suitable for everyone, are often unavailable or, despite everything, carry a residual risk. The need for new, better solutions is high. But necessity is the mother of invention.
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Image: Finger of a woman touches sketch of a luminous light bulb; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andreus

Hygiene and disinfection: innovations against Covid-19

01/03/2021

When urgently needed products such as masks become scarce or conventional disinfection processes reach their limits, inventiveness is called for. And there is usually plenty of it in times of crisis. What innovations has the current corona pandemic already produced? How can they supplement or even replace existing products and processes?
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Image: young man in profile looking at his smartphone laughing; Copyright: PantherMedia/yacobchuk1

mHealth for asthma: Help me manage it myself!

11/01/2021

According to the WHO, around 600 million people worldwide suffer from chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma. Key in the fight against these diseases is therapy adherence, but many sufferers often find this difficult. The result is increased hospitalization, which ultimately comes at the expense of the healthcare system. Smart and mobile technologies could change that.
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Image: Asthma monitoring device is taped to the chest; Copyright: Respia

Breathe a sigh of relief with Respia

01/01/2021

There are many different kinds of mobile devices to help people with chronic diseases. Asthma is one of those diseases, which can be monitored with wearables to improve everyday life. Especially for parents, the stress and anxiety which come with asthma-afflicted children can be reduced with a reliable solution like Respia.
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Image: cell matrix; Copyright: TU Wien

Multi-photon lithography: printing cells with micrometer accuracy

01/12/2020

How do cells react to certain drugs? And how exactly is new tissue created? This can be analyzed by using bioprinting to embed cells in fine frameworks. However, current methods are often imprecise or too slow to process cells before they are damaged. At the TU Vienna, a high-resolution bioprinting process has now been developed using a new bio-ink.
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Image: 3D printer with a human heart inside, next to a box with

Bioprinting: life from the printer

01/12/2020

It aims at the production of test systems for drug research and gives patients on the waiting lists for donor organs hope: bioprinting. Thereby biologically functional tissues are printed. But how does that actually work? What are the different bioprinting methods? And can entire organs be printed with it? These and other questions are examined in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: three vials, one with hydrogels, one with bio ink and one with unmodified gelatine; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGB

"Cells are highly sensitive" – material development for bioprinting

01/12/2020

The big hope of bioprinting is to someday be able to print whole human organs. So far, the process has been limited to testing platforms such as organs-on-a-chip. That's because the actual printing process already poses challenges. Scientists need suitable printing materials that ensure the cell's survival as it undergoes the procedure. The Fraunhofer IGB is researching and analyzing this aspect.
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Image: Illustrations of various 3D-printed prostheses, implants and organs; Copyright: PantherMedia/annyart

Printed life – possibilities and limits of bioprinting

01/12/2020

Implants, prostheses and various other components made of plastic, metal or ceramics are already being produced by additive manufacturing. But skin, blood vessels or entire organs from the printer – is that possible? For years now, intensive research has been underway into the production of biologically functional tissue using printing processes. Some things are already possible with bioprinting.
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Image: Physician checks function of an arm prosthesis; Copyright: PantherMedia/belahoche

Bionic prosthesis: easy to put on, intuitive to use

22/09/2020

Patients who receive a prosthesis after the amputation of a limb often have to train for weeks or months until they can control the technology and use it in everyday life without problems. At the Medical University of Vienna, the world's first bionic prosthesis has now been developed that has a closed control loop and enables immediate, intuitive use.
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Image: Application of AR sonography; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGD

Augmented reality ultrasound: putting the focus on patients

10/08/2020

This is how a conventional ultrasound scan works: patients lie down on a table next to the ultrasound machine. A doctor uses a probe to scan the part of the body in question, while he or she looks at the pictures on a monitor. In other words, the physician either focuses on his/her hand on the patient or the monitor. The Fraunhofer IGD wants to change this process as part of the "sonAR" project.
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Image: Nurse checking surveillance monitor at the bedside and writing down patient data on a clipboard; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

Big Data: early warning system for the ICU

03/08/2020

Patient monitoring systems in the ICU sound up to 700 alarms on average per patient per day, which boils down to one alarm every two minutes. An excessive number of them are false alarms. This generates vast amounts of data, which can make it difficult for doctors and nurses to identify the most critical alarms to manage. It also has a negative effect on the treatment of intensive care patients.
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Image: Person with VR glasses in a room; Copyright: EXXETA AG

Gamification: facilitating a gradual return-to-play

08/06/2020

Professional athletes depend on a speedy recovery from sports injuries or surgery because their livelihood depends on their physical fitness. Returning to competition too soon after injury can have negative health consequences. Standard tests are now combined with virtual reality to determine the optimal time to return to play.
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Image: Ambulance on the road; Copyright: PantherMedia / inhabitant

Mobile stroke units: improved outcomes for ischemic stroke

02/06/2020

If someone is having a stroke, you call an ambulance. But getting to the hospital can be time-consuming. To prevent long-term disabilities and death, patients need to be treated as quickly as possible. According to a recent study by the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, mobile stroke units play a key role in this setting.
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02/06/2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: UV Visual Lift; Copyright: by UVentions

Hygiene: Smart protection against pathogens like the coronavirus

23/03/2020

Germs such as bacteria, viruses or pathogenic fungi can spread from one person to another through direct contact when we shake hands or touch objects. People touch door handles and push elevator buttons in public places and constantly move in and out of spaces. Regular manual high-level disinfection is practically impossible. UVentions GmbH has found an intelligent solution for this problem.
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Image: Endoscope capsule (left) next to an endoscope tube (right); Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

A new type of endoscopy – small, easy, comfortable

22/01/2020

Patients have to undergo a gastroscopy to rule out gastrointestinal conditions. Many dread this procedure since a thin, flexible tube is being pushed through the esophagus and stomach. Ovesco Endoscopy AG has teamed up with other project partners in the nuEndo research project to develop a capsule endoscopy device that is tiny, easy to swallow and makes the test more comfortable for the patient.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprostheses: between possibility and reality

01/01/2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprostheses. Endoprostheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprostheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: patient with pain in fingers; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Milkos

APRICOT-project: implant "help(s) patients heal themselves"

01/01/2020

Today, people tend to live longer, while an increasing number of patients suffer from osteoarthritis. Even younger generations are now at a higher risk of getting osteoarthritis due to the frequent use of mobile devices. The EU research project APRICOT aims to develop a novel type of implant for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hands – helping patients heal themselves.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprostheses: regaining independence and mobility

01/01/2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01/01/2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: elderly woman with a tablet on her lap; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Ambient Assisted Living: sensors for seniors

02/12/2019

Our ageing society is confronted with fewer and fewer workers. One of the many consequences is a shortage of skilled nursing staff. Ambient Assisted Living should solve this problem. By equipping the living environment of elderly people or people in need of care with (technical) assistance systems, they are to be given more self-determination and security. The nursing staff also benefits.
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Image: several people standing around a bed with a stand-up function on which one person sits; Copyright: Ralf Lienert/Allgäuer Zeitung

AAL Living Lab: research, education and raising awareness

02/12/2019

Smart home systems are a perfect example of how technology can make our daily lives easier. The fact that they can use a tablet to adjust lighting and blinds in every room benefits older adults in more ways than one. These types of technical systems are a part of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) and create a safe living environment for older persons.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02/12/2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Image: elderly woman in a wheelchair showing a nurse something on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Smart care: safety and support thanks to AAL

02/12/2019

Average life expectancy keeps increasing, while birth rates are declining – at least when it comes to most industrial nations. The coming decades will see a decreasing number of gainfully employed people versus more and more senior citizens and people in need of care. It's a trend that already pushes healthcare to the brink. That's why we desperately need new concepts. One of them is AAL.
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Image: Blood sample labelled

Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08/11/2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04.11.2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Connection of medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019: Experience tomorrow's innovations today

01/10/2019

The medical market is booming - medical ideas and visions for the future are more in demand than ever. Especially at MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019 young founders want to present their product innovations. Develop business contacts, meet investors and experience an international environment in just one place. Discover in our Topic of the Month what makes MEDICA START-UP PARK unique.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01/10/2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01/10/2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23/09/2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02/09/2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22/08/2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01/08/2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08/07/2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01/07/2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01/07/2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01/07/2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24/06/2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03/06/2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03/06/2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03/06/2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08/05/2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Dosage inhaler and stethoscope in front of a shelf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/liudmilachernetska@gmail.com

React early, breathe free – comprehensive COPD management

01/03/2019

COPD is considered the third most common cause of death worldwide and mainly affects smokers. It is not curable, but with the right combination of early diagnosis, therapy and self-management, a significant part of the quality of life can be regained. The comprehensive care is supported by various devices and technical tools. Learn more about the all-round care of COPD in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Preemie doll with drug delivery system on the nose; Copyright: Fraunhofer ITEM/Till Holland

Gentle medication for the little ones – with every breath

22/02/2019

According to the WHO, ten percent of babies worldwide are born prematurely. Since most organs of these tiny babies have not fully developed yet, it can quickly lead to complications and disorders and most notably affect the lungs of the premature infants. What's more, infections require gentle treatment, as the preemies themselves are fragile and susceptible – making this a challenging situation.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01/02/2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Woman at her desk holding her back; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrey Popov

AI ensures dynamic sitting

22/01/2019

Whether in the office, at school or behind the wheel: we spend a lot of time sitting and often stay in the same position for too long. The possible side effects are stiffness, back problems and pain. The SensA-Chair smart seating solution combats decreased mobility and ensures dynamic sitting.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – "TelePark"- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08/01/2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02/01/2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19/12/2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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Image: Hand prostheses is squeezing a small ball; Copyright: Alina Kettenbach

SoftHand: grasping intelligence for lower arm prostheses

10/12/2018

So far, lower arm prostheses often only functioned as a cosmetic disguise to conceal the missing body part. While newer models help the wearer with grip patterns, every hand grip has to be readjusted and newly activated. There is still no prosthetic device that is easy to control and allows a flexible response to objects the wearer is grasping.
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Image: Woman with electrodes on her head; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Electrical Effectiveness - healing methods alongside conventional Medicine

03/12/2018

Conventional medicine is taught at universities and is generally acknowledged. But other therapies have also proven their worth, such as electrical healing methods, which contribute to recovery and a better quality of life. In our Topic of the Month you learn about in which cases they are used, what their benefits are and what the current status of these methods is on the medical market.
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Image: A young boy who is wearing a medical device on his head; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ahfoto.mail.ru

Brain stimulation: treatment using electric current and magnetic fields

03/12/2018

The treatment for many neurological and mental disorders is far from being an easy feat. Drug therapies always require accurate medication adjustments, while brain surgeries have the potential for risks and complications. Non-invasive brain stimulation takes a different approach: magnetic fields and electric current change the activities in the brain - without putting the patient at risk.
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Image: Woman with electrodes in her neck; Copyright: panthermedia.net / microgen

Back to health – when electrical pulses provide healing

03/12/2018

Strengthening and healing thanks to the power of electrical pulses - is that really possible? When mobility is restricted or muscles are no longer as strong as they used to be, electrical treatment options can lead to improvement or even cure of diseases. But why are more and more people turning to these alternatives, what are the advantages and what are their limitations and drawbacks?
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Image: Proband with a neuroprosthesis; Copyright: MoreGrasp

MoreGrasp – being able to grasp again with paraplegia

22/11/2018

Every year between 250.000 and 500.000 people suffer a spinal cord injury, MoreGrasp is intended to make their lives easier. The project aims to restore the lost gripping function in people with high paraplegia. Researchers at Graz University of Technology have developed a neuroprosthesis that is currently undergoing a feasibility study.
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Image: the model of a kidney with gripping tools and the adhesive; Copyright: Purenum GmbH

A clean kidney: Break then glue

08/11/2018

Not enough exercise, an unhealthy diet: Kidney stones develop when urine contains too many insoluble compounds and are now one of the most common diseases worldwide. The ailment annually affects 1.2 million people in Germany alone. The stones are broken up and taken out via endoscopic surgery. Now it’s possible to remove even the tiniest residual fragments. The solution: a biocompatible adhesive.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22/10/2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: Silhouette of a head with a hole in the middle shaped like a puzzle piece. The puzzle piece is lying next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

WAKE-UP study a wake-up call for acute stroke care

08/08/2018

Some solutions are simple, though not necessarily obvious. The WAKE-UP study, which included 70 participating European stroke centers, has now studied a relatively simple procedure to manage the acute care of stroke patients and avoid potential long-term effects. Best of all, it is available wherever MRI is offered.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23/07/2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09/07/2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: man holding his stomach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ByLove

The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22/05/2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Ventricular fibrillation – Using ultrasound to detect its causes

17/05/2018

Ventricular fibrillation is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the heart muscle exhibits a rapid, erratic beat. The cause might be a circulatory system disease or heart attack. Researchers in Göttingen are now developing an ultrasound technique to get to the bottom of ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrhythmias and facilitate better treatment options.
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Image: two men in the laboratory next to the Organ Care System with a pig's lung inside; Copyright: Kaiser/MHH

Organ Care System: treatment under extreme conditions

08/05/2018

Multidrug-resistant organisms that are treated with a dosage that exceeds the regular dose a hundred times and at temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius – the human organism is unable to handle it. Yet if the diseased organ is treated outside of the body, extreme conditions are an option. For the first time, physicians have succeeded in treating a severe case of pneumonia by using the OCS.
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Image: Woman is standing on a 3D scanner that measures her feet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/roman023

Biomechanical measuring systems: Versatile tools for many disciplines

02/05/2018

When human movements are no longer as smooth as they should be – due to misalignments or as the result of an injury for example – biomechanical measuring systems spring into action. Thanks to different types of sensors and optical technologies, physicians, therapists, and sports scientists embark on a search for possible causes and corrective options.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09/04/2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
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Image: young woman with VR-glasses in the VR-Lab, in front of it a young man at a computer, on which a virtual heart can be seen; Copyright: Kompetenzzentrum eLearning in der Medizin Baden-Württemberg

VR Lab for medical students: linking theory and practice

22/03/2018

Virtual reality and medicine are increasingly mentioned in the same context. In addition to the development of applications that support the treatment of patients suffering from chronic pain and anxiety, this technology also benefits medical staff. Two months ago, the Ulm University Hospital has opened the VR Lab, where medical students can train and learn with the help of 3D organs.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: Photograph of hands with hyperspectral imaging; Copyright: Diaspective Vision GmbH

Precision surgery thanks to informative hyperspectral imaging

08/02/2018

When body tissue is reconnected during a tumor operation in the gastrointestinal tract, surgeons need information about the current state of these so-called anastomoses. The new, non-invasive hyperspectral imaging technology now makes it possible to measure the crucial parameters during surgery and thereby increase surgical precision.
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Image: Young female student is sitting between shelves on the floor of a library and reads; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brock Jones

Patient science: patients research cystic fibrosis

22/01/2018

Research does not always occur in laboratory settings. As part of citizen science, citizens collect data and make it available for research projects. Now, this approach is also adopted in medicine by way of patient science: in a new project, patients take part in cystic fibrosis research. The goal is to improve the lives of those who are affected by this chronic disease.
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Image: OR with very modern equipment; Copyright; Swen Reichhold

OR of the future: Surgical navigation systems and integrated devices

04/01/2018

While it is commonplace for operating room staff to work together as a team, the collaboration of operating room systems does not always work so well – many devices are still separated from one another, causing the OR processes to be prone to mistakes. The same applies to surgical navigation technologies that represent the interface between imaging, the surgeon and therapeutic devices.
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