AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Chest CT data interpreted by AI; Copyright: American Roentgen Ray Society

American Roentgen Ray Society

AI saves one hour of daily chest CT interpretation time in study

17/06/2022

Cardiothoracic radiologists exhibited a 22.1% reduction in chest CT interpretations times when having access to results from an automated AI support platform during real-world clinical practice.
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Image: A detailed virtual model of lung damage ; Copyright: KAUST; Ivan Gromicho

KAUST; Ivan Gromicho

AI helps diagnose post-COVID lung problems

27/05/2022

A new computer-aided diagnostic tool developed by KAUST scientists could help overcome some of the challenges of monitoring lung health following viral infection.
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Image: A man undergoes an MRI scan accompanied by a doctor; Copyright: engagestock

engagestock

Review of 3D visualization techniques of medical images

26/05/2022

A research team provides a review of three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques for medical images, intending to bridge the gap between medical experts and visualization researchers. With medical professionals as target readers, the review was published in Health Data Science, a Science Partner Journal.
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Image: Two men position a patient dummy between measuring devices on the floor; Copyright: Fraunhofer/Piotr Banczerowski

Fraunhofer/Piotr Banczerowski

3D-based position control in radiotherapy

24/05/2022

A research team at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF has worked closely with Varian Medical Systems (Fraunhofer IOF’s industrial partner) to develop a novel system for tumor radiotherapy, which improves cancer patients’ chances of recovery. The scientists behind the project were awarded the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize for the overall system.
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Image: CT scan of the abdomen with two red markers; Copyright: PantherMedia/stockdevil_666

PantherMedia/stockdevil_666

Computed tomography: Digital signals with photon-counting CT

01/02/2022

Does medicine get digital when we scan in diagnostic findings and digitize them in the process? It obviously is more efficient to record data directly in digital form, but not all diagnostic tools have this option. Computed tomography has now made enormous progress in this area: Unlike conventional CT technology, the new photon-counting CT directly creates digital image data.
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Image: A hand is touching a three-dimensional rendering of a human skull with blood vessel; Copyright: Brainlab

Surgical planning with immersive mixed reality

01/04/2021

The job of surgeons starts long before they step into the operating room. They must use two-dimensional MRI or CT scans to plan the surgical steps on a three-dimensional patient, relying on their experience, skill, and spatial sense. Using mixed reality (MR) to view human anatomical models allows for better visualization and navigation.
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Image: A physician in scrubs is putting on a Virtual Reality headset; Copyright: PantherMedia/Gorodenkoff

Broader perspective: how Mixed and Virtual Reality transform surgery

01/04/2021

For surgeons, nothing is more important than intimate knowledge and a spatial understanding of their operating field. Yet even three-dimensional imaging methods only provide limited assistance because the data is viewed on two-dimensional screens. When it comes to surgical planning or medical education, Mixed and Virtual Reality foster a better spatial understanding of the human body.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01/10/2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02/09/2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08/04/2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01/04/2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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