South America – Medical technology in Brazil and Colombia -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: colorful visualization of how the team's multitask convolutional neural network classifies primary cancer sites; Copyright: Hong-Jun Yoon/ORNL

AI tool to extract cancer data in record time

19.02.2020

Cancer is a public health crisis that afflicts nearly one in two people during their lifetime. Cancer is also an oppressively complex disease. Hundreds of cancer types affecting more than 70 organs have been recorded in the nation's cancer registries - databases of information about individual cancer cases that provide vital statistics to doctors, researchers, and policymakers.
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Image: machine doing an examination; Copyright: Monash University

New technology to help diagnose and manage respiratory diseases

13.02.2020

Monash University researchers in Australia have developed radical non-invasive technology that can be used to diagnose respiratory lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and lung cancer, and potentially fast-track treatments for patients.
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Image: mouse and cells depiction; Copyright: Science China Press

Minimal-invasive hydrogen therapy for cancer treatment

10.02.2020

Up to now, cancer is still one of the major diseases that threaten the survival of mankind, and it is difficult to cure clinically. In addition to single or combined surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which are commonly used clinically, a number of promising therapeutic strategies have been recently put forward.
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Image: Colored image of a tissue sample; Copyright: Brian Pogue, PhD

First images of oxygen in tumors during radiation therapy

06.02.2020

Using specialty cameras and an oxygen probe drug injection, researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center can now image oxygen from within cancer tumors during radiation while the probe is excited by Cherenkov light, a byproduct of radiation.
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Image: Three young men sitting at a couch together; Copyright: Klaus Pichler/CeMM

Diagnostics: single-cell sequencing of leukemia therapy

05.02.2020

Researchers at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and partners in Hungary have studied the response to targeted leukemia therapy in unprecedented detail, using single-cell sequencing and epigenetic analysis.
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Image: A man in an MRI with his head fixed, next to him two physicians who discuss the images; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ancikainfot

Advanced imaging and genomic analysis could help treat brain cancer

04.02.2020

Melding the genetic and cellular analysis of tumors with how they appear in medical images could give physicians and other cancer therapy specialists new insights into how to best treat patients, especially those with brain cancer, according to a new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope.
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Image: Women are standing in a circle, holding a piece of paper that says

4 February is World Cancer Day – what can we do?

04.02.2020

The motto of World Cancer Day has been "I am and I will" since 2019 already. The three-year campaign that ends in 2021 prompts us to start thinking: Who am I and what will I do to fight cancer? This also comprises what we can do to support cancer patients and to spread the knowledge about cancer and how to prevent it.
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Image: Organoids grown in the laboratory on some kind of bottles; Copyright: AlessioCoser for University of Trento

Organoids to study pediatric brain tumors

30.01.2020

Researchers are at work to find effective treatments to help young patients with brain tumors. Hundreds of brain organoids have been developed in the laboratories of the University of Trento to understand the genetic mechanisms responsible for these hard to treat diseases.
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Image: woman shows a man colorful radiation images projected on the wall; Copyright: UTSW

AI can jump-start radiation therapy for cancer patients

28.01.2020

AI can help cancer patients start their radiation therapy sooner by instantly translating complex clinical data into an optimal plan of attack. Patients typically must wait several days to a week to begin therapy while doctors manually develop treatment plans. But new research shows how enhanced deep-learning models streamlined this process down to a fraction of a second.
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Image: body scan with focus on cells in the breast; Copyright: panthermedia.net/cliparea

Imaging: magnetized molecules used to monitor breast cancer

21.01.2020

A new type of scan that involves magnetising molecules allows doctors to see in real-time which regions of a breast tumour are active, according to research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Image: Nikolas Herold a researcher at Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset; Copyright: Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset

Inexpensive drug may alleviate treatment-resistance in leukemia

20.01.2020

A common and inexpensive drug may be used to counteract treatment resistance in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), one of the most common forms of blood cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in mice and human blood cells performed at Karolinska Institutet and SciLifeLab and published in the medical journal EMBO Molecular Medicine.
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Image: Female physician shows a man an image of his brain with a tumor marked; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Imaging: peeking into the genome of brain tumors

17.01.2020

Researchers at Osaka University have developed a computer method that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and machine learning to rapidly forecast genetic mutations in glioma tumors, which occur in the brain or spine. The work may help glioma patients to receive more suitable treatment faster, giving better outcomes. The research was recently published in Scientific Reports.
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Image: Female physician shows a man an image of the prostate; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Prostate cancer can now be diagnosed better using AI

16.01.2020

Researchers at Radboud university medical center have developed a 'deep learning' system that is better than most pathologists at determining the aggressiveness of prostate cancer. The AI system, which uses tissue samples to arrive at its diagnosis, taught itself to identify prostate cancer based on data from over 1200 patients.
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Image: A vial with a blood sample, inside a graphic showing a DNA helix; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kiyoshi Takahase Segundo

21-gene recurrence score may help in radiation decision-making

15.01.2020

A new study shows that a test physicians commonly used to guide chemotherapy treatment for post-breast cancer surgery patients may also help them decide whether radiation therapy may be of benefit.
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Image: Drawing of an intersection of the brain stem with a tumor; Copyright: Alicia Ortega, MS

Brain cancer: Surgery may add to survival for adults with gliomas

14.01.2020

For adult patients with brainstem high-grade gliomas - one of the rarest and deadliest forms of brain cancer - surgically removing the entire tumor may add many months or potentially years of survival beyond that offered by radiation and chemotherapy, according to results of a medical records study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
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Image: A radiation treatment room with a linear accelerator; Copyright: panthermedia.net/amoklv

Cancer: entire course of radiation treatment in less than a second

14.01.2020

Cancer patients may one day be able to get their entire course of radiation therapy in less than a second rather than coming in for treatment over the course of several weeks, and researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania have taken the first steps toward making it a reality.
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Image: binary code on black ground; COLOURBOX.de

Artificial Intelligence tracks down leukemia

09.01.2020

Artificial intelligence can detect one of the most common forms of blood cancer – acute myeloid leukemia (AML) – with high reliability. Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Bonn have now shown this in a proof-of-concept study. Their approach is based on the analysis of the gene activity of cells found in the blood.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Smart algorithm finds possible treatment for childhood cancer

09.01.2020

Using a computer algorithm, scientists at Uppsala University have identified a promising new treatment for neuroblastoma. This form of cancer in children, which occurs in specialised nerve cells in the sympathetic nervous system, may be life-threatening.
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Image: graphic showing that cancer cells will be destroyed while healthy cells are spared with targeted pulsed ultrasound; Copyright: David Mittelstein

Ultrasound selectively damages cancer cells when tuned to correct frequencies

08.01.2020

Doctors have used focused ultrasound to destroy tumors without invasive surgery for some time. However, the therapeutic ultrasound used in clinics today indiscriminately damages cancer and healthy cells alike.
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Image: AI computer; Copyright: RIKEN

AI identifies features associated with cancer recurrence

19.12.2019

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology developed by the RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project (AIP) in Japan has successfully found features in pathology images from human cancer patients, without annotation, that could be understood by human doctors. Further, the AI identified features relevant to cancer prognosis that were not previously noted by pathologists.
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Image: laboratory technology; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Robert Przybysz

Analyser system: Epigenomic technology combats disease

11.12.2019

Much remains unknown about diseases and the way our bodies respond to them, in part because the human genome is the complete DNA assembly that makes each person unique. A Virginia Tech professor and his team of researchers have created new technology to help in understanding how the human body battles diseases.
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 Image: illustration of the ConvPath software workflow; Copyright: UTSW

Software tool: AI helps doctors identify cancer cells

11.12.2019

UT Southwestern researchers have developed a software tool that uses artificial intelligence to recognize cancer cells from digital pathology images - giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes.
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Image: sci-Plex technique; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia (YAYMicro)

Drug information system: shows how cancer cells react to drugs

10.12.2019

A new technique overcomes several limitations of typical high-throughput chemical screens conducted on cell samples. Such screens are commonly used to try to discover new cancer drugs, and in many other biomedical applications.
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Image: PR-OCT imaging; Copyright: Zhu Lab

Machine learning: imaging boosts colon cancer diagnosis

09.12.2019

Colorectal cancer is the second most common type of cancer worldwide, with about 90% of cases occurring in people 50 or older. Arising from the inner surface, or muscosal layer, of the colon, cancerous cells can penetrate through the deeper layers of the colon and spread to other organs. Left untreated, the disease is fatal.
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Image: A physician is holding a plastic cup for urine samples; Copyright: panthermedia.net/terovesalainen

Diagnostics: New home urine test for prostate cancer

02.12.2019

A simple urine test under development for prostate cancer detection can now use urine samples collected at home - according to new research from University of East Anglia and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.
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Image: examples of histopathology in the datasets used in the analyses; Copyright: Lisanne L. de Boer, Esther Kho et al.

Imaging: ability to characterize healthy and non-healthy tissue

29.11.2019

In an article published in the peer-reviewed SPIE publication Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), "Influence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue in breast surgery specimens," research observed across 92 ex vivo breast specimens suggests that there is little to no impact on the optical signatures of breast tissue after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08.08.2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02.11.2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: diagnosis of the lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sergey Nivens

With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung

01.10.2018

Thanks to various imaging supplies, it is possible to make the inside of the body accessible for diagnostics, research and treatment. The lung, one of the most important human organs for survival, is also examined in this way. In our Topic of the Month, we looked at how doctors are getting a closer look at the lung, how the procedures differ, and which ones will be available in the near future.
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09.07.2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Personalized cancer medicine – Best possible treatment with TherapySelect

30.04.2018

Medicine is getting more and more personalized. This is particularly interesting for oncology, since a cancer is as individual as the respective patient. When choosing a therapy, both the characteristics of the tumor and the personal characteristics of the patient must be considered. To see exactly what this looks like, we visited the diagnostics company TherapySelect, based in Heidelberg.
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Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09.04.2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
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Image: Man with stethoscope and medical symbols; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Between austerity measures and growth pressure - Latin America's medical market

03.04.2018

A region whose states make up the world's third largest economy and which has few linguistic differences - Latin America is an attractive market for foreign companies at first glance. This also applies to the medical market. However, various factors are contributing to the fact that this market is growing only slowly in most countries.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01.03.2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01.03.2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01.03.2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22.02.2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: Preview picture of video

MEDICA 2017: Cutting-edge, look into the future

13.11.2017

For exhibitors and visitors, MEDICA 2017 does not start until Monday. However, the trade press already gets a preview of some selected product highlights on the Sunday before the trade fair. We were there with the camera and met with some exhibitors. They gave us the opportunity to present cutting-edge products and to take a look at the medical technology of the future.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22.08.2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: A large medical device with a treatment couch and four movable boxes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Thomas Hecker

Cancer: refined treatment with proton minibeams

10.07.2017

Radiation therapies are an essential component of today’s oncology because they enable the treatment of localized tumors. Yet they have one major drawback: radiation damages not just tumor cells but also healthy tissue. One solution to solve this problem could be proton minibeam therapy, which uses finely focused beams.
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Photochemical internalization – A new hope against bile duct cancer?

03.07.2017

Advanced bile duct tumors cannot always be removed surgically. Then, patients receive chemotherapy and a stent that corrects the narrowing of the bile duct that is caused by the tumor. Another, local therapy option is tested at the University Hospital Frankfurt: laser light is used to transport drugs into the tumor during photochemical internalization.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24.04.2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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