Of streams and flows – the importance of hospital logistics -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Images: Researchers work with microscopes; Copyright: panthermedia.net / LightField Studios

Microscope: Technology revolutionizes drug development

22.05.2019

The search for new drugs to combat diseases more effectively could be revolutionised through a new £30 million electron microscopy project. Experts would be able to see, for the first time, how a particular drug works within a patient at a cellular level or the molecular processes set in motion by a genetic mutation.
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Image: Researcher with a microfluidic chip; Copyright: panthermedia.net / hquality

Microfluidic chip: New technology to capture tumor cells

20.05.2019

Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.
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Image: close-up of liquid metal drop, used to make the mini-centrifuge; Copyright: RMIT University

Organ-on-a-chip: mini-centrifuge for simpler study of blood cells

10.05.2019

A simple innovation the size of a grain of sand means we can now analyse cells and tiny particles as if they were inside the human body. The new micro-device for fluid analysis will enable more tailored experiments in drug development and disease research via new 'organ-on-chip' systems.
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Image: sample of the 'Gut-On-A-Chip' Technology hold by a biomedical engineer; Copyright: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin

Gut-on-a-chip: personalized treatment for Crohn's disease

06.05.2019

To model human health and disease, organ-on-a-chip technology mimics the human body's organ structure, functionality and physiology in a controlled environment. These miniature systems, which serve as accurate models of various organs from the heart and lungs to the gut and the kidneys, can use a patient's own cells to test drugs and understand disease processes.
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Image: elderly laboratory worker holds a chip and looks at it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/matej kastelic

Microfluidic chip to better detect Ebola virus

06.05.2019

A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus. With this type of device, those infected can be treated earlier, and the early detection process can potentially decrease the spread of infections.
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Image: Key of security; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Kheng Ho Toh

Cybersecurity: New chip stops attacks before they start

03.05.2019

A new computer processor architecture developed at the University of Michigan could usher in a future where computers proactively defend against threats, rendering the current electronic security model of bugs and patches obsolete.
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Image: AI analyzes diabetic ratinopathy; Copyright: panthermedia.net / peshkova

mHealth: Smartphone AI detects diabetic retinopathy

01.05.2019

Researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center revealed that combining a smartphone-mounted device that takes high-quality retinal pictures with artificial intelligence software that reads them, can determine in real- time whether a patient should be referred to an ophthalmologist for follow-up.
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Image: Men at the sea plays the mobile game Sea Hero Quest; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia Itd

mobile Health: Game detects Alzheimer's risk

29.04.2019

A specially designed mobile phone game can detect people at risk of Alzheimer's - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers studied gaming data from an app called Sea Hero Quest, which has been downloaded and played by more than 4.3 million people worldwide.
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Image: computational model for cancer treatment; Copyright: Kimberly Sabsay

Computational model for cancer treatment

05.04.2019

Researchers have developed a computational model for human MEK1, a protein with potential as a drug target for a variety of human cancers.
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Image: Construction of an organelle in a living cell for protein biosynthesis; Copyright: Gemma Estrada Girona

Laboratory technology: designer organelles in cells

01.04.2019

A research team led by biophysical chemist Professor Edward Lemke has engineered a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell in a new complex biological translation process. The created membraneless organelle can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carrying new functionalities.
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Image: Picture of a new optical visualization of nano objects; Copyright: Kazan Federal University

Laboratory technology: New way of optical visualization?

01.04.2019

High-resolution optical microscopy methods promise breakthroughs in materials science, biology, and medicine. Today, their possibilities basically reach those of scanning electron microscopy.
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Image: Two physicians in front of a computer; Copyright: Tohoku University

Imaging: A peek into lymph nodes

18.03.2019

A new method to diagnose cancer cells inside lymph nodes could allow doctors to treat cancers before they spread around the body
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – “TelePark“- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08.01.2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: OR nurse is standing in front of a screen and holds surgical pincers in her hand; Copyright: ASANUS Medizintechnik GmbH

Eye on material flow: network solutions for hospital logistics

01.02.2018

Hospitals need an accurate assessment of the location and quantity of their materials to eliminate sources of error. Automated processes can also help employees to make these materials available at the right time and at the right place. Digital network systems will substantially support the logistics in the hospital of the future.
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Image: Black-and-white picture, with some structures of the human body highlighted in color; Copyright: ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern

Cochlear implants: safe procedure thanks to surgical robots

22.05.2017

For many years, cochlear implants have restored a sense of hearing in people with certain types of hearing loss. For surgeons, the implantation requires a precise attention to detail under the microscope. The results for the patients improve significantly with a more precise placement of the electrode array. The use of a surgical robot can increase the accuracy of the procedure.
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Image: Surgeon is working at a simulator of the human back with two instruments; Copyright: HTWK Leipzig/Rebecca Schweier

RealSpine: realistic surgical simulation

22.02.2017

Surgeons need a great sense of touch. They first have to acquire this skill in simulation training before they can perform surgery on actual patients. Having said that, simulators are not just meant to teach the right movements; ideally, they should also provide a true-to-life experience of the surgical field – as is the case in RealSpine surgical training.
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