Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future? -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Researcher examines cell culture plates under the microscope; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

Analyzing disease progression and cell processes with TIGER: in vivo and non-invasively

18/01/2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) and the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) in Würzburg have developed a technology they call TIGER. It allows complex processes in individual cells to be deciphered in vivo by recording past RNA transcripts.
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Image: Two men and two women are standing in a laboratory and examining a small apparatus (microphysiological system); Copyright: Amac Garbe/Fraunhofer IWS

Amac Garbe/Fraunhofer IWS

Radioactive substances fight cancer in the mini-lab

13/01/2023

Two Dresden research institutes want to reduce the number of animal experiments in radiopharmaceutical research with a new idea.
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Image: Small moldecules - illustration in orange; Copyright: Aalto University

Aalto University

Gaining unprecedented view of small molecules by machine learning

06/01/2023

A new tool to identify small molecules offers benefits for diagnostics, drug discovery and fundamental research. A new machine learning model will help scientists identify small molecules, with applications in medicine, drug discovery and environmental chemistry.
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Image: A doctor examines a brain scan in the laboratory; Copyright: XiXinXing

XiXinXing

Map of the brain's- and cerebrospinal fluid's immune cells

21/12/2022

Neuroscientists from the University of Münster have now generated an atlas that could change this: using it will allow to better understand disease mechanisms and to study the effects of therapies in a new way. This invaluable resource is provided as a freely available software for researchers all around the world.
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Image: Scientists pipette a DNA sample into a multi-well plate ready for genetic testing in a laboratory; Copyright: westend61

westend61

Ground-breaking new method for multi-cancer early detection

16/12/2022

An international study led by researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows that a new, previously untested method can easily find multiple types of newly formed cancers at the same time – including cancer types that are difficult to detect with comparable methods.
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Image: Prof. Lachmann uses different scalable systems to continuously produce specific mature human immune cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.; Copyright: Fraunhofer ITEM

Fraunhofer ITEM

Designer immune cells for drug discovery, potency and safety testing

14/12/2022

Fraunhofer researchers have succeeded in scaling the production of customized immune cells from laboratory up to industrial level.
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Image: Microscopic images of lab-grown mini-retinas; Copyright: Völkner et al., Nat. Comm., 2022

Völkner et al., Nat. Comm., 2022

Macular degeneration: new potential mechanism for vision loss discovered

09/12/2022

Thanks to laboratory produced human mini-retinas, researchers were able to observe complex changes in the retina as they occur in macular degeneration. This enabled them to discover the so-called cell extrusion as a potential mechanism for neurodegenerative diseases.
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Image: A woman in a white coat sits at a laboratory desk and works with a pipette while a man in a white coat stands and watches; Copyright: NUS Institute for Health Innovation & Technology

NUS Institute for Health Innovation & Technology

New cancer testing method makes regular monitoring affordable

09/12/2022

Scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have discovered a novel low-cost method of testing for cancers. Called the Heatrich-BS assay, this new test sequences clinical samples that have been heated in order to isolate cancer-specific signatures found in a patient’s blood.
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Image: Overweight man in casual wear measuring his waist circumference; Copyright: mstandret

mstandret

Why are overweight people more susceptible to illness?

07/12/2022

If you gain weight, the fat cells in the body get bigger. So in the extremely obese, those fat cells are greatly enlarged. Now, researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able to show how enlarged fat cells can cause metabolic diseases. They also developed non-invasive examination methods to determine the size of human fat cells.
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Image: 3D representation of lymph nodes and their blood vessels; Copyright: Paul Schütz

Paul Schütz

How lymph nodes are supplied with blood

07/12/2022

3D images have been obtained that show the vascular system of the nodes with previously unattained resolution.
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Image: 3D illustration. Colorful DNA molecule. Conceptual image of a structure of the genetic code; Copyright: ktsimage

ktsimage

Sinonasal cancer: AI facilitates breakthrough in diagnostics

30/11/2022

Researchers at LMU and Charité hospital in Berlin have developed a method for classifying difficult-to-diagnose nasal cavity tumors.
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Image: Close-up: The complex architecture of the neuroepithelial organoids with cell membranes; Copyright: Keisuke Ishihara

Keisuke Ishihara

Measuring organ development

28/11/2022

Researchers from Dresden and Vienna reveal link between connectivity of three-dimensional structures in tissues and the emergence of their architecture to help scientists engineer self-organising tissues that mimic human organs.
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Image: A woman in the lab, Tina Bürki from Empa's Particles-Biology Interactions lab in St. Gallen, inspects a set of biochips; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Empa's Zukunftsfonds – Funding ambitious research: A chip to replace animal testing

24/11/2022

New drugs made from nanoparticles that can easily penetrate any interface within our bodies are a great hope in medicine. For such hopefuls to reach the market, their safety must be ensured. In this context, it must also be clarified what happens if a substance manages to penetrate the natural barrier between baby and mother, the placenta, in the body of pregnant women.
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Image: A small square apparatus, an electrochemical sensing platform for studying in vitro vascular systems. The channels and reservoirs were visualized using blue ink.; Copyright: Tohoku University

Tohoku University

Sensing platform for studying in vitro vascular systems

11/11/2022

The costliness of drug development and the limitations of studying physiological processes in the lab are two separate scientific issues that may share the same solution.
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Image: Mobile laboratory unit with integrated lifting device for a standard truck chassis; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT/Markus Michel

Fraunhofer IBMT/Markus Michel

MEDICA 2022: Biological laboratory to go

10/11/2022

Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT have developed the “BioSensoLab“, a mobile biological laboratory with which they can demonstrate new developments to customers and test them together – on site at their companies.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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