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Image: Cells on a programmable composite of silica nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes; Copyright: Niemeyer-Lab, KIT

Programmable materials for stem cells

20.01.2020

Using DNA, smallest silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed novel programmable materials. These nanocomposites can be tailored to various applications and programmed to degrade quickly and gently.
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Image: structure of the system; Copyright: Sternberg and Fernández Labs at Columbia University Irving Medical Center

DNA: first images of an 'upgraded' CRISPR tool

20.12.2019

Columbia scientists have captured the first images of a new gene editing tool that could improve upon existing CRISPR-based tools. The team developed the tool, called INTEGRATE, after discovering a unique "jumping gene" in Vibrio cholerae bacteria that could insert large genetic payloads in the genome without introducing DNA breaks.
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Image: different neural tissue geometries; Copyright: panthermedia.net/amucuzia

Tissue Engeneering: new in-vitro 3D neural tissue model

12.12.2019

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have successfully used stem cells to engineer living biohybrid nerve tissue to develop 3D models of neural networks with the hopes of gaining a better understanding of how the brain and these networks work.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12.12.2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: endoscopic examination in the hospital; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

Endoscopy: new less invasive ultra-miniaturized endoscope

10.12.2019

Johns Hopkins engineers have created a new lens-free ultra-miniaturized endoscope, the size of a few human hairs in width, that is less bulky and can produce higher quality images.
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Image: sci-Plex technique; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia (YAYMicro)

Drug information system: shows how cancer cells react to drugs

10.12.2019

A new technique overcomes several limitations of typical high-throughput chemical screens conducted on cell samples. Such screens are commonly used to try to discover new cancer drugs, and in many other biomedical applications.
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Bild: Dr. Somashekar Krishna performs an endomicroscopy at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center; Copyright: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

"Virtual biopsy": to accurately diagnose pancreatic cysts

09.12.2019

Research from doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds a new "virtual biopsy" allows them to definitively diagnose cysts in the pancreas with unprecedented accuracy. This means they can eliminate precancerous cysts and potentially save lives.
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Image: PR-OCT imaging; Copyright: Zhu Lab

Machine learning: imaging boosts colon cancer diagnosis

09.12.2019

Colorectal cancer is the second most common type of cancer worldwide, with about 90% of cases occurring in people 50 or older. Arising from the inner surface, or muscosal layer, of the colon, cancerous cells can penetrate through the deeper layers of the colon and spread to other organs. Left untreated, the disease is fatal.
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Image: classified cells in comparision; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München / Carsten Marr

Blood cells: AI-driven classification

13.11.2019

Every day, millions of single blood cells are evaluated for disease diagnostics in medical laboratories and clinics. Most of this repetitive task is still done manually by trained cytologists who inspect cells in stained blood smears and classify. This process suffers from classification variability and requires the presence and expertise of a trained cytologist.
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Image: biosensor platform consisting of graphene layers; Copyright: Letao Yang, KiBum Lee, Jin-Ho Lee and Sy-Tsong (Dean) Chueng

Biosensor: technology created for stem cells

12.11.2019

A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other neurological disorders.
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Image: molecular simulation close-up; Copyright: Chan Cao, EPFL

Biosensor: made from a dangerous toxin

30.10.2019

Some types of bacteria have the ability to punch holes into other cells and kill them. They do this by releasing specialized proteins called "pore-forming toxins" (PFTs) that latch onto the cell's membrane and form a tube-like channel that goes through it. This hole across the membrane is called a pore. Punctured by multiple PFTs, the target cell self-destructs.
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Image: 3D-printed cell in a laboratory; Copyright: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech

3D-printing: finds cancer cells

29.10.2019

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.
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Image: medial prefrontal cortex; Copyright: Drs. Christopher Parkhurst and David Artis (WCM)

Cells: gut health influences brain health

25.10.2019

Over the last two decades, scientists have observed a clear link between autoimmune disorders and a variety of psychiatric conditions. For example, people with autoimmune disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), psoriasis and multiple sclerosis may also have depleted gut microbiota and experience anxiety, depression and mood disorders.
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Image: data streams white on a blue background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/davidcastillodominici

Algorithm: machine learning's pigenetic drug discovery

24.10.2019

Sanford Burnham Prebys scientists create a machine-learning algorithm that automates high-throughput screens of epigenetic medicines. Machine learning's powerful ability to detect patterns in complex data is revolutionizing how we drive, how we diagnose disease and now, how we discover new drugs.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08.05.2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Radiology assistant presses a button at the front of a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Lung cancer: Screening with low-Dose CT scans

01.10.2018

Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest cancers. The symptoms tend to be non-specific, often causing its detection to be too late. Currently, there is no comprehensive screening. This could change with the use of low-dose CT scans. It should be noted that this is not just an issue of technical feasibility. A screening test must also make sense from a health policy perspective.
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Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09.04.2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
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