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Image:  CT scan shows a slight reticular pattern in the left lower lobe and subpleural area; Copyright: Zheng et al.

Deep learning makes it possible to detect COVID-19 lesions by analyzing CT chest scans

03/12/2021

A new automated system that involves deep learning technology enables the detection of COVID-19 lesion via the analysis of a computed tomography (CT) scan. This system, described in a study published in the journal Computers in Biology and Medicine, has been carried out by researchers of the UB, the EURECAT Technology Centre of Catalonia, and the Computing Vision Center (CVC).
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Image: Man looking at MRI scan; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Ischukigor

MRI and AI can detect early signs of tumor cell death after novel therapy

02/12/2021

A team led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has demonstrated ​​that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to detect early signs of tumor cell death in response to a novel virus-based cancer therapy.
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Image: red marked liver in the human body; Copyright: PantherMedia  / sciencepics

New PET imaging-based tool detects liver inflammation from fatty liver disease

01/12/2021

A UC Davis Health team has developed a first-of-its-kind positron emission tomography (PET) scan imaging-based tool to detect liver inflammation in patients affected with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Image: Lung image from National COVID-19 Chest Imaging Database ; Copyright: NCCID Collaborative

New NHS imaging resource assists AI in the COVID-19 fight

30/11/2021

Published in the Open-Access, Open-Data journal GigaScience is the National COVID-19 Chest Imaging Database (NCCID), a centralised database containing chest X-rays, Computed Tomography (CT) and MRI scans from patients across the UK.
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Image: Neuronal cell nuclei of the dentus gyratus and associated blood vessels; Copyright: M. Eckermann/T. Salditt

X-ray image throws light on neurodegenerative disease

29/11/2021

Researchers at the University of Göttingen and University Medical Center Göttingen have now found a new technique to measure and quantify neuronal tissue architecture in three dimensions and at high resolution, which enabled them to identify changes in neurons in Alzheimer's.
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Image: Enhanced images; Copyright: POSTECH

AI helps to correct distortions in in vivo photoacoustic images of humans

26/11/2021

Obtaining an accurate speed of sound (SoS) inside the body leads to improved resolution of ultrasound or photoacoustic (PA) images. However, it is difficult to accurately predict the SoS since it differs from person to person, depending on the random distribution of muscle, bone, and fat in each individual.
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Image: Dr. Jens Bankstahl and Professor Dr. Tobias Ross; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Better images for science

25/11/2021

In order to detect and research diseases, it is important to look inside the body. For this purpose, there are various imaging methods – from ultrasound examinations to X-rays and computer tomography. Molecular imaging provides a particularly precise insight, showing biological processes and organ functions "live".
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Image: Grad-CAM heatmaps for deep learning models; Copyright: American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Deep learning for extremity radiographs confounded by labels

19/11/2021

According to an open-access Editor's Choice article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), convolutional neural networks (CNN) trained to identify abnormalities on upper extremity radiographs are susceptible to a ubiquitous confounding image feature that could limit their clinical utility: radiograph labels.
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Image: Appendicitis CT scan; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Genrix20061.mail.ru

Doctors can use CT scans with less radiation to diagnose appendicitis

12/11/2021

A new paper in the British Journal of Surgery, published by Oxford University Press, indicates it's now possible to diagnose appendicitis using low-dose CT scans, decreasing the radiation exposure, which is of significant clinical importance especially in young patients.
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Image: Dr. Kolja Them and a MRI machine; Copyright: MOIN CC, Uni Kiel

Progress in the imaging of metabolic processes

11/11/2021

A research team in Kiel has developed new contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging in order to be able to make biochemical processes visible.
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Image: Doctor looking at CT scan; Copyright: PantherMedia / beerkoff1

Development of artificial intelligence technology for producing CT images based on MRI

10/11/2021

Transcranial focused ultrasound can be used to treat degenerative movement disorders, intractable pain, and mental disorders by delivering ultrasound energy to a specific area of the brain without opening the skull. This treatment must be performed with an image-based technology that can locate the brain lesions. Doctors typically use CT to obtain information about a patient's skull.
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Image: Ben Larimer and Anna Sorace; Copyright: UAB

Hypoxia imaging and combination therapy aid immunotherapy treatment of solid tumors

29/10/2021

Immunotherapy using checkpoint inhibitors can work well to treat cancer, but only a minority of patients respond to therapy. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have now shown — in preclinical experiments — how to identify non-responding tumors and improve their response to immunotherapy, as shown by limited tumor growth and extended survival.
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Image: A research team around Robin Maack und Kurt Schardt is working on the new software; Copyright: TUK

New technique to identify and predict stroke lesions

27/10/2021

Strokes are the cause of various disabilities, as they damage the brain such that some areas do not function properly any more. Those areas are called lesions. Directly identifying or predicting lesions in clinical daily routine is still not possible with today's imaging tools, creating the need for new software solutions.
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Image: Co-author PD Dr. med. Andreas Sauter evaluating X-ray images; Copyright: Andreas Heddergott / TUM

Darkfield X-ray technology improves diagnosis of pulmonary ailments

27/10/2021

For the first time, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have successfully used a new X-ray method for respiratory diagnostics with patients. Dark-field X-rays visualize early changes in the alveolar structure caused by the lung disease COPD and require only one fiftieth of the radiation dose typically applied in X-ray computed tomography.
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Image: Different types of images; Copyright: Nina Shvetsova et al./IEEE Access

Artificial intelligence spots anomalies in medical images

22/10/2021

Scientists from Skoltech, Philips Research, and Goethe University Frankfurt have trained a neural network to detect anomalies in medical images to assist physicians in sifting through countless scans in search of pathologies. Reported in ​​IEEE Access, the new method is adapted to the nature of medical imaging and is more successful in spotting abnormalities than general-purpose solutions.
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Image: Human Head and Brain with different waveforms in the background; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Andreus

Brain 'noise' may hold the keys to psychiatric treatment efficacy

20/10/2021

It remains a central challenge in psychiatry to reliably judge whether a patient will respond to treatment. In a new study researchers show that moment-to-moment fluctuations in brain activity can reliably predict whether patients with social anxiety disorder will be receptive to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).
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Image: DETI mapping results from the brain of a person viewing one of the stimuli used in the experiment; Copyright: Bruce Hansen

New brain mapping technique reveals neural code of images over time

18/10/2021

Humans are stepping ever closer to understanding how the brain codes visual information, as researchers have now developed a method that maps time-varying brain responses to images to reveal how the brain processes visual information.
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Image: Diabetes detection from whole-body magnetic resonance imaging with deep learning; Copyright: DZD, JCI Insight

Diabetes detection with whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

13/10/2021

Type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with a whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. This is shown by a current study. They used deep learning methods* and data from more than 2000 MRIs to identify patients with (pre-) diabetes. The results have now been published in the journal JCI Insight.
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Image: High spatial resolution MRI data; Copyright: CC BY-NC

Charting hidden territory of the human brain

11/10/2021

Neuroscientists discovered a novel, non-invasive imaging-based method to investigate the visual sensory thalamus, an important structure of the human brain and point of origin of visual difficulties in diseases such as dyslexia and glaucoma. The new method could provide an in-depth understanding of visual sensory processing in both health and disease in the near future.
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Image: PET imaging of tumours (dashed circles) in a mouse (right in cross-section) using a newly developed radioactive substrate. Tumour cells producing a SNAP-tag enzyme t ; Copyright: Depke D et al.

Cell labelling method from microscopy adapted for use in whole-body imaging for the first time

01/10/2021

Scientists utilised SNAP-tag technology to radioactively label cells in living organisms. They developed a SNAP-tag substrate equipped with a radioactive signal emitter and used it to make tumour cells in the bodies of mice visible in PET images. The labelling method opens up the prospect of studying cells with different imaging techniques and at different temporal stages.
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Image: MRI machine and screens with doctor and nurse; Copyright: PantherMedia/ImageSupply

Consistent clinical implementation of quantitative MRI

29/09/2021

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and Siemens Healthineers announced the collaborative development of a global education program focused on enabling the implementation of consistent, high-quality magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in radiationoncology. They are also collaborating to develop standardized MR protocols that will improve quantitative response assessment.
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Image: A physician in scrubs is putting on a Virtual Reality headset; Copyright: PantherMedia/Gorodenkoff

Broader perspective: how Mixed and Virtual Reality transform surgery

01/04/2021

For surgeons, nothing is more important than intimate knowledge and a spatial understanding of their operating field. Yet even three-dimensional imaging methods only provide limited assistance because the data is viewed on two-dimensional screens. When it comes to surgical planning or medical education, Mixed and Virtual Reality foster a better spatial understanding of the human body.
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Image: A hand is touching a three-dimensional rendering of a human skull with blood vessel; Copyright: Brainlab

Surgical planning with immersive mixed reality

01/04/2021

The job of surgeons starts long before they step into the operating room. They must use two-dimensional MRI or CT scans to plan the surgical steps on a three-dimensional patient, relying on their experience, skill, and spatial sense. Using mixed reality (MR) to view human anatomical models allows for better visualization and navigation.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23/04/2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01/04/2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

Hybrid Imaging – Two Views of the Lungs

25/01/2019

CT scan, MRI or X-ray: All these methods allow doctors to see inside the body - including inside the lungs - and make a diagnosis. The clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the RWTH Aachen University Hospital uses a state-of-the-art gamma camera that combines SPECT and CT.
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Image: preview picture of the video

Diagnosis in HD – Imaging at MEDICA 2018

14/11/2018

Whether CT, MRT, X-rays or ultrasound – imaging methods provide insights into the human body and are irreplaceable for diagnostics. They are part of everyday hospital life since a long time, but what is currently happening in this field? We took a look – at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: One presses on screen with security key; Copyright: panthermedia.net/welcomia

Digitization: Hospitals as Popular Targets?

02/11/2018

It’s safe to say that patients and their prompt medical care take center stage at any hospital. Digitization of the healthcare sector is quickly advancing to make this a reality: data is stored in a digital medium, devices are linked together. But how safe are hospitals in the age of innovation?
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Image:Lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/CLIPAREA

Lung Imaging – Keeping the Respiratory System Healthy

05/10/2018

Many people have damaged or suboptimally functioning lungs. An accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment are vital to protect this life-sustaining organ. Modern imaging solutions help physicians and patients understand what happens inside the lungs.
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Image: diagnosis of the lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sergey Nivens

With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung

01/10/2018

Thanks to various imaging supplies, it is possible to make the inside of the body accessible for diagnostics, research and treatment. The lung, one of the most important human organs for survival, is also examined in this way. In our Topic of the Month, we looked at how doctors are getting a closer look at the lung, how the procedures differ, and which ones will be available in the near future.
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Image: Silhouette of a head with a hole in the middle shaped like a puzzle piece. The puzzle piece is lying next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

WAKE-UP study a wake-up call for acute stroke care

08/08/2018

Some solutions are simple, though not necessarily obvious. The WAKE-UP study, which included 70 participating European stroke centers, has now studied a relatively simple procedure to manage the acute care of stroke patients and avoid potential long-term effects. Best of all, it is available wherever MRI is offered.
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Image: Doctor with a laptop, around him various medical images, behind him an ECG; Copyright: panthermedia.net/realinemedia

Surgical navigation systems: Safely guiding the scalpel

04/01/2018

Imaging, navigation, integration – these are terms that describe the modern operating room. All of these components play a key role in accurate surgical procedures. They are integrated into surgical navigation systems, which make complicated medical surgeries considerably safer.
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