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Image: father, mother and child prepare a salad in the kitchen; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ArturVerkhovetskiy

Protection through awareness and prevention - World Diabetes Day 2019

14.11.2019

Do you know who celebrates his birthday on November 14th? It’s the Canadian surgeon Frederick Banting. Why is that important? Because he was the first to isolate the hormone insulin and thereby lay the foundation for the treatment of diabetes. That's why World Diabetes Day today reminds us of Banting, in 2019 for the 28th time already!
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Image: classified cells in comparision; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München / Carsten Marr

Blood cells: AI-driven classification

13.11.2019

Every day, millions of single blood cells are evaluated for disease diagnostics in medical laboratories and clinics. Most of this repetitive task is still done manually by trained cytologists who inspect cells in stained blood smears and classify. This process suffers from classification variability and requires the presence and expertise of a trained cytologist.
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Image: cancer cell gets treated with sound; Copyright: Tohoku University

Cancer treatment: attacking with sound

30.10.2019

Drugs can be safely delivered to cancerous lymph nodes via the lymphatic system and then released inside the nodes using sound waves. Tohoku University researchers tested the treatment on mice with metastatic breast cancer and published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Image: 3D-printed cell in a laboratory; Copyright: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech

3D-printing: finds cancer cells

29.10.2019

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.
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Image: a protein adapter in the blood stream; Copyright: MPI-P

Cells: toxin, trauma, therapy?

28.10.2019

The department of Prof. Tanja Weil at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research has, in cooperation with the group of Prof. Holger Barth from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Ulm University, shown in initial laboratory tests that they are able to specifically modulate processes in human white blood cells in vitro.
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Image: triple-coaxial cell printing technology to construct biomimetic tissue-engineered blood vessels; Copyright: Gao et al.

Implant: 3D printing, bioinks create blood vessels

24.10.2019

A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks, which were formulated from smooth muscle cells from a human aorta and endothelial cells from an umbilical vein.
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Image: Traumatic Microbleeds in the Brain; Copyright: Image courtesy of Latour Lab/NINDS

Imaging: new information regarding traumatic microbleeds

14.10.2019

Using advanced imaging, researchers have uncovered new information regarding traumatic microbleeds, which appear as small, dark lesions on MRI scans after head injury but are typically too small to be detected on CT scans.
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Image: blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thelightwriter

Blood vessels: overly permeable

09.10.2019

In Germany alone there are around 400,000 patients who suffer from chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. For the first time, researchers have discovered that dysfunctions in blood vessels play a significant role in the development of such diseases. In experimental model systems, the progression of the disease slowed down significantly by eliminating these dysfunctions.
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Image: detail of the microneedle biosensor; Copyright: Imperial College London

Biosensor: detecting patient's antibiotic levels with microneedles

02.10.2019

Small, non-invasive patches worn on the skin can accurately detect the levels of medication in a patient's system, matching the accuracy of current clinical methods. In a small-scale clinical evaluation, researchers at Imperial College London have shown for the first time how microneedle biosensors can be used to monitor the changing concentration of antibiotics.
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Image: Blood in test tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/scanrail

Cells: mechanism for the formation of new blood vessels

24.09.2019

Researchers from Uppsala University have revealed for the first time a mechanism for how new blood vessels are formed and have shown the importance of this mechanism for embryo survival and organ function. The results could be developed to control the formation of new blood vessels in different diseases. The new study is published in the journal EMBO Reports.
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Image: vascular prosthesis for the aorta; Copyright: JOTEC GmbH

Prosthesis: new lease of life thanks to new aorta

20.09.2019

Patients with the rare Loeys-Dietz syndrome suffer from aortic enlargement which may result in sudden over-expansion and a fatal aortic tear. In order to prevent this from happening, an aortic prosthesis must be implanted.
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 Image: Research team of nonoparticle sensor; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Optical sensor: detects very low glucose concentrations

17.09.2019

The Optical Research Group of the Universitat Jaume I has developed an optical nanoparticle sensor capable of detecting very low glucose concentrations, such as those present in a person's tear, by means of fluorescent carbon quantum dots, applying synthesis of nanomaterials based on irradiation with ultra-short lasers, which is an alternative, sustainable and non-polluting method.
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Image: purple microscope image of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck; Copyright: Jurmeister/Charité

Machine Learning: improving the diagnosis of head and neck cancers

16.09.2019

Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the German Cancer Consortium have successfully solved a longstanding problem in the diagnosis of head and neck cancers. Working alongside colleagues from TU Berlin, the researchers used artificial intelligence to develop a new classification method which identifies the primary origins of cancerous tissue based on chemical DNA changes.
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Image: dna strings in yellow, blue and red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/khenghotoh

DNA: construction kit replaces expensive antibody medication

11.09.2019

Researchers at KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a technique to make sheep produce new antibodies simply by injecting the DNA building blocks. This approach is much cheaper and more efficient than producing antibodies industrially and administering them afterwards. The study in animals with a similar size as humans brings us a step closer to the clinical use of antibody gene therapy.
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Image: a stent coated with titanium oxynitride; Copyright: Fraunhofer IKTS

Stents: better protection against occluded blood vessels

06.09.2019

Cardiovascular stents are special implants used to widen blood vessels that have become constricted as a result of calcium deposits. In some cases, the body's immune system can reject these implants in a process known as foreign-body reaction. In a joint project with partners, Fraunhofer researchers have now developed enhanced coatings that substantially improve the biocompatibility of stents.
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 Image: reasearcher in laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Islet-on-a-chip: miniature device for diabetes research

30.08.2019

In a study led by Harvard University's Kevin Kit Parker, microfluidics and human, insulin-producing beta cells have been integrated in an "Islet-on-a-Chip". The new device makes it easier for scientists to screen insulin-producing cells before transplanting them into a patient, test insulin-stimulating compounds, and study the fundamental biology of diabetes.
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Image: blood samples; Copyright: Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing

Biomarker: health indication in old age

21.08.2019

Researchers on ageing from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) collaborate to link basic insights from model organisms to the causes of ageing in humans. They can determine the disease vulnerability of older people using a defined set of substances in the blood.
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Image: wearable placed on the forehead of a man; Copyright: Bizen Maskey, Sunchon National University

Wearables: sensors detect what's in your sweat

21.08.2019

New easy-to-make sensors can provide real-time measurements of sweat rate and electrolytes and metabolites in perspiration. Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat.
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Image: nanoparticles in a close-up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/raimund14

Precision medicine: graphene nanoflakes as a new tool

20.08.2019

Chemists funded by the SNSF have created a new compound for flexible drug delivery that specifically targets prostate cancer cells. Incorporating four different molecules, the compound prevents tumour cells from multiplying, can be detected by medical imaging and has staying power in the bloodstream.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01.07.2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22.03.2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21.11.2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02.11.2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22.06.2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: Woman holding a doll in a glowing pyjamas; Copyright: Empa

Illuminated pyjamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20.12.2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01.08.2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01.08.2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24.07.2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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