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Image: Looking at a neuropathological large slice preparation (from left): Prof. Dr. Albert Becker, Dr. Juri-Alexander Witt and Annika Reimers in the Institute; Copyright: Barbara Frommann/University

Barbara Frommann/University of Bonn

Unexpected cognitive deteriorations in epilepsy

29/11/2022

In severe epilepsies, surgical intervention is often the only remedy - usually with great success. While neuropsychological performance can recover in the long term after successful surgery, on rare occasions, unexpected declines in cognitive performance occur. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now been able to show which patients are at particularly high risk for this.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Epilepsy: Automatically detecting and documenting seizures with AI

28/11/2022

Up to now, the detection of epileptic seizures has been difficult and – especially in the case of minor seizures – inadequate. This is about to change with monikit. In the future, the sensor device and artificial intelligence will be used to collect comprehensive data and thus improve the care of those affected.
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Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11/06/2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01/04/2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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