News from the Editors -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

MEDICA Newsletter

Social Media

More about…

Image: A three-dimensional view of cell activities of skin cancer squamous cell carcinoma.; Copyright: M. Schober/E. Fuchs, Rockefeller University

M. Schober/E. Fuchs, Rockefeller University

New method melds data to make a 3-D map of cells’ activities

20/05/2022

HZI researchers develop molecular probes to detect pathogens in clinical samples.
Read more
Image: Electron micrograph of Staphylococcus aureus; Copyright: HZI/Manfred Rohde

HZI/Manfred Rohde

A bright spot for microbiological diagnostics

19/05/2022

HZI researchers develop molecular probes to detect pathogens in clinical samples.
Read more
Image: Assembly of biochips with attached tubes; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen

Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen

Process chains for isolation and analysis: from single cells to organoids

17/05/2022

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT are working on new tools for the preparation and analysis of single cells and cell assemblies. The team developed the "Liftoscope", a system for cell sorting for subsequent cultivation that can analyze and transfer biomaterials precisely and in a way that is gentle on cells.
Read more
Image: A man wearing VR glasses stands in front of a screen and looks at a protein structure; Copyright: The University of Texas at San Antonio

The University of Texas at San Antonio

Virtual reality to give UTSA students unique look at proteins

16/05/2022

Francis Yoshimoto, assistant professor in the UTSA College of Sciences’ Department of Chemistry, is introducing his Biochemistry II laboratory students to a new way of learning—using virtual reality headsets to observe and analyze protein structures.
Read more
Image: A woman running; Copyright: Mohammad Mohammad

Mohammad Mohammad

Regardless of distance: humans run at the most energy-efficient speed

09/05/2022

By combining data from runners monitored in a lab along with 37,000 runs recorded on wearable fitness trackers, scientists have found that humans’ natural tendency is to run at a speed that conserves caloric loss—something that racers seeking to shave time off their miles will have to overcome.
Read more
Image: Shaopeng Wang poses for the camera; Copyright: The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University

The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University

A sharper image for proteins

05/05/2022

To fully understand proteins and their myriad functions, researchers have developed sophisticated means to see and study them using advanced microscopy, enhanced light detection, imaging software and the integration of advanced hardware systems. A new study from Arizona State University describes a new technique that promises to revolutionize the imaging of proteins and other vital biomolecules.
Read more
Image: The new multi-organ chip is shown; Copyright: Kacey Ronaldson-Bouchard/Columbia Engineering

Kacey Ronaldson-Bouchard/Columbia Engineering

Plug-and-play organ-on-a-chip can be customized to the patient

05/05/2022

Major advance from Columbia Engineering team demonstrates first multi-organ chip made of engineered human tissues linked by vascular flow for improved modeling of systemic diseases like cancer
Read more
Image: MRI scan of patient's head, neck and brain; Copyright: Nikita_Karchevskyi

Nikita_Karchevskyi

Subgroups of glioblastoma associated with disease prognosis

02/05/2022

Researchers have detected different subgroups of the brain tumour form glioblastoma, where the cancer cells’ properties depend on which cell type they originate from. The used analysis method could also separate glioblastoma patients with significant differences in survival. The findings open up for identifying specific therapeutic targets for the new subgroups of glioblastoma.
Read more
Image: Researchers in a laboratory; Copyright: Freya Lücke, UKSH

Freya Lücke, UKSH

Leukaemia: Previously unknown risk factors in adulthood

29/04/2022

New research from the Clinical Research Unit "CATCH ALL" at Kiel University and UKSH identifies genetic causes for treatment resistance in BCP-ALL.
Read more
Image: A PCR diagnostic kit; Copyright: felipecaparros

felipecaparros

Technology transfer award for PCR rapid test device for infection diagnostics

25/04/2022

Spindiag GmbH, together with the University of Freiburg and the Hahn-Schickard-Gesellschaft für angewandte Forschung e.V., was awarded the Technology Transfer Prize 2020 from the German Physical Society (DPG) on April 09, 2022 for the development of the PCR-based rapid test system Rhonda.
Read more
Image: Microscope image: damage to lung tissue caused by the invasive fungal infection aspergillosis.; Copyright: Zoltán Cseresnyés/Leibniz-HKI

Zoltán Cseresnyés/Leibniz-HKI

How do fungal infections spread in the human lung?

22/04/2022

A chip model allows us to observe growth in the tissue.
Read more
Image: View over the shoulder of a female laboratory technician who is filling a sample into a vial; Copyright: friends_stock

friends_stock

World Laboratory Day 2022: Celebrate your lab!

22/04/2022

Drugs, vaccines, pathogen vulnerabilities, information about genetics and genetic material - the cornerstones of modern medicine are laid in research laboratories. And without efficient laboratory diagnostics, we would not be able to detect and treat a wide range of diseases. Two reasons to celebrate laboratories and the people who work there.
Read more
Image: Scientist fills microplates ; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Want to 3D print a kidney? Start by thinking small

21/04/2022

Stevens computational model aims to accelerate microfluidic bio-printing that opens up a pathway for 3D printing any kind of organ at any time.
Read more
Image: A smiling man with glasses, beard and blue jacket – Dr. Michael Kreutz; Copyright: Unimedizin Magdeburg

Unimedizin Magdeburg

HFSP funding to study synaptic lipid signatures

19/04/2022

The astonishing capacity of the brain to process and store information crucially relies on properly functioning synapses. They provide the connecting entities within neural circuits and their properties define circuit function.
Read more
Image: Example of the microcapilliary strips loaded with samples; Copyright: Sarah Needs, Cygnus smartphone testing technology

Sarah Needs, Cygnus smartphone testing technology

Dengue detection smartphone tech shows new hope for low-cost diagnostics

14/04/2022

Accurate home testing could be used for a wider range of illnesses, as new research shows the capability of smartphone-powered tests for Dengue Fever.
Read more
Image: demonstration of a gel that rapidly self-heals after injection to form a solid-like gel; Copyright: Abigail K. Grosskopf

Abigail K. Grosskopf

Simple delivery method enhances promising cancer treatment

13/04/2022

One cutting-edge cancer treatment exciting researchers today involves collecting and reprogramming a patient’s T cells – a special set of immune cells – then putting them back into the body ready to detect and destroy cancerous cells. Although effective for widespread blood cancers like leukemia, this method rarely succeeds at treating solid tumors.
Read more
Image: Device for single particle combinatorial lipidic nanocontainer fusion dots; Copyright: Nikos Hatzakis, University of Copenhagen

Nikos Hatzakis, University of Copenhagen

Revolutionary tool will meet future pandemics with accelerated response

07/04/2022

A new tool speeds up development of vaccines and other pharmaceutical products by more than one million times while minimizing costs.
Read more
Image: Empa researcher Fei Pan is working on a membrane made of nanofibers ; Copyright: Empa

Empa

In the heat of the wound

04/04/2022

A bandage that releases medication as soon as an infection starts in a wound could treat injuries more efficiently. Empa researchers are currently working on polymer fibers that soften as soon as the environment heats up due to an infection, thereby releasing antimicrobial drugs.
Read more
Image: MediSCAPE imaging of the living human tongue. Copyright: Kripa Patel-Hillman Lab/Columbia Engineering

Kripa Patel-Hillman Lab/Columbia Engineering

New technology could make biopsies a thing of the past

04/04/2022

MediSCAPE, a high-speed 3D microscope designed by Columbia Engineers, can see real-time cellular detail in living tissues to guide surgery, speed up tissue analyses, and improve treatments
Read more
Image: a clean room of SOMI medical, in the rear area is an employee sitting, in the front area is a filled storage rack; Copyright: SOMI medical GmbH

SOMI medical GmbH

Production hygiene: the packaging process from warehouse to logistics

01/04/2022

Applications of telemedicine surged in popularity in efforts to reduce the COVID-19 infection risk for both medical professionals and patients. Unfortunately, the services typically lack a proper diagnostic option.
Read more
Image: Man stands with his back to a projection of close-ups of the eye; Copyright: Source IPC PAS/ICTER, Karol Karnowski

Source IPC PAS/ICTER, Karol Karnowski

OCT studies without noise: new method for better detection of eye diseases

25/03/2022

Worldwide, as many as 285 million people suffer from serious eye diseases or blindness. Unfortunately, most of them do not have access to modern methods of treatment, so help often comes too late.
Read more
Image: closeup of a female eye ; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Craig Robinson

PantherMedia / Craig Robinson

BMBF funds junior research group for 3D bioprinting project

25/03/2022

For her research project on three-dimensional "printing" of the human cornea, Junior Professor Dr Daniela Duarte Campos of Heidelberg University has been awarded financial support of approximately 2.2 million euros through the "NanoMatFutur" funding competition sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research.
Read more
Image: Scientist examining cells under a microscope; Copyright: PantherMedia / Anamaria Mejia

PantherMedia / Anamaria Mejia

Brain organoids provide insight into malformations of cortical development

23/03/2022

A study at the Hector Institute for Translational Brain Research (HITBR) at the Central Institute of Mental Health (CIMH) in Mannheim shows that cerebral organoids open up new insights into the development of the human brain and associated disorders.
Read more
Image: Dongkyun Kang and a smartphone confocal microscope; Copyright: Mueller, S./Wintergerst

Kris Hanning / University of Arizona Health Sciences

UArizona engineer leads $1M project to fight vision loss

17/03/2022

Biomedical engineering and optical sciences professor DK Kang is developing a way to diagnose and treat corneal ulcers that's eight times cheaper and 20 times faster than today's gold standard.
Read more
Image: Georgia Tech researcher Gabe Kwong poses for the camera Copyright: Georgia Tech photo

Georgia Tech photo

Biosensors for quick assessment of cancer treatment

16/03/2022

Immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) inhibitors have transformed the treatment of cancer and have become the frontline therapy for a broad range of malignancies. It’s because they work better than the previous standard of care.
Read more
Image: Close-up of bacteria Copyright: PantherMedia / beawolf

PantherMedia / beawolf

Large bacterial populations develop stronger resistance to antibiotics

14/03/2022

In large bacterial populations, mutants that evolve relatively late resist antibiotic treatment more effectively, while smaller populations rely on less effective mutations that appear at an earlier point in time.
Read more
Image: Microtubes with biological samples Copyright: PantherMedia / Alex011973

PantherMedia / Alex011973

Advances in micro-computed tomography

14/03/2022

Researchers in biomedical physics and biology have significantly improved micro-computed tomography, more specifically imaging with phase contrast and high brilliance x-ray radiation.
Read more
Image: The blood supply to the brain is shown in a simplified way; Copyright: Marie Arsalidou et al./PLOS One

Marie Arsalidou et al./PLOS One

First-of-its-kind child ultrasonography dataset enables a wealth of research

11/03/2022

Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from HSE University and York University have presented an extensive dataset of indices derived from ultrasonography scans of three major arteries that supply blood to the brain.
Read more
Image: Brandon Jutras, left, and research scientist Mari Davis, right, in the lab ; Copyright: Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Grant to improve Lyme disease diagnostics and therapeutics

10/03/2022

Lyme disease is carried by black-legged ticks and infects people when they are bitten and transmit the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. Black-legged ticks are especially common in the northeastern United States, and people are exposed to the ticks usually during outdoor activities.
Read more
Image: Thomas Herrmannsdörfer and Richard Funk working on a magnetic coil; Copyright: HZDR / Amac Garbe

HZDR / Amac Garbe

Pulsed magnetic fields to fight neurodegenerative diseases

10/03/2022

In motor neuron diseases of the nervous system, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commands can no longer be sent to the muscles.
Read more
Image: Microscopic image of immune cells ; Copyright: Fraunhofer ITEM

Fraunhofer ITEM

Checking the immune response in the lungs

07/03/2022

Patients in clinical trials must undergo thorough examination in order to allow the effects of new medications to be determined as precisely as possible.
Read more
Image: A used surgical mask is hanging from a branch in the woods; Copyright: PantherMedia/Valery Vvoennyy

PantherMedia/Valery Vvoennyy

Medical consumables: Will the pandemic inspire more sustainable practices?

01/03/2022

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a global increase in healthcare commodities and medical consumables: demand for face masks, gloves, protective apparel, and other personal protective equipment has soared as a result. This also applies to rapid tests, reagents, laboratory equipment and supplies. But all this sparked a myriad of problems.
Read more
Image: Microscopic image of immune cells in the alveoli of a mouse.; Copyright: Sara Gholamhosseinian Najjar + Michaela Burkon

Sara Gholamhosseinian Najjar + Michaela Burkon

Cell therapy: Immune cells "forget culture shock" after laboratory stay

01/03/2022

A recent study shows that certain immune cells can restore their normal functions when introduced back into the body, even after being multiplied in the laboratory to large numbers – the results pave the way to new cell therapies.
Read more
Image: Professor Dr. Constanza Figueiredo and Professor Dr. Rainer Blasczyk; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

Designer blood from stem cells

28/02/2022

Blood transfusions are among the most common procedures in hospitals. According to the German Red Cross, around 15,000 blood donations are needed every day in Germany alone. But only about four percent of potential blood donors actually donate blood - and the trend is downward.
Read more
Image: BioServe's Brian Medaugh and Dr. Luis Zea preparing the cells for integration into the flight hardware; Copyright: Image courtesy of Ivan Castro

Image courtesy of Ivan Castro

MicroQuin to launch cancer research to space station

24/02/2022

An investigation from biotechnology startup MicroQuin launching to the International Space Station (ISS) on Northrop Grumman’s 17th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) aims to better understand the onset and progression of cancer.
Read more
Image: An image of protein molecules; Copyright: PantherMedia / animaxx3d

PantherMedia / animaxx3d

Artificial intelligence can help to study protein complexes

21/02/2022

Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg have developed a new method for studying proteins
Read more
Image: The 3D wound closure printer on parabolic flight; Copyright: Bianca Lemke / BIH

Bianca Lemke / BIH

For use in outer space: Biological bandages from a 3D printer

21/02/2022

Scientists at the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) have teamed up with a company called Cellbricks to develop a 3D printer that can produce a biological wound closure. This could be a good alternative to autologous skin grafting, and not just for burn victims on Earth: Astronauts could also be treated individually far away from any hospital.
Read more
Image: Care workers in overalls in a patient room; Copyright: PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia ltd

PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia ltd

Better management of hospital resources in pandemic times through DNA measurement

15/02/2022

For nearly two years, the COVID-19 pandemic has kept a firm grip on the world and caused many intensive care units to hit full capacity. It would help medical professionals tremendously if they could make a reliable prognosis the moment patients are hospitalized. cfDNA screening could play an important role in the assessment of COVID-19 severity in patients.
Read more
Image: A person with a smartphone in hand is standing in front of a computer-generated model of the liver; Copyright: PantherMedia/happysuthida

PantherMedia/happysuthida

AI-driven laboratory diagnostics with medicalvalues

25/01/2022

Lab results are often complex and not easy to interpret. For many diseases, a medical diagnosis requires the analysis and combination of different values. That’s why one of the themes at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM at MEDICA 2021 highlighted "Integrative and AI-driven diagnostics" - and illustrated how AI can help interpret laboratory results and values.
Read more
Image: A person in a lab coat is holding a device with an antenna extended into a glass; Coypright: Universität des Saarlandes

Universität des Saarlandes

Coronavirus: Using odors to detect an infection

10/01/2022

Rapid COVID-19 tests can be rather uncomfortable as samples are typically collected with a deep nasal or throat swab. Scientists now explore an alternative to rapid diagnostic tests based on a patient’s breath.
Read more
Image: The KUKA robot sorts blood samples according to the color of their cap; Copyright: LT Automation

Image: The KUKA robot sorts blood samples according to the color of their cap; Copyright: LT Automation

Fast, accurate, automatic: Simplifying workflows with laboratory robots

01/10/2021

Unpacking and sorting of blood samples from general practitioners is a monotonous and time-consuming task. The Aalborg University Hospital has now automated the process: Up to 3000 blood samples every day are unpacked and sorted by two lab robots provided by LT Automation. Furthermore, the samples are temperature monitored and tracked, using the Intelligent Transport Boxes.
Read more
Image: Data sheets and ampoules on a desk; Copyright: PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

Diligent helpers in data analysis: How AI becomes transparent and reproducible

01/10/2021

Huge amounts of data are generated in the laboratory every day, which have to be analyzed by hand. This is where artificial intelligence (AI) comes into play as a perfect helper: Because it evaluates such data volumes faster than humans ever could. The only problem with AI is: when it is developed, there is hardly any guideline or standard that makes AI systems comparable with each other.
Read more
Image: a robot arm transporting a petri dish; Copyright: PantherMedia / angellodeco

PantherMedia / angellodeco

The smart lab: The shift to more digitization is picking up speed

01/10/2021

They have probably never been in the spotlight as much as during the pandemic: laboratories. In Germany alone, around 73 million COVID-19-tests have been evaluated since the beginning of 2020. And even away from Corona, laboratory physicians have a lot to do – blood, urine and aspirates have to be evaluated every day. That results in an enormous amount of work, just in terms of organization.
Read more
Image: a robot arm holding a small glass; Copyright: PantherMedia / Bork

PantherMedia / Bork

The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization

01/10/2021

In the laboratory, there is some work that is time-consuming and monotonous – making it the perfect place for digital solutions such as artificial intelligence or robotics. But what work can these systems really take on in a meaningful way, in which areas of the lab are they present today, and where do they still need to be improved?
Read more
Image: An emergency physician is measuring the blood pressure of an injured boy on a stretcher; Copyright: PantherMedia/Arne Trautmann

Emergency medicine: point-of-care diagnostic at the deployment site

01/06/2021

The sooner diagnosis can be made during an emergency, the faster the patient receives help. While most diagnostics still take place at the hospital, emergency physicians use more and more mobile devices directly at the deployment site. This is how they can save precious time. We take a look at some point-of-care applications in our Topic of the Month.
Read more
Image: Close-up of an ultrasound head in the gloved hand of a physician; Copyright: PantherMedia/Bork

Faster treatment thanks to point-of-care diagnostics – in emergencies and beyond

01/06/2021

Making an informed and immediate treatment decision near or at the patient’s bedside – point-of-care testing (also known as POCT) makes this possible. Unlike stationary devices, special exam rooms or other service infrastructure, POC diagnostic devices offer a multitude of benefits including more flexibility, faster results, and lower costs.
Read more
Image: Rescue team in action; Copyright: PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

Mobile and intelligent – emergency blood analysis

08/03/2021

Things need to move fast in an emergency. Making the right call in this setting can be a challenge for emergency medical services – especially when symptoms are ambiguous, which is the case if a patient has difficulty breathing or exhibits a cardiovascular or poisoning emergency. A blood analysis is paramount to deliver a fast and accurate diagnosis. This is where mobOx comes in.
Read more
Image: Laboratory robot Kevin; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

Fraunhofer IPA

Alone in the lab – robot Kevin relieves the staff

08/12/2020

If Kevin was alone in the lab at night, the next morning, the workers will not find chaos, but labeled tubes and prepared samples. Kevin is a laboratory robot developed by Fraunhofer IPA to relieve the strain on laboratory workers so that they can concentrate on the essentials: research and diagnostics.
Read more
Image: three vials, one with hydrogels, one with bio ink and one with unmodified gelatine; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGB

"Cells are highly sensitive" – material development for bioprinting

01/12/2020

The big hope of bioprinting is to someday be able to print whole human organs. So far, the process has been limited to testing platforms such as organs-on-a-chip. That's because the actual printing process already poses challenges. Scientists need suitable printing materials that ensure the cell's survival as it undergoes the procedure. The Fraunhofer IGB is researching and analyzing this aspect.
Read more
Image: 3D printer with a human heart inside, next to a box with

Bioprinting: life from the printer

01/12/2020

It aims at the production of test systems for drug research and gives patients on the waiting lists for donor organs hope: bioprinting. Thereby biologically functional tissues are printed. But how does that actually work? What are the different bioprinting methods? And can entire organs be printed with it? These and other questions are examined in our Topic of the Month.
Read more
Image: cell matrix; Copyright: TU Wien

Multi-photon lithography: printing cells with micrometer accuracy

01/12/2020

How do cells react to certain drugs? And how exactly is new tissue created? This can be analyzed by using bioprinting to embed cells in fine frameworks. However, current methods are often imprecise or too slow to process cells before they are damaged. At the TU Vienna, a high-resolution bioprinting process has now been developed using a new bio-ink.
Read more
Image: Illustrations of various 3D-printed prostheses, implants and organs; Copyright: PantherMedia/annyart

Printed life – possibilities and limits of bioprinting

01/12/2020

Implants, prostheses and various other components made of plastic, metal or ceramics are already being produced by additive manufacturing. But skin, blood vessels or entire organs from the printer – is that possible? For years now, intensive research has been underway into the production of biologically functional tissue using printing processes. Some things are already possible with bioprinting.
Read more
Image: A young laboratory technician with AR glasses uses a pipette, he is surrounded by different bubbles with text; Copyright: Helbling Technik Wil AG

Augmented Reality for better laboratory results

01/09/2020

Accuracy is paramount in laboratory settings and ensures that lab results are valid. Errors in a lab can render series of tests unusable and waste precious time and money. In the medical realm, this might even result in clinical trial errors. Augmented reality (AR) can help laboratory technicians to prevent errors and guide their work in the future.
Read more
Image: View into an automated laboratory machine that stores a lot of vials; Copyright: PantherMedia/kagemusha

The smart networking laboratory: when connected devices become one system

01/09/2020

Diagnostics, biomedical research, screening active ingredient candidates - laboratories perform many functions and must be flexible. Growing and evolving healthcare demands mean labs have to process an increasing number of samples. Modern laboratory information management systems can already support high-throughput, but a smart laboratory environment can make things even more efficient.
Read more
Image: View into a device that automatically processes laboratory samples; Copyright: PantherMedia/Sonar

The laboratory 4.0: networked analyses

01/09/2020

There is likely no other branch of medicine where you can find as many high-tech devices as in modern laboratories. A major part of diagnostic and biomedical research is done here. A lot of individual steps in work processes need to be followed precisely to ensure the results’ quality. Also, a lot of data is generated here.
Read more
Image: A miniaturized, round sensor under a fingertip; Copyright: TU Dresden

SmartLab: all-in-one automation, digitalization, and miniaturization

01/09/2020

Laboratories have to analyze and interpret an ever-increasing number of samples for research and diagnostic services, generating lots of data in the process. At the same time, labs are required to produce quality results and operate with speed. Processes that could once be managed using laboratory notebooks and isolated systems must become smart in the future to improve lab efficiency.
Read more
Image: medical symbols around the earth in the hands of a person; Copyright: PantherMedia/everythingposs

PantherMedia/everythingposs

Israeli medical devices showcase digital innovations at MEDICA

24/08/2020

For the annual MEDICA trade fair, companies from all over the world assemble in Düsseldorf. The Israel Export Institute has been a part of it for the last couple of years. They present medical devices and digital innovations from different Israeli companies at their joint booth.
Read more
Image: Two people wearing protective suits stand next to a workbench in a laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT/Foto Bernd Müller

Fraunhofer IBMT/Foto Bernd Müller

epiLab: Coronavirus testing in the mobile safety laboratory

08/07/2020

A key to preventing SARS-CoV-2 spread is frequent, comprehensive testing. This allows the early detection of infections and helps break the chain of infection. It always comes down to Coronavirus testing capacity. In Germany's southwest state of Saarland, the mobile epiLab (epidemiological laboratory) supports the search for infections lurking in nursing homes and long-term care facilities.
Read more
Image: Transmission of medical data of an athlete to a laptop; Copyright: PantherMedia / Viktor Cap

PantherMedia / Viktor Cap

Sports medicine software: Monitoring at the push of a button

22/05/2020

Athletes not only have to be fit and stay in shape, but they also have to achieve peak performance, especially when they get ready for athletic events. Optimized and individualized performance training requires data from external laboratories and institutes. The [i/med] Sports platform from DORNER Health IT Solutions provides a complete workflow − from anamnesis to diagnostic report.
Read more
Image: Microscope next to a screen showing pictures of bacteria cultures; Copyright: PantherMedia/shmeljov

Laboratory safety: infection prevention in the work area

01/04/2020

What goes in, must not come out - and must also not cause harm to anyone working inside the lab. That's perhaps a nice way of summing up "laboratory safety" in one sentence - at least wherever pathogens are handled in biological and medical settings. The necessary laboratory safety precautions primarily depend on what is waiting "inside".
Read more
Image: A female researcher with face mask, gloves and cap puts an object slide on a microscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

Laboratory work: the right personal protective equipment is crucial

01/04/2020

When working with infectious materials and organisms in the laboratory, safe handling and appropriate training are of utmost importance. Another central component is personal protective equipment designed to prevent contact with tissue, liquids and aerosols and protect the wearer.
Read more
Image: A researcher sits at a laboratory bench and puts gloves at his hands; Copyright: PantherMedia/dragana.stock@gmail.com

The safe laboratory – protection through technology

01/04/2020

When biomedical researchers or diagnosticians work with potentially contagious materials like cell cultures, blood or tissue, they need absolute protection from pathogens. Both safety measures in the workspace and the correct tools and materials are key here. Learn in our Topic of the Month what is important for protection in the lab and what a safe laboratory looks like.
Read more
Image: Researcher with gloves and protective suit is working at a microscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/EvgeniyShkolenko

BSL-4 laboratories: highest levels of safety and protection

01/04/2020

Laboratories are sectioned into four biosafety levels to dictate the precautions required to isolate dangerous biological agents. The highest level of biological safety, BSL-4, is perhaps the most well-known when we think of containing pathogens and microbes. However, the fewest number of laboratories actually fall into the BSL-4 category.
Read more
Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
Read more
Image: Blood sample labelled

panthermedia.net/olanstock

Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08/11/2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
Read more
Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04/11/2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
Read more
Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04/11/2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
Read more
Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
Read more
Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01/10/2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
Read more
Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23/09/2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
Read more
Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22/08/2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
Read more
Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
Read more
Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
Read more
Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01/08/2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
Read more
Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08/07/2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
Read more
Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
Read more
Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
Read more
Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
Read more
Image: About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stasique

panthermedia.net/stasique

Back pain: The research project Ran Rücken is intended to help

10/09/2018

About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime. Too much or the wrong movements can also cause problems. "Ran Rücken", the interdisciplinary research project aims to determine the right minimum dose of exercise that proves effective. (Explanatory note: "Ran Rücken" can be loosely translated as "Target the Back")
Read more
Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
Read more
Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
Read more
Image:

Empa

"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
Read more