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Image: a woman is getting her eyes scanned for diseases; Copyright: PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

Deep Learning: How artificial neural networks can support diagnostics

03/12/2021

The use of artificial intelligence and deep learning in medical diagnostics is growing rapidly. Ubotica’s neural network is based on deep learning and detects the presence of diabetic retinopathy in retinal images. Dr. Holger Pfeifer talks about the project successes, and reveals the obstacles researchers must continue to overcome in adopting deep learning systems.
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Image: Trained ophthalmic assistants use an adapted smartphone for retinal imaging; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB) / Sankara Eye Foundation India

With smartphones against blindness

03/12/2021

Damage to the retina due to diabetes is now considered the most common cause of blindness in adults. This makes early detection of so-called diabetic retinopathy all the more important. But for diabetics living in poorer areas of the cities in India, there is a lack of adequate ophthalmological care. Therefore, the University Hospital Bonn has launched a smartphone-based telemedicine DR screening.
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Image: Blue eye surrounded by cyber technology; Copyright: PantherMedia  / hquality

Diabetes retinal screening through deep learning

11/11/2021

Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a complication of the retina brought about by diabetes, is one of the most frequent reasons for vision loss in European adults between 25 and 60 years of age. When detected early, treatment can effectively reduce or prevent vision loss. To date however, national screening programs have been available in only a few countries and even then, they are costly.
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Image: Diabetes detection from whole-body magnetic resonance imaging with deep learning; Copyright: DZD, JCI Insight

Diabetes detection with whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

13/10/2021

Type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with a whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. This is shown by a current study. They used deep learning methods* and data from more than 2000 MRIs to identify patients with (pre-) diabetes. The results have now been published in the journal JCI Insight.
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Image: Woman taking a blood sample from her finger for a blood glucose level test; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon (YAYMicro)

Two-hour glucose tolerance test predicts decline in episodic memory

21/09/2021

Diabetes is a risk factor for cognitive decline. In a study of the University of Turku and Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, the researchers observed that already a higher two-hour glucose level in the glucose tolerance test predicts worse performance in a test measuring episodic memory after ten years. Decline in episodic memory is one of the first symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.
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Image: Two small, angular-shaped, electrical devices that are held with tweezers; Copyright: Fraunhofer EMFT/Bernd Müller

Tumor therapy: drug delivery pump instead of injection

01/02/2021

Drugs always have undesired side effects. Cytostatics are powerful drugs used to treat cancer. They reach almost all cells in the body, killing healthy cells as well as cancer cells in the process. A targeted delivery to the specific cellular site would be a gentler treatment.
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Image: Artist’s rendering of small star-shaped machines between red blood cells; Copyright: PantherMedia/Michael Osterrieder

Autonomous medical devices: running well in your body

01/02/2021

In theory, autonomous medical technologies can be used in a diagnostic or therapeutic capacity inside the body under certain conditions. This may not sound like a new invention at first. After all, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators have monitored and fixed abnormal heart rhythm for many years.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22/03/2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Image: Glucometer next to a smartphone that shows the blood glucose level; Copyright: panthermedia.net/simpson33

DiaDigital: making sense of diabetes apps

02/01/2019

While they are very useful, health apps have one major drawback: anyone can release and distribute them unchecked. Only some apps require medical device certification. So how can users spot a great, safe and useful app? When it comes to diabetes apps, the “DiaDigital” seal of distinction is the answer.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02/01/2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21/11/2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Image: man holding his stomach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ByLove

The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22/05/2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
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Image: Man with stethoscope and medical symbols; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Between austerity measures and growth pressure - Latin America's medical market

03/04/2018

A region whose states make up the world's third largest economy and which has few linguistic differences - Latin America is an attractive market for foreign companies at first glance. This also applies to the medical market. However, various factors are contributing to the fact that this market is growing only slowly in most countries.
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