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Image: biosensor platform consisting of graphene layers; Copyright: Letao Yang, KiBum Lee, Jin-Ho Lee and Sy-Tsong (Dean) Chueng

Biosensor: technology created for stem cells

12.11.2019

A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other neurological disorders.
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Image: dna string; Copyright: MIPT Press Office

Genetic data: a method to standardize analysis

12.11.2019

MIPT researchers have collaborated with Atlas Biomedical Holding and developed a new bioinformatics data analysis method. The developed program, EphaGen, can be used for quality control when diagnosing genetic diseases. The team published the article in Nucleic Acid Research.
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Image: depiction of a disruption of immune cells; Copyright: Gerrit Müller/Freie Universität Berlin

Immunology: why beta-blockers cause skin inflammation

08.11.2019

Beta-blockers are often used to treat high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases. However, in some patients they can trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease. Scientists at the University of Bonn and Freie Universität Berlin have now found a possible cause for this. Their results have been published in the renowned journal "Autophagy".
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Image: material with scaffold structure; Copyright: Tomsk Polytechnic University

Regenerative medicine: material for cell immune response

04.11.2019

Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Montana (USA) proposed a new promising material for regenerative medicine for recovery of damaged tissues and blood vessels.
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Image: cancer cell gets treated with sound; Copyright: Tohoku University

Cancer treatment: attacking with sound

30.10.2019

Drugs can be safely delivered to cancerous lymph nodes via the lymphatic system and then released inside the nodes using sound waves. Tohoku University researchers tested the treatment on mice with metastatic breast cancer and published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Image: brain cells in a piece of a mouse cortex; Copyright: J Kuhl (somedonkey.com), Motta, Wissler (c) MPI for Brain Research

Brain mapping: unraveling the dense networks

29.10.2019

The methods to analyze neuronal networks sparsely have been available for decades, the dense mapping of neuronal circuits is a major scientific challenge. Researchers from the MPI for Brain Research have now succeeded in the dense connectomic mapping of brain tissue from the cerebral cortex, and quantify the possible imprint of learning in the circuit.
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Image: 3D-printed cell in a laboratory; Copyright: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech

3D-printing: finds cancer cells

29.10.2019

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.
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Image: a protein adapter in the blood stream; Copyright: MPI-P

Cells: toxin, trauma, therapy?

28.10.2019

The department of Prof. Tanja Weil at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research has, in cooperation with the group of Prof. Holger Barth from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Ulm University, shown in initial laboratory tests that they are able to specifically modulate processes in human white blood cells in vitro.
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Image: medial prefrontal cortex; Copyright: Drs. Christopher Parkhurst and David Artis (WCM)

Cells: gut health influences brain health

25.10.2019

Over the last two decades, scientists have observed a clear link between autoimmune disorders and a variety of psychiatric conditions. For example, people with autoimmune disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), psoriasis and multiple sclerosis may also have depleted gut microbiota and experience anxiety, depression and mood disorders.
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Image: Brown cancer cells with other blue cell types in a schematic depiction; Copyright: Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine

Radiotherapy: breaking the stroma barrier

22.10.2019

Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Patients with pancreatic cancer often receive chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which are not always effective and can have toxic side effects. The method may offer an effective treatment for pancreatic cancer with fewer side effects in surrounding organs.
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Image: Cells in a 3D scaffold; Copyright: TU Wien

Bioprinting: living cells in a 3D printer

22.10.2019

Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework. This is achieved using additive 3D printing methods - so called "bioprinting" techniques. However, some methods are very imprecise or only allow a very short time window in which the cells can be processed without being damaged.
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Image: close-up of a liver cancer stem-like cell; Copyright: Dr Toh Tan Boon, NUS N.1 Institute for Health

Cells: potential liver cancer treatment

10.10.2019

Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The most common primary liver cancer in adults is known as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and accounts for approximately 780.000 deaths every year. Even with advanced surgical treatments or transplantation, the 5-year survival rate for HCC patients remains poor due to frequent recurrence.
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Image: model image of pathogens; Copyright: Sebastian Geibel

Pathogens: new insights in tuberculosis

10.10.2019

Researchers at the University of Würzburg and the Spanish Cancer Research Centre have gained new insights into the pathogen that causes tuberculosis. The work published in Nature provides the basis for a new approach in antibiotic therapy.
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Image: blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thelightwriter

Blood vessels: overly permeable

09.10.2019

In Germany alone there are around 400,000 patients who suffer from chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. For the first time, researchers have discovered that dysfunctions in blood vessels play a significant role in the development of such diseases. In experimental model systems, the progression of the disease slowed down significantly by eliminating these dysfunctions.
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Image: immunofluorescence of spleen sections of a mice; Copyright: IMP

Pathogens: a mechanism to control autoimmunity

08.10.2019

The immune system relies on B cells and their ability to make antibodies against an extremely broad range of pathogens. This broad responsiveness bears some risk, as B cells can also turn against healthy tissue - a phenomenon called autoimmunity.
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Image: cells devouring tumor cells under a microscope; Copyright: Dr Fotini Vogiatzi

Immunotherapy: a promising antibody

07.10.2019

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. This form of blood cancer is caused by malignant abnormal precursor cells of certain white blood cells, and usually leads to a rapidly progressive reduction of bone marrow function, and thus impaired blood formation.
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Image: Blood in test tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/scanrail

Cells: mechanism for the formation of new blood vessels

24.09.2019

Researchers from Uppsala University have revealed for the first time a mechanism for how new blood vessels are formed and have shown the importance of this mechanism for embryo survival and organ function. The results could be developed to control the formation of new blood vessels in different diseases. The new study is published in the journal EMBO Reports.
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Image: Illustrated DNA string; Copyright: Yen Strandqvist/Chalmers University of Technology

DNA: held together by hydrophobic forces

23.09.2019

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, disprove the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. It is not, as is generally believed, hydrogen bonds which bind together the two sides of the DNA structure. Instead, water is the key. The discovery opens doors for new understanding in research in medicine and life sciences. The researchers' findings are presented in the journal PNAS.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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