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Image: graphic illustration of breast cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/decade3d

Cells: blocking metastasis-promoting enzyme

15.11.2019

In a breakthrough with important implications for the future of immunotherapy for breast cancer, UC San Francisco scientists have found that blocking the activity of a single enzyme can prevent a common type of breast cancer from spreading to distant organs.
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Image: depiction of cells; Copyright: Yu Jung Shin

Cells: oxygen-starved tumor cells promoting cancer spread

08.11.2019

Using cells from human breast cancers and mouse breast cancer models, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have significant new evidence that tumor cells exposed to low-oxygen conditions have an advantage when it comes to invading and surviving in the bloodstream.
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Image: depiction of a disruption of immune cells; Copyright: Gerrit Müller/Freie Universität Berlin

Immunology: why beta-blockers cause skin inflammation

08.11.2019

Beta-blockers are often used to treat high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases. However, in some patients they can trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease. Scientists at the University of Bonn and Freie Universität Berlin have now found a possible cause for this. Their results have been published in the renowned journal "Autophagy".
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Image: Man using a machine for producing cells; Copyright: Empa

Bone: dissolving screws

07.11.2019

Where bones fracture, surgeons often have to join the fragments with implants. Magnesium orthopaedic screws, which over time dissolve in the body, spare patients another operation after healing is completed and reduce the risk of infection. To develop optimized alloys and orthopaedic screws with functionalized surfaces, Empa researchers are now investigating magnesium corrosion.
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Image: diagram of the impact of raindrops pressure on a windshield; Copyright: Pei Zhong, Duke University

Pulverize kidney stones: like windshield-cracking raindrops

07.11.2019

A plane has to be going pretty fast for a mere raindrop to crack its windshield, but it can happen. Now, new models of the physics behind the improbable feat may just help doctors crack kidney stones to pieces.
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Image: cancer cell gets treated with sound; Copyright: Tohoku University

Cancer treatment: attacking with sound

30.10.2019

Drugs can be safely delivered to cancerous lymph nodes via the lymphatic system and then released inside the nodes using sound waves. Tohoku University researchers tested the treatment on mice with metastatic breast cancer and published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Image: 3D-printed cell in a laboratory; Copyright: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech

3D-printing: finds cancer cells

29.10.2019

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.
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Image: a protein adapter in the blood stream; Copyright: MPI-P

Cells: toxin, trauma, therapy?

28.10.2019

The department of Prof. Tanja Weil at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research has, in cooperation with the group of Prof. Holger Barth from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Ulm University, shown in initial laboratory tests that they are able to specifically modulate processes in human white blood cells in vitro.
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Image: Brown cancer cells with other blue cell types in a schematic depiction; Copyright: Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine

Radiotherapy: breaking the stroma barrier

22.10.2019

Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Patients with pancreatic cancer often receive chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which are not always effective and can have toxic side effects. The method may offer an effective treatment for pancreatic cancer with fewer side effects in surrounding organs.
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Image: Modern diabetes therapies; Copyright: beta-web GmbH

Digital and personalized diabetes management

21.10.2019

Digital blood glucose measurement via a sensor on the arm, glucose values in an app and data evaluation with the help of software: diabetes experts, product specialists at Roche Diabetes Care Germany and a patient talk in our report on MEDICA.de about the future of diabetes treatment.
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Image: smartphone in the hand of a person; Copyright: panthermedia.net/leszekglasner

App: reminds heart patients to take their pills

21.10.2019

Heart patients using a smartphone app reminder are more likely to take their medication than those who receive written instructions, according to a study. "We hypothesised that the app would increase adherence by 30 percent, but the impact was even greater," said study author Dr Cristian M. Garmendia, of the Cardiovascular Institute of Buenos Aires.
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Image: a microfluidic chip; Copyright: Sia Lab/Columbia Engineering and OPKO Health

Diagnostics: rapid test for Lyme disease

16.10.2019

Some 300,000 people in the United Stated are diagnosed with Lyme disease every year. Caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted by the bite of infected Ixodes ticks, the disease if left untreated can cause serious neurologic, cardiac, and/or rheumatologic complications.
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Image: robot with artificial skin; Copyright: Astrid Eckert / TUM

Robots: sensory ability through artificial skin

11.10.2019

Sensitive synthetic skin enables robots to sense their own bodies and surroundings - a crucial capability if they are to be in close contact with people. Inspired by human skin, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a system combining artificial skin with control algorithms and used it to create the first autonomous humanoid robot with full-body artificial skin.
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Image: lung tissue under a microscope; Copyright: Takezaki et al., 2019

Gene: new therapeutic target for pulmonary fibrosis

11.10.2019

Researchers in Japan have identified a genetic mutation that causes idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by killing the cells lining the lung's airways. The study, which will be published October 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that protecting these cells by inhibiting a cell death pathway called necroptosis could be a new therapeutic approach to treating IPF.
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Image: model image of pathogens; Copyright: Sebastian Geibel

Pathogens: new insights in tuberculosis

10.10.2019

Researchers at the University of Würzburg and the Spanish Cancer Research Centre have gained new insights into the pathogen that causes tuberculosis. The work published in Nature provides the basis for a new approach in antibiotic therapy.
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Image: blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thelightwriter

Blood vessels: overly permeable

09.10.2019

In Germany alone there are around 400,000 patients who suffer from chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. For the first time, researchers have discovered that dysfunctions in blood vessels play a significant role in the development of such diseases. In experimental model systems, the progression of the disease slowed down significantly by eliminating these dysfunctions.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08.10.2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: immunofluorescence of spleen sections of a mice; Copyright: IMP

Pathogens: a mechanism to control autoimmunity

08.10.2019

The immune system relies on B cells and their ability to make antibodies against an extremely broad range of pathogens. This broad responsiveness bears some risk, as B cells can also turn against healthy tissue - a phenomenon called autoimmunity.
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Image: interneuron string on a black background; Copyright: Leonie Pothmann/Uni Bonn

Cells: epilepsy disrupting "brake cells" functions

07.10.2019

In some forms of epilepsy, the function of certain "brake cells" in the brain is presumed to be disrupted. This may be one of the reasons why the electrical malfunction is able to spread from the point of origin across large parts of the brain. A current study by the University of Bonn, in which researchers from Lisbon were also involved, points in this direction.
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Image: cells devouring tumor cells under a microscope; Copyright: Dr Fotini Vogiatzi

Immunotherapy: a promising antibody

07.10.2019

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. This form of blood cancer is caused by malignant abnormal precursor cells of certain white blood cells, and usually leads to a rapidly progressive reduction of bone marrow function, and thus impaired blood formation.
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Image: cancer cells; Copyright: The University of Texas at Dallas

Imaging: brighter way for capturing cancer during surgery

04.10.2019

University of Texas at Dallas researchers have demonstrated that imaging technology used to map the universe shows promise for more accurately and quickly identifying cancer cells in the operating room.
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Image: scientist researches with light; Copyright: panthermedia.net / lightpoet

Optoceutics: A new technique using light for regenerative medicine

03.10.2019

Using light to facilitate the formation of new blood vessels: it is the breakthrough outcome of a research study carried out by researchers at Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) in Milan (Italy). The study was published in Science Advances.
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Image: a 3d-printer at work; Copyright: panthermedia.net / prescott10

3D printing: new technique for biomaterials

03.10.2019

A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. Developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, the technique could be used to print soft biomaterials that could be used to repair defects in the body.
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Image: detail of the microneedle biosensor; Copyright: Imperial College London

Biosensor: detecting patient's antibiotic levels with microneedles

02.10.2019

Small, non-invasive patches worn on the skin can accurately detect the levels of medication in a patient's system, matching the accuracy of current clinical methods. In a small-scale clinical evaluation, researchers at Imperial College London have shown for the first time how microneedle biosensors can be used to monitor the changing concentration of antibiotics.
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Image: Functions of the bio-T plattform; Copyright: bio-T Medical

Medical IoT: fully realizing the potential of medical device data

01.10.2019

The Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) plays an important role in monitoring patients in hospitals or performing measurements at home. Here medical devices are connected via cloud, where all patient measurement data are collected and analyzed. In the course of digitalization, the relevance of clouds in the medical sector is constantly increasing.
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Image: artificial skin on the index finger; Copyright: EPFL

Biotechnology: artificial skin for rehabilitation

27.09.2019

Just like our senses of hearing and vision, our sense of touch plays an important role in how we perceive and interact with the world around us. And technology capable of replicating our sense of touch - also known as haptic feedback - can greatly enhance human-computer and human-robot interfaces for applications such as medical rehabilitation and virtual reality.
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Image: woman in front of a mirrow and her virtual reality image; Copyright: ViTraS

Virtual reality: avatars against obesity

26.09.2019

New therapies against excessive weight: A collaborative project led by the University of Würzburg develops virtual reality methods to positively affect the body perception of obese patients.
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Image: tissue in a glass container; Copyright: Fraunhofer FEP

Implants: innovative multi-component procedure

25.09.2019

The Fraunhofer FEP has developed a process, called SULEEI, which makes it possible to sterilize and preserve decellularized pericardial tissue by means of photo-initiated ultraviolet crosslinking with low-energy electron irradiation.
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Image: silver nanopillars on a blue background; Copyright: Northwestern University

Nanotechnology: tiny biocompatible laser

25.09.2019

Nanolaser has potential to treat neurological disorders or sense disease biomarkers. Researchers have developed a tiny nanolaser that can function inside of living tissues without harming them. Just 50 to 150 nanometers thick, the laser is about 1/1,000th the thickness of a single human hair.
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 Image: Research team of nonoparticle sensor; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Optical sensor: detects very low glucose concentrations

17.09.2019

The Optical Research Group of the Universitat Jaume I has developed an optical nanoparticle sensor capable of detecting very low glucose concentrations, such as those present in a person's tear, by means of fluorescent carbon quantum dots, applying synthesis of nanomaterials based on irradiation with ultra-short lasers, which is an alternative, sustainable and non-polluting method.
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Image: scan of a lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Guzel

Imaging: reducing lung cancer mortality

10.09.2019

A combination of the EarlyCDT-Lung Test followed by CT imaging in Scottish patients at risk for lung cancer resulted in a significant decrease in late stage diagnosis of lung cancer and may decrease lung cancer specific mortality, according to research presented at IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).
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Image: tablet in the hands of a medical person; Copyright: panthermedia.net/billiondigital

mHealth: app assessment for multiple sclerosis

10.09.2019

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have developed and validated a tablet-based app that offers a faster, easier and more accurate way for health care providers who don't have specialized training to assess the cognitive function of people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
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Image: woman sitting down; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee

Stem cells: antihistamines can kill leukaemic stem cells

09.09.2019

The IJC Leukaemic Stem Cell research group, led by Ruth M. Risueño, has discovered in preclinical trials that a particular group of antihistamines can kill leukaemic stem cells. This group investigates Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) and the cell population responsible for the disease spreading, persisting, and if it has been treated and overcome, reappear.
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Image: woman with inhaler and smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/familylifestyle

mHealth: self-monitoring solution for uncontrolled asthma

05.09.2019

A study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet shows that a treatment adjustment algorithm based on lung function and symptoms in a mobile phone can be an efficient tool in managing uncontrolled asthma. For fuss-free measuring of lung function, the phone connects to a wireless spirometer and the app can register respiratory symptoms and provide visual feedback on treatment.
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Image: arm of a dummy with a purple glove and a measuring device; Copyright: Purdue University/Chris Adam

Prosthetics: electronic glove offers 'humanlike' features

04.09.2019

People with hand amputations experience difficult daily life challenges, often leading to lifelong use of a prosthetic hands and services. An electronic glove, or e-glove, developed by Purdue University researchers can be worn over a prosthetic hand to provide humanlike softness, warmth, appearance and sensory perception, such as the ability to sense pressure, temperature and hydration.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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 Image: reasearcher in laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Islet-on-a-chip: miniature device for diabetes research

30.08.2019

In a study led by Harvard University's Kevin Kit Parker, microfluidics and human, insulin-producing beta cells have been integrated in an "Islet-on-a-Chip". The new device makes it easier for scientists to screen insulin-producing cells before transplanting them into a patient, test insulin-stimulating compounds, and study the fundamental biology of diabetes.
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Image: Displacement comparison at the end-systolic frame and final frame; Copyright: WMG University of Warwick

Imaging: new MRI technique spots scar heart muscles

30.08.2019

Traditional MRI scans use the metal gadolinium, which resonates areas of the heart muscles that are not functioning efficiently, however gadolinium affect the Kidney function. The new 3D MRI computing technique calculates strain in heart muscles showing which muscles are not functioning enough without damaging other organs - researchers at WMG, University of Warwick have found.
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Image: new microneedle patch; Copyright: Celestine Hong and Yanpu He

Skin substitute: medication delivery in one minute

29.08.2019

Nearly 100,000 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed every year, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Now, researchers have developed a fast-acting skin patch that efficiently delivers medication to attack melanoma cells. The device, tested in mice and human skin samples, is an advance toward developing a vaccine to treat melanoma and has widespread applications for other vaccines.
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Image: patient uses the new developed hydrogel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Genrix20061.mail.ru

Hydrogels: show promise in treating bone defects

28.08.2019

Bioengineers and dentists from the UCLA School of Dentistry have developed a new hydrogel that is more porous and effective in promoting tissue repair and regeneration compared to hydrogels that are currently available. Once injected in a mouse model, the new hydrogel is shown to induce migration of naturally occurring stem cells to better promote bone healing.
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Image: Capsule for small intestine endoscopy; Copyright: Fraunhofer IZM I Volker Mai

Imaging: faster intestine endoscopy with a pill-sized camera

28.08.2019

Greater resolution, sharper images, and more efficient diagnostic processes – this is the promise of an endoscopy capsule developed by Fraunhofer IZM to allow more detailed small intestine diagnostics.
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Image: Human holds hearing aid in hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Hearing aids: algorithms for personalized sounds

27.08.2019

The Hearing, Speech and Audio Technology Division (HSA) ft he Fraunhofer IDMT in Oldenburg is developing algorithms for hearing profiles which adjust themselves automatically and dynamically to the acoustic input signal: An easy way to personalized sound and good speech intelligibility for wearers of hearing aids, headphones and hearables.
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Image: view of a patient while waering augmented reality aid; Copyright: Scott Song for USC Roski Eye Institute

Augmented reality: glasses help people with low vision

27.08.2019

In a new study of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited degenerative eye disease that results in poor vision, Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers found that adapted augmented reality (AR) glasses can improve patients' mobility by 50% and grasp performance by 70%.
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Image: Bitcoin-App for medication dose; Copyright: panthermedia.net/efired

mHealth: Bitcoin-technology improves medication dose

26.08.2019

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have developed a prototype of an app that may potentially prescribe the optimal dose of medicine for the individual patient, as well as prevent counterfeit products.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22.08.2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: wearable placed on the forehead of a man; Copyright: Bizen Maskey, Sunchon National University

Wearables: sensors detect what's in your sweat

21.08.2019

New easy-to-make sensors can provide real-time measurements of sweat rate and electrolytes and metabolites in perspiration. Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat.
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Image: blood samples; Copyright: Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing

Biomarker: health indication in old age

21.08.2019

Researchers on ageing from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) collaborate to link basic insights from model organisms to the causes of ageing in humans. They can determine the disease vulnerability of older people using a defined set of substances in the blood.
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Image: nanoparticles in a close-up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/raimund14

Precision medicine: graphene nanoflakes as a new tool

20.08.2019

Chemists funded by the SNSF have created a new compound for flexible drug delivery that specifically targets prostate cancer cells. Incorporating four different molecules, the compound prevents tumour cells from multiplying, can be detected by medical imaging and has staying power in the bloodstream.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08.07.2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01.07.2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01.07.2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01.07.2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03.06.2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03.06.2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Boy uses robot arm in front of a monitor with computer game, next to it stands the therapist; Copyright: Helios Klinik Hattingen

Rehab with a robot – robot-assisted therapy in neurology

03.06.2019

It takes consistent repetitions if rehab patients want to relearn skills after surviving a stroke. This requires extreme effort. The industrial sector uses robots to perform repetitive tasks or handle jobs that require strength. What has been a fixture in factories for decades is now also making its way into rehabilitation facilities.
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03.06.2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08.05.2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22.03.2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Image: Leg implants; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ monstArrr

Orthopedic implant: More comfortable thanks to full weight-bearing capacity

08.03.2019

Orthopedic implants – they are a necessity when it comes to congenital or acquired limb length discrepancies. However, full weight-bearing during the limb lengthening process is not feasible with previous implant models. For the first time, the 3D Surgery division at the Medical Center of the University of Munich has succeeded in using an implant that facilitates immediate weight-bearing.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01.03.2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01.03.2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
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Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01.03.2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
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Image: Dosage inhaler and stethoscope in front of a shelf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/liudmilachernetska@gmail.com

React early, breathe free – comprehensive COPD management

01.03.2019

COPD is considered the third most common cause of death worldwide and mainly affects smokers. It is not curable, but with the right combination of early diagnosis, therapy and self-management, a significant part of the quality of life can be regained. The comprehensive care is supported by various devices and technical tools. Learn more about the all-round care of COPD in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01.02.2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Woman at her desk holding her back; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrey Popov

AI ensures dynamic sitting

22.01.2019

Whether in the office, at school or behind the wheel: we spend a lot of time sitting and often stay in the same position for too long. The possible side effects are stiffness, back problems and pain. The SensA-Chair smart seating solution combats decreased mobility and ensures dynamic sitting.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – “TelePark“- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08.01.2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: Glucometer next to a smartphone that shows the blood glucose level; Copyright: panthermedia.net/simpson33

DiaDigital: making sense of diabetes apps

02.01.2019

While they are very useful, health apps have one major drawback: anyone can release and distribute them unchecked. Only some apps require medical device certification. So how can users spot a great, safe and useful app? When it comes to diabetes apps, the “DiaDigital” seal of distinction is the answer.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02.01.2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02.01.2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Electrical Effectiveness - healing methods alongside conventional Medicine

03.12.2018

Conventional medicine is taught at universities and is generally acknowledged. But other therapies have also proven their worth, such as electrical healing methods, which contribute to recovery and a better quality of life. In our Topic of the Month you learn about in which cases they are used, what their benefits are and what the current status of these methods is on the medical market.
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Back to health – when electrical pulses provide healing

03.12.2018

Strengthening and healing thanks to the power of electrical pulses - is that really possible? When mobility is restricted or muscles are no longer as strong as they used to be, electrical treatment options can lead to improvement or even cure of diseases. But why are more and more people turning to these alternatives, what are the advantages and what are their limitations and drawbacks?
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Image: Proband with a neuroprosthesis; Copyright: MoreGrasp

MoreGrasp – being able to grasp again with paraplegia

22.11.2018

Every year between 250.000 and 500.000 people suffer a spinal cord injury, MoreGrasp is intended to make their lives easier. The project aims to restore the lost gripping function in people with high paraplegia. Researchers at Graz University of Technology have developed a neuroprosthesis that is currently undergoing a feasibility study.
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The Future of X-Ray – Interview with PROTEC

14.11.2018

Since Konrad Röntgen discovered X-rays in 1895, this type of diagnosis has been part of everyday hospital routine. But what innovations will there still be in this area of imaging methods in 2018? PROTEC gives us an insight into the fascinating world of X-rays at MEDICA 2018.
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Healthcare data to go – Interview with medicus.ai

13.11.2018

New technologies lead to new challenges, but also open up new possibilities. At the stand of Medicus AI at MEDICA 2018, we will find out what they look like specifically for medicine. The company has developed an app that bundles all of a patient's health-related data and helps understand medical reports.
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Image: the model of a kidney with gripping tools and the adhesive; Copyright: Purenum GmbH

A clean kidney: Break then glue

08.11.2018

Not enough exercise, an unhealthy diet: Kidney stones develop when urine contains too many insoluble compounds and are now one of the most common diseases worldwide. The ailment annually affects 1.2 million people in Germany alone. The stones are broken up and taken out via endoscopic surgery. Now it’s possible to remove even the tiniest residual fragments. The solution: a biocompatible adhesive.
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Digitization: Hospitals as Popular Targets?

02.11.2018

It’s safe to say that patients and their prompt medical care take center stage at any hospital. Digitization of the healthcare sector is quickly advancing to make this a reality: data is stored in a digital medium, devices are linked together. But how safe are hospitals in the age of innovation?
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22.10.2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Lung Imaging – Keeping the Respiratory System Healthy

05.10.2018

Many people have damaged or suboptimally functioning lungs. An accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment are vital to protect this life-sustaining organ. Modern imaging solutions help physicians and patients understand what happens inside the lungs.
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Image: About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stasique

Back pain: The research project Ran Rücken is intended to help

10.09.2018

About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime. Too much or the wrong movements can also cause problems. "Ran Rücken", the interdisciplinary research project aims to determine the right minimum dose of exercise that proves effective. (Explanatory note: "Ran Rücken" can be loosely translated as "Target the Back")
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Image: View over the shoulder of a person with a tablet in his hand, showing the operating theatre in front of him with screens and devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Master plan Smart Hospital: well-connected is half cared for

03.09.2018

Artificial intelligence makes the diagnosis, robots perform the surgery and physicians manage all processes via touchscreen – is that what hospitals of the future will look like? And how far away are we actually from this future? Many hospital facilities are already on their way to becoming Smart Hospitals with the latest technology and where everything and everyone is linked and connected.
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Image: Computer generated model of a human body, consisting of a white grid; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kheng Ho Toh

Diagnosing diseases with big data

01.08.2018

All of us generate data every day without even realizing it – sometimes it happens unconsciously and unintentionally. At this point, we are made of data and not just in the eyes of tech companies but also from a healthcare system perspective. Our electronic health records are a smorgasbord of data for example.
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Image: Paramedics that transport a man towards an ambulance; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Artur Verkhovetskiy

Video streaming, apps, and smart glasses: telemedicine on standby

02.07.2018

Looking at the trends and innovations in emergency medicine, it is apparent that the idea of an ambulance as a kind of mobile emergency room that comes to patients, connects them with health professionals and makes a diagnosis en route to the hospital, is gaining momentum. The increased usage of telemedicine plays a big part in this development.
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Image: A woman is looking at her smartphone in bed. She looks tired and exhausted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/leungchopan

The STEADY project: Managing depression with wearables

01.06.2018

These days, smartphones and wearables of all kinds more or less "incidentally" collect lots of personal data about our lives. Many people have privacy and security concerns – and rightfully so – especially if mountains of data fall into the wrong hands. But what if patients collect their own data and get help to use it for their own purposes?
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The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22.05.2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
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Between austerity measures and growth pressure - Latin America's medical market

03.04.2018

A region whose states make up the world's third largest economy and which has few linguistic differences - Latin America is an attractive market for foreign companies at first glance. This also applies to the medical market. However, various factors are contributing to the fact that this market is growing only slowly in most countries.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01.03.2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01.03.2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01.02.2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Image: Young female student is sitting between shelves on the floor of a library and reads; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brock Jones

Patient science: patients research cystic fibrosis

22.01.2018

Research does not always occur in laboratory settings. As part of citizen science, citizens collect data and make it available for research projects. Now, this approach is also adopted in medicine by way of patient science: in a new project, patients take part in cystic fibrosis research. The goal is to improve the lives of those who are affected by this chronic disease.
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Intensive care medicine: More safety thanks to aviation knowledge

08.12.2017

What do intensive care medicine and aviation have in common? In both fields, mistakes can quickly put people's lives at risk. That's why high safety standards should be a matter of course for both. Having said that, medicine lags behind by comparison because staff members often lack the opportunities to train for emergency situations and the proper tools to prevent patients from being harmed.
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Serious Games - getting healthy while playing games

14.11.2017

Gaming is an activity that children as well as adults enjoy. They are fun and challenge our stamina. That’s why serious games are increasingly becoming popluar in physiotherapy and rehabilitation. MEDICA 2017 demonstrates already what applications are available here.
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Image: Male hands keep Smartwatch and Smartphone with the same health application side by side; Copyright: panthermedia. net/Alexey Boldin

mHealth: Doctor in your pocket

02.10.2017

Since the eHealth Law took effect on January 1, 2016, it has become apparent that digitization also affects the healthcare system. Its objective is to improve the digital infrastructure of healthcare. For several years, a subcategory of electronic healthcare solutions has enjoyed increasing popularity: mHealth.
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New Additions to MEDICA 2017 – MEDICA LABMED FORUM, MEDICA START-UP PARK, and MEDICA ACADEMY

02.10.2017

This year, expect a series of exciting innovations that include the informative and practice-oriented MEDICA ACADEMY, the START-UP PARK for newcomers and networkers from the startup arena and the interdisciplinary MEDICA LABMED Forum.
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Medical devices: the road to the finished product is not easy

08.09.2017

These days, many groups make various demands of medical device developers: manufacturers, users, patients and government agencies. Given all of these interests and concerns, the developers face many challenges. In this interview, we put some of them under the microscope and examine how they can be sidestepped or entirely avoided.
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Image: Colored sonographic image of the human heart from Doppler ultrasonography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Belish

Imaging techniques: ultrasound, MRI, CT, catheters and other procedures to keep a healthy heart

01.09.2017

Many people are affected by heart disease today because - among other reasons- our modern unhealthy lifestyle is taking a toll on our hearts. A reliable diagnosis and treatment are crucial for patients with heart disease since all other organs depend on the pumping of our vital organ. Modern imaging techniques are a key to understanding the heart.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01.08.2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: A dermatology laser is used to remove a mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Krause

Laser surgery: usability, flexibility, treatment quality

03.07.2017

The scalpel is considered the classic surgical instrument and as such, has remained unchanged for quite some time. However, today’s technology opens up a world of new possibilities for cutting tissue. Next to high-frequency electrosurgical scalpels that work with electric power, surgeons also use a variety of different lasers. They promise great usability and better treatment.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22.06.2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Modular Emergency Hospitals – Quick disaster response

08.06.2017

After earthquakes or other types of disasters, infrastructures are often damaged and local hospitals destroyed. A modular hospital, developed under the direction of the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department is designed to be ready for these types of disaster situations and support the emergency response.
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Image: In a movement laboratory, a man is wearing sensors on his legs and armst, while walking. During this he is being recorded and observed; Copyright: DAS BILD für ZHAW Gesundheit

"XoSoft" Project – Wearable Intelligent Exoskeleton

01.06.2017

After a stroke or as a result of aging, there are many situations when people are impaired in their walking ability and rely on a personal assistant or auxiliary aids and services. The XoSoft Project offers a solution: a soft exoskeleton that can be worn like a pair of leggings and stiffens or softens, depending on the situation.
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Image: Several people use the Armeo system and playing a videogame with it; Copyright: Hocoma, Schweiz

Exoskeletons, Serious Games and Co.: New Technologies in Rehabilitation

01.06.2017

A stroke, an accident or just because you are aging – there are many reasons to take advantage of physiotherapeutic or rehabilitative measures. More and more new technologies are designed to support patients in this process. They run the gamut from sensor technology and robotics to exergames and virtual reality.
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Image: Two elderly are sitting beside each other, looking on a screen, where a bingo game can be seen. One woman is standing up; Copyright: SilverFit, Robert ten Berge

SilverFit – Training and gaming for the elderly

01.06.2017

Movement is good for health, but people do it less and less as they age. The Dutch company SilverFit wants to counteract this. Their devices that combine sport and game are primarily aimed at elderly people. Their goal: to give people joy, fun and motivation to move – both in rehabilitation and in daily life.
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Image: Man typing on virtual question marks; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sebastien decoret

FAQ: Some questions concerning India

02.05.2017

There are recurring questions that companies are seeking to invest or produce in India. Here are some questions and their answers.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24.04.2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03.04.2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Light instead of darkness – Seeing with the Argus II Implant

29.03.2017

Retinitis pigmentosa is a hereditary eye disorder, which can lead to night blindness, restriction of the peripheral visual field and ultimately to blindness. The University Hospital Aachen, Germany, implants the Argus II retinal prosthesis system made by the Second Sight Company. It allows people with retinitis pigmentosa to perceive light and improve orientation.
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Pneumonia in Children: Ultrasound or X-Rays?

08.03.2017

Pneumonia is the most frequent respiratory disease in children and can even cause death. That is why it is extremely important to make an accurate diagnosis as quickly as possible. If this requires imaging tests, normally X-rays are taken. But there is an alternative: ultrasound.
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Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01.03.2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Image: Graphic of the generic architectur of the clinical data intelligence;  FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Medizinische Fakultät

Medical Databases: One for All, All for One

01.03.2017

In the "KDI – Clinical Data Intelligence Project", researchers are trying to consolidate various types of data to make them useable and useful to both medical professionals and scientists. This is a tremendous undertaking, considering the data volumes from different sources. In this conversation with MEDICA, Dr. Martin Sedlmayr explains the project setup.
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Working in pediatric hospice - not the place for sadness

21.02.2017

Work in children's and youth hospices is both fulfilling and trying. What the employees and honorary staff have to do, how the work is organized and what the special thing in the workplace hospice is, can be found in the video.
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Medical Device that fits in your pocket: music for Tinnitus relief

08.02.2017

Listening to your favorite music for at least 90 minutes a day and treating your tinnitus with it? Almost sounds too good to be true. Yet more and more German statutory health insurance providers pay for this treatment. We wanted to know more about it and spoke with Jörg Land, the CEO of Sonormed GmbH, about Tinnitracks.
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Stents versus Eye Drops: a new approach to aid glaucoma patients

01.02.2017

Using stents to treat glaucoma is not a new procedure but they have not been implanted into patients on a regular basis until only recently. But this is about to change, which is why MEDICA.de asked what these glaucoma mini-stents are able to do and who may be a good candidate for them. Professor Norbert Pfeiffer answered our questions.
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Swallowing Disorders – avoiding errors related to medication administration

27.01.2017

Dysphagia creates a stressful situation for patients. Added to this is the fact that acute errors in the treatment of swallowing disorders keep occurring when patients are administered drugs. How can patients with swallowing difficulties receive better care? We visited the Hüttenhospital Dortmund and asked Dr. Martin Jäger, an expert in this particular field.
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Project TeleView – Telemedicine for refugees

23.01.2017

Refugees who come to Germany struggle with language and cultural barriers – also when it comes to medical issues. Patients are often not able to state their medical history or acute conditions, which requires extra time and means increased costs for medical offices and shelters. The telemedicine project TeleView seeks to offer a solution to this problem.
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Telemedicine – Immediate and lower-cost care

12.01.2017

Long waiting times in medical practices are not a rarity. The telemedicine can provide remedy. The program of the Institute for Applied Telemedicine at the Heart and Diabetes Center NRW in Bad Oeynhausen is aimed primarily at chronically ill people. Daily, they send their body values via telecommunication to the institute.
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Hospital construction: infection prevention through architecture?

09.01.2017

Hospitals apply many infection prevention and control measures. They all have one thing in common: they are individual parts of an overall concept that is aimed at preventing the spread of highly infectious and resistant pathogens in hospitals. Nevertheless, previous hygiene concepts ignore one aspect of hospitals: the architecture of the actual hospital facility itself.
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Image: A young girl is lying in the hospital bed, behind her a nurse is adjusting a monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Working with children with cancer – More than just a job

02.01.2017

Our topic title "pediatric (children’s) oncology" evoked strong emotional reactions from several mothers and fathers of our staff. "This hits too close to home for me, I couldn’t write about it", or "How do people manage to deal with this?". And we are only on the sidelines; physicians, caregivers and nurses at the hospital, hospice or families at home are the ones that have the real tough job.
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Image: Boy lies in a hospitalbed and is looking up to a doctor whose hand lies on the boy's shoulder; Copyright: panthermedia.net/spotmatikphoto

"Always be honest" – How to communicate with critically ill children

02.01.2017

When children suffer from a critical or terminal illness, the first impulse of adults is often to not tell the children and sugarcoat the situation. Yet it is just this type of behavior that frequently causes children to emotionally withdraw.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02.01.2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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