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Image: retina layers displayed in a diagram; Copyright: Knowledge Technology Institute, UCM

Retina: areas change in mild Alzheimer's disease

19.09.2019

Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) have identified changes in retinal layer thickness, inflammation or thinning in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, confirming that the retina is one of the most important biomarkers for early diagnosis of the disease.
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Image: Illustration of the three brain regions associated with speech production; Copyright: Northwestern University

fMRI: map of broken brain networks shows why people lose speech

03.09.2019

For the first time, Northwestern Medicine scientists have pinpointed the location of dysfunctional brain networks that lead to impaired sentence production and word finding in primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a form of dementia in which patients often lose their language rather than their memory or thought process.
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Image: woman in a lab coat and disposable gloves choosing a sample from the brain bank; Copyright: UC Davis Health

AI: mapping the brain landscape for Alzheimer's disease

16.08.2019

A team of researchers lead by Brittany Dugger of UC Davis Health has been awarded a $3.8 million grant from the National Institute for Aging (NIA) to help define the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease in Hispanic cohorts.
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Image: illustration of nanodestructive characterization of stem cell differentiation through exosomal miRNA detection; Copyright: Jin-Ho Lee/Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Nanotechnology: better stem cell transplantation research

15.08.2019

Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries.
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Image: PET imaging using the radiotracers FDG and florbetapir for analysis; Copyright: Penn Medicine

Imaging: brain's glucose consumption as a marker

08.08.2019

While the presence of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain may be a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, giving patients an amyloid PET scan is not an effective method for measuring their cognitive function, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Thomas Jefferson University.
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Image: fingers with disposable gloves holding a blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Diagnostics: new blood test for detecting Alzheimer's disease

10.07.2019

Researchers from Lund University have used a method to develop a new blood marker capable of detecting whether or not a person has Alzheimer’s disease. If the method is approved for clinical use, the researchers hope eventually to see it used as a diagnostic tool in primary healthcare. This autumn, they will start a trial in primary healthcare to test the technique.
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Image: hospital behind palm trees; Copyright: Florida Atlantic University

AI could be 'game changer' in detecting and managing Alzheimer's disease

27.06.2019

Worldwide, about 44 million people are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or a related form of dementia. Although 82 percent of seniors in the United States say it's important to have their thinking or memory checked, only 16 percent say they receive regular cognitive assessments.
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Bild: Mann liegt auf dem Boden, vor ihm der mobile Roboter mit Tablet; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

MobiKa – programmed to help

22.05.2019

Many illnesses or old age require help with everyday tasks. Unfortunately, family members or caregivers aren’t always available to lend a hand. The MobiKa mobile service robot is designed to offer support, deliver motivation and improve the quality of life of those in need.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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