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Image: depiction of a cerebral organoid; Copyright: Madeline Lancaster/IMBA

Project "HCA|Organoid": toward a single-cell atlas of human organoids

31/08/2020

HCA|Organoid is a new EU research project that combines single-cell profiling and organoid technology to validate organoids as faithful models of human biology. By creating well-characterized in vitro models of human organs, this resource will enable future discovery-driven and translational research on rare genetic diseases, complex multifactorial diseases, and on cancer.
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Image: A physiotherapist and a physician are doing exercises with a man with a bandage on his knee; Copyright: PantherMedia/photographee.eu

Researchers find way to speed up nerve regrowth for trauma patients

25/08/2020

Electrical stimulation a week before surgery causes nerves to regenerate three to five times faster, leading to better outcomes.
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Image: Liquid CaproGlu gel applied to meat; Copyright: NTU Singapore

"Biorubber" glue for faster surgical recovery and pain relief

21/08/2020

Materials scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have invented a new type of surgical glue that can help join blood vessels and close wounds faster and may also serve as a platform to deliver pain relief drugs.
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Image: burn wound on arm is bandaged; Copyright: PantherMedia/ocskaymark

Wounds: how skin can regenerate after severe burns

20/08/2020

People who suffer severe burns or extensive skin injuries are often left to live with extreme scarring, disfigurement, and skin that feels chronically tight and itchy. That's because the body's healing processes have evolved to focus on preventing infection by quickly closing up wounds, rather than regenerating or restoring normal skin tissue.
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Image: A colored image of a cell putting out long arms; Copyright: Washington University in St. Louis

New insights into wound healing

04/08/2020

When we get a wound on our skin, the cells in our bodies quickly mobilize to repair it. While it has been known how cells heal wounds and how scars form, a team led by researchers from Washington University in St. Louis has determined for the first time how the process begins, which may provide new insight into wound healing, fibrosis and cancer metastasis.
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Image: biofilm of a chronic wound under the microscope; Copyright: University of Huddersfield

Biofilm early detection findings will advance chronic wound care

31/07/2020

Biofilms, microscopic entities not visible by the naked eye, go undetected by health professionals damaging healing tissue and causing delays in wound healing by reducing the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotic, antimicrobial and host immune treatments.
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Image: scan of a broken bone in a leg; Copyright: PantherMedia/plepraisaeng

Rebuilding broken bones with electricity

01/07/2020

Healing broken bones could get easier with a device that provides both a scaffold for the bone to grow on and electrical stimulation to urge it forward, UConn engineers reported on June 27 in the Journal of Nano Energy.
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Image: Images of macrophages; Copyright: Hala Al Khoury / Uni Halle

Special coatings to reduce complications after implant surgery

01/07/2020

New coatings on implants could help make them more compatible. Researchers at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new method of applying anti-inflammatory substances to implants in order to inhibit undesirable inflammatory reactions in the body. Their study was recently published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.
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Image: retinal neuron membrane; Copyright: IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (M. Bramini)

Nanotechnology: first liquid retina prosthesis

30/06/2020

Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia has led to the revolutionary development of an artificial liquid retinal prosthesis to counteract the effects of diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration that cause the progressive degeneration of photoreceptors of the retina, resulting in blindness. The study has been published in Nature Nanotechnology.
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Image: artificial heart valve on a finger; Copyright: Professor Raimondo Ascione, University of Bristol

New heart valve could transform open heart surgery

30/06/2020

A new polymeric heart valve with a life span potentially longer than current artificial valves that would also prevent the need for the millions of patients with diseased heart valves to require life-long blood thinning tablets has been developed by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge. The team’s latest in-vitro results suggest that the PoliValve could last for up to 25 years.
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Image: hand-held LED light; Copyright: UCL

Looking at deep red light improves eyesight

29/06/2020

Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new UCL-led study, the first of its kind in humans. Scientists believe the discovery, published in the Journals of Gerontology, could signal the dawn of new affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision.
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Image: A collage of differently colored microscopic images; Copyright: Images courtesy of the GSK Center for Optical Molecular Imaging

Microscopy technique for noninvasive evaluation of wound healing

26/06/2020

Researchers at the GSK Center for Optical Molecular Imaging have developed a new microscope that looks at the different parameters that change during wound healing. They hope to use this technique to understand how skin disorders, such as foot ulcers in diabetic patients and psoriasis, can be treated.
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Image: A half-transparent red piece of tissue in a glass filled with a yellow fluid; Copyright: United Therapeutics

rhCollagen: genetically engineered building block for regenerative medicine

03/02/2020

Collagen is the stuff that holds our bodies together and that houses our cells. In regenerative medicine, it is also the stuff that can be applied to wounds to support healing. However, collagen from animal or human sources has some drawbacks for today’s medicine. This is where rhCollagen from the Israeli company CollPlant comes into play.
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Image: Computer-generated image of an arborizing blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ugreen

Angiogenesis: light shows blood vessels the way

03/02/2020

Regenerative medicine aims to replace damage in the body with functional tissue and restore normal function. The first defense for large defects are implants made of hydrogels, designed to promote cell growth. They need their own blood supply, which is a problem when it comes to larger implants because you cannot regulate where and how the blood vessels grow - until now.
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Image: Two knees of a woman next to each other, the left knee has a surgical suture; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wujekspeed

Regenerative medicine: creating a new body?

03/02/2020

Regenerative medicine aims to repair the human body after injuries, accidents or major cancer surgery. Unfortunately, we are still not at a stage where this process can achieve optimal results for every conceivable situation. Having said that, various new methods are on the cusp of breakthrough.
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Image: The shoulder of a man with a surgical suture; Copyright: panthermedia.net/JPCPROD

Regenerative medicine: helps the body healing

03/02/2020

Severe wounds heal slowly and leave scars. This is why we have been using regenerative therapies for some time now to accelerate and improve healing. They also help to avoid permanent damage. Still, complex applications like replacing organs or limbs will rather remain vision than become reality for a long time.
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23/09/2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01/07/2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23/07/2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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