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Image: Electronic Skin Device; Copyright: RMIT University

Electronic skin can react to pain like human skin

02/09/2020

Researchers have developed electronic artificial skin that reacts to pain just like real skin, opening the way to better prosthetics, smarter robotics and non-invasive alternatives to skin grafts. The prototype device developed by a team at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, can electronically replicate the way human skin senses pain.
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Image: Three researchers are presenting a black glove; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Researchers develop smart gaming glove with medical uses

27/08/2020

Simply flex your index finger to fire your weapon and rotate your wrist clockwise to move forward. Immersive controls have always been a pipedream in the world of gaming but is steadily becoming reality.
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Image: left the optical tracking system that captures and recreates the movement of the exoskeleton and the human markers in a digital space, right the human doing movements with the exoskeleton; Copy

Exoskeleton research marches forward with study on fit

21/08/2020

A shoddily tailored suit or a shrunken T-shirt may not be the most stylish, but wearing them is unlikely to hurt more than your reputation. An ill-fitting robotic exoskeleton on the battlefield or factory floor, however, could be a much bigger problem than a fashion faux pas.
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Image: wearable sensor applied on the skin like a sticking plaster; Copyright: Robson Rosa da Silva

Wearable sensors analyze substances present in sweat

18/08/2020

A wearable sensor printed on microbial nanocellulose, a natural polymer, has been created in Brazil by researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in São Carlos in collaboration with colleagues at São Paulo State University (UNESP) in Araraquara, the University of Araraquara (UNIARA), the University of Campinas (UNICAMP), and the Brazilian National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano).
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Image: Smartwatch on a wrist; Copyright: Jialun Zhu, Shuyu Lin, and Yichao Zhao (I²BL/UCLA)

Smartwatch tracks medication levels

10/08/2020

Engineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and their colleagues at Stanford School of Medicine have demonstrated that drug levels inside the body can be tracked in real time using a custom smartwatch that analyzes the chemicals found in sweat. This wearable technology could be incorporated into a more personalized approach to medicine.
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Image: Person at the edge of a football field with sensor patch on arm; Copyright: Fraunhofer IZM / Volker Mai

Wearables: sensor patches as fitness trackers

29/07/2020

The Eurostars project XPatch is developing a flexible sensor system that can track biochemical information in real time. The international consortium is working on a new generation of diagnostic patches that monitor the sweat of high performance athletes for second-by-second medical information about their cardiovascular fitness.
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Image: wearable triboelectric nanogenerator; Copyright: Wenzhuo Wu/Purdue University

New option for monitoring heart health

22/07/2020

An invention may turn one of the most widely used materials for biomedical applications into wearable devices to help monitor heart health. A team from Purdue University developed self-powered wearable triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based contact layers for monitoring cardiovascular health.
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Image: man doing sports while wearing a cardiobelt; Copyright: Robert Stürmer / Empa

Wearable membrane for your health

02/07/2020

It is not only in summer that it can get hot during sports activities, because sport during winter also hasits pitfalls. Outside it is freezing cold, and insulating clothing is a must. To ensure that we don’t freeze in our wet clothes during our well-earned breaks, Empa researchers have developed an electro-osmotic membrane, which keeps clothing dry and thus warm.
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Image: man holding his finger to the smartphone camera; Copyright: FibriCheck

Smartphone app detects cardiac arrhythmia

03/03/2020

Atrial fibrillation is one of the causes for a stroke and often appears without any previous indications. To reduce the risks and provide fast results, the application FibriCheck was invented. With the app it is possible to collect and measure data via smartphone camera.
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Image: Man sitting next to an older woman wearing vr glasses on a couch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/draoscondreaw

Sensor-Based Smart Glove Enables Parkinson's Diagnosis

25/02/2020

Neurological disorders like Parkinson's are often diagnosed once the disease has already progressed to a later stage. The VAFES project was initiated to facilitate an early detection. Sensor technology and VR are used in the creation of a playful test system.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02/12/2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Image: two athletes at the startline for a race; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

Sports Hub project changes sports medicine with big data and AI

22/10/2019

Professor Jarek Krajewski sat down for a MEDICA interview and delivered a detailed description of the Sports Hub project. It highlights how big data and AI transform the world of sports medicine. The project delivers new insights and provides a versatile database.
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Image: Woman looks at the image of an injured soccer player on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Sports medicine: preventing injuries with wearable sensors

08/02/2019

The consequences of sports injuries can be very serious and sideline athletes for a long time. Although it often seems like these injuries happen in a split second, they can also be the result of overuse and loads that usually weaken the athlete over time. This stress can be detected and reduced with wearable technology and injuries prevented before they happen.
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Image: preview picture of the video

Intelligent, portable, but also practicable? Wearables and smart textiles tested at MEDICA

13/11/2018

Whether intelligent Smartwatch, a vest that measures heart rate or a pocket-sized allergy test: Wearables and smart Textiles are important health aids, but how practical are they really? We did the test at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: tour of the presser

MEDICA 2018 – where the medicine of tomorrow starts

11/11/2018

It is already a tradition for the trade press to get a first glimpse at the MEDICA highlights at Sunday before MEDICA. Our camera crew has already captured some exciting products that will influence the medicine of tomorrow, so you will not miss out on this.
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