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Image: A man is sleeping in his bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/diego cervo (YAYMicro)

Monitoring sleep positions for a healthy rest

17/09/2020

MIT researchers have developed a wireless, private way to monitor a person's sleep postures - whether snoozing on their back, stomach, or sides - using reflected radio signals from a small device mounted on a bedroom wall.
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Image: 3D image showing a human being and his different muscles, which can be repaired using robotic muscles; Copyright: University of Bristol

Robotic muscles could turn back body clock by 2050

10/09/2020

Loss of strength and muscle wastage is currently an unavoidable part of getting older and has a significant impact on health and quality of life.
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Image: upper body of a man, the portable device is attached to his belt, a tube leads to a patch on his arm; Copyright: Purdue University/Rahim Rahimi

Wearables: treating antibiotic-resistant infections

07/09/2020

The rapid increase of life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infections has resulted in challenging wound complications with limited choices of effective treatments. About 6 million people in the United States are affected by chronic wounds.
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Image: redesigned face mask on a mannequin; Copyright: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech

Face masks: redesign to improve comfort and protection

07/09/2020

Imagine a reusable face mask that protects wearers and those around them from SARS-CoV-2, is comfortable enough to wear all day, and stays in place without frequent adjustment. Based on decades of experience with filtration and textile materials, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have designed a new mask intended to do just that.
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Image: Electronic Skin Device; Copyright: RMIT University

Electronic skin can react to pain like human skin

02/09/2020

Researchers have developed electronic artificial skin that reacts to pain just like real skin, opening the way to better prosthetics, smarter robotics and non-invasive alternatives to skin grafts. The prototype device developed by a team at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, can electronically replicate the way human skin senses pain.
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Image: A young laboratory technician with AR glasses uses a pipette, he is surrounded by different bubbles with text; Copyright: Helbling Technik Wil AG

Augmented Reality for better laboratory results

01/09/2020

Accuracy is paramount in laboratory settings and ensures that lab results are valid. Errors in a lab can render series of tests unusable and waste precious time and money. In the medical realm, this might even result in clinical trial errors. Augmented reality (AR) can help laboratory technicians to prevent errors and guide their work in the future.
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Image: Three researchers are presenting a black glove; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Researchers develop smart gaming glove with medical uses

27/08/2020

Simply flex your index finger to fire your weapon and rotate your wrist clockwise to move forward. Immersive controls have always been a pipedream in the world of gaming but is steadily becoming reality.
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Image: left the optical tracking system that captures and recreates the movement of the exoskeleton and the human markers in a digital space, right the human doing movements with the exoskeleton; Copy

Exoskeleton research marches forward with study on fit

21/08/2020

A shoddily tailored suit or a shrunken T-shirt may not be the most stylish, but wearing them is unlikely to hurt more than your reputation. An ill-fitting robotic exoskeleton on the battlefield or factory floor, however, could be a much bigger problem than a fashion faux pas.
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Image: wearable sensor applied on the skin like a sticking plaster; Copyright: Robson Rosa da Silva

Wearable sensors analyze substances present in sweat

18/08/2020

A wearable sensor printed on microbial nanocellulose, a natural polymer, has been created in Brazil by researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in São Carlos in collaboration with colleagues at São Paulo State University (UNESP) in Araraquara, the University of Araraquara (UNIARA), the University of Campinas (UNICAMP), and the Brazilian National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano).
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Image: Smartwatch on a wrist; Copyright: Jialun Zhu, Shuyu Lin, and Yichao Zhao (I²BL/UCLA)

Smartwatch tracks medication levels

10/08/2020

Engineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and their colleagues at Stanford School of Medicine have demonstrated that drug levels inside the body can be tracked in real time using a custom smartwatch that analyzes the chemicals found in sweat. This wearable technology could be incorporated into a more personalized approach to medicine.
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Image: Person at the edge of a football field with sensor patch on arm; Copyright: Fraunhofer IZM / Volker Mai

Wearables: sensor patches as fitness trackers

29/07/2020

The Eurostars project XPatch is developing a flexible sensor system that can track biochemical information in real time. The international consortium is working on a new generation of diagnostic patches that monitor the sweat of high performance athletes for second-by-second medical information about their cardiovascular fitness.
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Image: wearable triboelectric nanogenerator; Copyright: Wenzhuo Wu/Purdue University

New option for monitoring heart health

22/07/2020

An invention may turn one of the most widely used materials for biomedical applications into wearable devices to help monitor heart health. A team from Purdue University developed self-powered wearable triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based contact layers for monitoring cardiovascular health.
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Image: A woman with a round wearable device around her ear; Copyright: Fraunhofer IDMT/Hannes Kalter

Mobile EEG for the detection of epileptic seizures in daily life

17/07/2020

Epileptic disorders can vary greatly in terms of type, cause and severity. This makes having accurate knowledge of the person’s individual medical condition very important when choosing a custom-fit therapy. To date, physicians have to rely on accounts by the person concerned and those close to them when estimating how often seizures occur.
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Image: sketch of the multi-channel cochlear implant in the ear; Copyright: Prof. Salditt, University of Göttingen

Multi-channel cochlear implants with microscale light-emitting diodes

10/07/2020

A milestone in hearing research: Researchers at the University Medical Center Göttingen and the University of Freiburg combine for the first time gene therapy in the cochlea with optical cochlear implants to optogenetically activate the auditory pathway in gerbils. Published in EMBO Molecular Medicine.
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Image: leaf electrode lying on a book next to tweezers; Copyright: Sven Döring/ Leibniz-IPHT

Electrodes from leaves: efficient, economical and aesthetic

10/07/2020

A research team from Leibniz IPHT in Jena has built electrodes with outstanding optical and electronic properties from leaves. The researchers have coated leaf veins with copper and thus transformed them into electrically conductive and optically transparent electrodes. Designed on the basis of nature, the leaf-structure electrodes could be used to design novel solar cells, LEDs or displays.
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Image: X-ray image of a human chest with the implant at the place of the heart; Copyright: Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology

Active photonic wireless system to power medical implants

08/07/2020

Over the past few decades, medical technology seen various advances in terms of the scope and efficiency of implant devices. Developments in medical research have led to the emergence of electronic implants, such as pacemakers to regulate the heart rate and cerebral spinal shunts to control the flow of spinal fluid. Most of these medical devices require a constant source of energy to operate.
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Image: man doing sports while wearing a cardiobelt; Copyright: Robert Stürmer / Empa

Wearable membrane for your health

02/07/2020

It is not only in summer that it can get hot during sports activities, because sport during winter also hasits pitfalls. Outside it is freezing cold, and insulating clothing is a must. To ensure that we don’t freeze in our wet clothes during our well-earned breaks, Empa researchers have developed an electro-osmotic membrane, which keeps clothing dry and thus warm.
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Image: Three ice hockey players fighting for the puck; Copyright: PantherMedia/fotokvadrat

MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE: how data and AI help sports

16/06/2020

Karl Schwarzenbrunner is the head of the Education and Science Department at the German Ice Hockey Association, and also a speaker at the 8th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE 2020, which will take place this year on 18 and 19 November in Düsseldorf.
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Image: Smiling man is standing in nature with one had at his ear; Copyright: panthermedia.net/cristalov

In-ear sensors for monitoring vital parameters

22/04/2020

Wearables offer practical solutions for the flexible measurement of data. The sensor from cosinuss° is worn directly in the ear and offers a precise monitoring of vital parameters.
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Image: man holding his finger to the smartphone camera; Copyright: FibriCheck

Smartphone app detects cardiac arrhythmia

03/03/2020

Atrial fibrillation is one of the causes for a stroke and often appears without any previous indications. To reduce the risks and provide fast results, the application FibriCheck was invented. With the app it is possible to collect and measure data via smartphone camera.
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Image: Colorful cubes with heart symbols are floating over a smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thodonal

Cardiology: digital solutions support those coping with chronic illness

03/02/2020

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide, taking an estimated 17.9 million lives each year. Acute events such as heart attacks and strokes stand out in this setting. Chronic heart diseases can also be a debilitating condition for many patients. If cardiology uses digital methods and tools, it can reach more affected people.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02/12/2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Image: elderly woman with a tablet on her lap; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Ambient Assisted Living: sensors for seniors

02/12/2019

Our ageing society is confronted with fewer and fewer workers. One of the many consequences is a shortage of skilled nursing staff. Ambient Assisted Living should solve this problem. By equipping the living environment of elderly people or people in need of care with (technical) assistance systems, they are to be given more self-determination and security. The nursing staff also benefits.
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Image: elderly woman in a wheelchair showing a nurse something on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Smart care: safety and support thanks to AAL

02/12/2019

Average life expectancy keeps increasing, while birth rates are declining – at least when it comes to most industrial nations. The coming decades will see a decreasing number of gainfully employed people versus more and more senior citizens and people in need of care. It's a trend that already pushes healthcare to the brink. That's why we desperately need new concepts. One of them is AAL.
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Image: two athletes at the startline for a race; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

Sports Hub project changes sports medicine with big data and AI

22/10/2019

Professor Jarek Krajewski sat down for a MEDICA interview and delivered a detailed description of the Sports Hub project. It highlights how big data and AI transform the world of sports medicine. The project delivers new insights and provides a versatile database.
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Image: A biker is riding on rocky ground in a steppe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Daxiao Productions

Triathlete Sebastian Kienle: wearables and body awareness improve athletic performance

09/09/2019

A 2.4-mile (3.86 km) swim, a 112-mile (180.25 km) bicycle ride and a marathon 26.22-mile (42.20 km) run – that’s the Ironman Triathlon. Triathletes like Sebastian Kienle are constantly working to push beyond their limits. At the 7th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE on November 20 - 21, you can meet Kienle in person.
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Image: A physician wearing VR glasses. An image of the human heart floats in front of him in the air; Copyright: apoQlar

Virtual Surgical Intelligence: Microsoft Hololens in the OR

22/07/2019

Modern imaging opens news doors to surgeries. Yet it also poses major problems for surgeons: They use two-dimensional images to navigate through a three-dimensional surgical environment, while they continuously have to switch their focus back and forth between the images and the patient. Now help is on the way in the form of interactive 3D projections and mixed reality (MR).
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03/06/2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03/06/2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03/06/2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: A hospital room with different monitors and medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Christopher Boswell

Hospital cybersecurity: secure technology and trained employees go hand in hand

02/05/2019

When it comes to IT, the medical sector has a dilemma: On the one hand, digitization and networks are designed to save both time and money. Yet on the other hand, medical systems, physician offices, and hospital networks don’t have nearly the same levels of protection as online stores, payment service providers or financial institutions. That’s also partially due to an absence of risk awareness.
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Image: A male and a female physician look at a tablet together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Cybersecurity in the hospital: securely networked

02/05/2019

Digitalization and networking are supposed to serve the health care system well: In times of staff shortages and demographic change, they are able to support the exchange of patient data and the management of chronic diseases as well as to improve the workflow. But it is still often ignored that both individual devices and complete networks can become lucrative targets for cybercrimes.
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Image: Woman looks at the image of an injured soccer player on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Sports medicine: preventing injuries with wearable sensors

08/02/2019

The consequences of sports injuries can be very serious and sideline athletes for a long time. Although it often seems like these injuries happen in a split second, they can also be the result of overuse and loads that usually weaken the athlete over time. This stress can be detected and reduced with wearable technology and injuries prevented before they happen.
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Image: Physician attaches electrodes to the upper back of a young woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/microgen

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: pain relief with electricity

03/12/2018

According to estimates, every third person in the world suffers from chronic pain. The most common discomforts include back pain, headaches, and nerve pain. For many sufferers, the pain is so severe that it impacts their job, social life or mind. The pain has its own clinical significance and must be treated – with electric current for example.
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Image: preview picture of the video

Intelligent, portable, but also practicable? Wearables and smart textiles tested at MEDICA

13/11/2018

Whether intelligent Smartwatch, a vest that measures heart rate or a pocket-sized allergy test: Wearables and smart Textiles are important health aids, but how practical are they really? We did the test at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: Silhouette of a woman walking up a staircase by the sea; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Exercise Prescription for Health: sports instead of pills

08/10/2018

Did you know that we can influence up to 50 percent of our health ourselves? If we eat a balanced diet and exercise regularly, this not only ensures longer independence in old age. Diseases can also be treated with exercise. But in many cases, physicians and patients still rely more on medication than on exercise.
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Image: Small, black, oval device with a sensor for fingerprints; Copyright: NuvoAir AB

Air Next: sharing spirometry data for better treatment

24/09/2018

Some diseases require close, permanent control of the patient, especially if they are chronic and, if unchecked, potentially dangerous, like some lung diseases. Monitoring them is quite cumbersome, because patients regularly need to visit their physician or a hospital. Wireless devices for home measurements offer at least some comfort and relieve to patients.
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Image: Female hospital employee with green OR cap is wearing AR glasses, a screen is floating in front of her; Copyright: IT4process GmbH

Augmented Reality: supporting sterile processing services?

08/06/2018

Every day, hospital staff has to manage complex processes to guarantee quality and patient safety. Yet in some areas, the use of checklists and manuals tends to be more cumbersome and not useful – as is the case in sterile processing. A new project studies how augmented reality can take all the necessary information into the staff's field of view.
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Image: A woman is looking at her smartphone in bed. She looks tired and exhausted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/leungchopan

The STEADY project: Managing depression with wearables

01/06/2018

These days, smartphones and wearables of all kinds more or less "incidentally" collect lots of personal data about our lives. Many people have privacy and security concerns – and rightfully so – especially if mountains of data fall into the wrong hands. But what if patients collect their own data and get help to use it for their own purposes?
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Image: Man with mobile phone sitting on the floor in front of a sofa; Copyright: panthermedia.net/yacobchuk1

From data to diagnosis – digital help for depression

01/06/2018

Few diseases are as difficult to diagnose as depression. What's more, outsiders often don't perceive it as a disease. The reason for this are symptoms that are not directly visible. Sufferers of the disease tend to experience fear, worry, and despair in everyday life, when no doctor is present. This is the starting point for telemedicine tools such as online programs or smartphone apps.
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Image: Woman is standing on a 3D scanner that measures her feet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/roman023

Biomechanical measuring systems: Versatile tools for many disciplines

02/05/2018

When human movements are no longer as smooth as they should be – due to misalignments or as the result of an injury for example – biomechanical measuring systems spring into action. Thanks to different types of sensors and optical technologies, physicians, therapists, and sports scientists embark on a search for possible causes and corrective options.
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