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Image: retina layers displayed in a diagram; Copyright: Knowledge Technology Institute, UCM

Retina: areas change in mild Alzheimer's disease

19.09.2019

Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) have identified changes in retinal layer thickness, inflammation or thinning in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, confirming that the retina is one of the most important biomarkers for early diagnosis of the disease.
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Image: three images of a crowded gym, two of them with information about the people's exercises; Copyright: Carnegie Mellon University

Sports medicine: GymCam tracks exercises that wearable monitors can't

17.09.2019

Wearable sensors such as smartwatches have become a popular motivational tool for fitness enthusiasts, but gadgets do not sense all exercises equally. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have found that a stationary camera is a better choice for gym exercises.
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Image: purple microscope image of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck; Copyright: Jurmeister/Charité

Machine Learning: improving the diagnosis of head and neck cancers

16.09.2019

Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the German Cancer Consortium have successfully solved a longstanding problem in the diagnosis of head and neck cancers. Working alongside colleagues from TU Berlin, the researchers used artificial intelligence to develop a new classification method which identifies the primary origins of cancerous tissue based on chemical DNA changes.
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Image: tablet in the hands of a medical person; Copyright: panthermedia.net/billiondigital

mHealth: app assessment for multiple sclerosis

10.09.2019

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have developed and validated a tablet-based app that offers a faster, easier and more accurate way for health care providers who don't have specialized training to assess the cognitive function of people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
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Image: someone taking measurements with Photomedas of a skull via smartphone; Copyright: RUVID

mHealth: measuring cranial deformation with a mobile phone

05.09.2019

Photomedas. This is the name of a non-invasive system that will help measure the cranial deformation of infants – from newborns, to 12-month-old babies. It is comprised of a mobile phone application and a mesh cap, and has been developed by Valencia Polytechnic University (UPV) researchers together with La Fe hospital specialists.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02.09.2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: graphic that describes the workflow of Radiomics Analysis for IHC Indicators; Copyright: American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

AI: radiomics model to predict thyroid nodules

02.09.2019

Machine learning models can be trained to extract immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics from the CT scans of patients with suspected thyroid nodules, and these IHC characteristics can then be utilized to significantly improve thyroid nodule diagnoses.
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Image: This is a mimetic diagram of artificial pain generation based on signal processing through a sense of touch

Sensors: electronic skin technology for AI development

02.09.2019

DGIST announced on Wednesday, August 21 that Professor Jae Eun Jang's team in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering developed electronic skin technology that can detect "prick" and "hot" pain sensations like humans. This research result is expected to be applied on the development of humanoid robots and patients wearing prosthetic hands in the future.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02.09.2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02.09.2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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 Image: reasearcher in laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Islet-on-a-chip: miniature device for diabetes research

30.08.2019

In a study led by Harvard University's Kevin Kit Parker, microfluidics and human, insulin-producing beta cells have been integrated in an "Islet-on-a-Chip". The new device makes it easier for scientists to screen insulin-producing cells before transplanting them into a patient, test insulin-stimulating compounds, and study the fundamental biology of diabetes.
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Image: Displacement comparison at the end-systolic frame and final frame; Copyright: WMG University of Warwick

Imaging: new MRI technique spots scar heart muscles

30.08.2019

Traditional MRI scans use the metal gadolinium, which resonates areas of the heart muscles that are not functioning efficiently, however gadolinium affect the Kidney function. The new 3D MRI computing technique calculates strain in heart muscles showing which muscles are not functioning enough without damaging other organs - researchers at WMG, University of Warwick have found.
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Image: DNA strand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Analyzing systems: technique stores cellular 'memory' in DNA

29.08.2019

Engineers program human and bacterial cells to keep a record of complex molecular events. Using a technique that can precisely edit DNA bases, MIT researchers have created a way to store complex "memories" in the DNA of living cells, including human cells.
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Image: intelligent industrial robots under tuning in the laboratory; Copyright: FEFU press office

Robotics: software for diagnostics and fail-safe operation

23.08.2019

A team of scientists from School of Engineering at Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Automation and Control Processes, and Institute of Marine Technology Problems of the Far Eastern Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences developed a software module to automatically diagnose defects in sensors and electric drives in various kinds of robots.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22.08.2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: wearable placed on the forehead of a man; Copyright: Bizen Maskey, Sunchon National University

Wearables: sensors detect what's in your sweat

21.08.2019

New easy-to-make sensors can provide real-time measurements of sweat rate and electrolytes and metabolites in perspiration. Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat.
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Image: stretchable sticker for the skin; Copyright: Bao lab

Wearables: wireless sensors that stick to the skin to track our health

20.08.2019

Skin-hugging sensors track health indicators and use a novel type of RFID to beam signals to receivers clipped to clothing. We tend to take our skin's protective function for granted, ignoring its other roles in signaling subtleties like a fluttering heart or a flush of embarrassment.
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Sports medicine: Neuromuscular training for optimal performance

20.08.2019

Movement, strength and coordination - after injuries as well as in healthy athletes, these three components must be intact for movements to run smoothly. At the Beta Klinik in Bonn, Dr. Markus Klingenberg, a specialist in orthopaedics, trauma surgery and sports medicine, offers neuromuscular training with a playful character that can be adapted to the patient's needs.
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Training partner robot – This is the rehabilitation of the future

16.08.2019

In medicine, robots are already taking over tasks that only a few years ago were exclusively in human hands. Especially in the field of rehabilitation, they will play a major role in the future. In the "RoSylerNT" project of the German Sport University Cologne, a robot arm from KUKA is being used here for training purposes. Find out why a robot is the right training partner!
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Image: woman in a lab coat and disposable gloves choosing a sample from the brain bank; Copyright: UC Davis Health

AI: mapping the brain landscape for Alzheimer's disease

16.08.2019

A team of researchers lead by Brittany Dugger of UC Davis Health has been awarded a $3.8 million grant from the National Institute for Aging (NIA) to help define the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease in Hispanic cohorts.
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Image: colorful figure showing an important part of the protein with contact pairs; Copyright: Ines Reinartz, KIT

AI: predicting the protein structure

15.08.2019

Proteins are biological high-performance machines. They can be found in every cell and play an important role in human blood coagulation or as main constituents of hairs or muscles. The function of these molecular tools is obvious from their structure.
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Image: pregnant woman with a smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Wearables: motion sensors could save unborn babies

14.08.2019

The thump, thump of a baby's heartbeat is a milestone in any pregnancy. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a technique that could allow expectant parents to hear their baby's heartbeat continuously at home with a non-invasive and safe device that is potentially more accurate than any fetal heartrate monitor currently available in the market.
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Image: Woman wearing a blue shirt uses smart textiles; Copyright: Ramses Martinez/Purdue University

Wearables: turning away bacteria with your clothes

08.08.2019

New rainproof, stainproof technology turns clothing into self-powered remotes. A new addition to your wardrobe may soon help you turn on the lights and music - while also keeping you fresh, dry, fashionable, clean and safe from the latest virus that's going around.
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Image: blood samples on a sheet of paper; Copyright: panthermedia.net/belchonock

mHealth: blood pressure monitoring like taking a video selfie

07.08.2019

Blood pressure monitoring might one day become as easy as taking a video selfie, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal. Transdermal optical imaging measures blood pressure by detecting blood flow changes in smartphone-captured facial videos.
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Image:  bone tissue replicated with 3D technology; Copyright: panthermedia.net/eranicle

Regenerative medicine: 'Bone in a dish'

07.08.2019

Like real bone, the material developed at Oregon Health & Science University has a 3D mineral structure populated with living cells, providing a unique model to study bone function, diseases, regeneration.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01.08.2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: graphic oft he computer software AUSPEX; Copyright: SCIGRAPHIX

Software: better determination for macromolecular structures

25.07.2019

The structures of proteins, RNA and DNA are the key to our understanding of life. These structures are measured with X-ray or neutron diffraction, but the data are rarely perfect. Researchers at the University of Würzburg are now developing a new software to analyse this data.
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Image: doctor with pills in hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/leolintang

Two new algorithms identify patients at risk of HIV

22.07.2019

Two new studies developed algorithms that can identify patients who are at risk of acquiring HIV and may benefit from preventive care.
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Image: A physician wearing VR glasses. An image of the human heart floats in front of him in the air; Copyright: apoQlar

Virtual Surgical Intelligence: Microsoft Hololens in the OR

22.07.2019

Modern imaging opens news doors to surgeries. Yet it also poses major problems for surgeons: They use two-dimensional images to navigate through a three-dimensional surgical environment, while they continuously have to switch their focus back and forth between the images and the patient. Now help is on the way in the form of interactive 3D projections and mixed reality (MR).
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Image: A doctor and a white robot are shaking hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Building trust: white paper for the certification of AI

19.07.2019

Digital technology is an intrinsic part of almost every area of life. How can we ensure that developments in this field, especially those that rely on artificial intelligence (AI), meet all our ethical, legal and technological concerns?
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Image: Two men in the zoo holding turtles in their hands; Copyright: Oliver Dietze

Diagnostics: Animal blood samples help predict human diseases

17.07.2019

Penguins, Asian elephants and many other animal species live in the zoos of Saarbrücken and Neunkirchen. As they come from different continents, blood is regularly taken from the animals to check their health.
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Image: stethoscope and smartphone with lungs on the display lying on a table; Copyright: panthermedia.net/belchonock

mHealth: your mobile phone can reveal if you are suffering from respiratory disease

11.07.2019

Signal researchers have developed a mobile phone app that can measure impaired breathing. The results can lead you to determine whether you have a respiratory disease. In the future, this invention can also help people suffering from asthma or allergies with remote care and self-care. The mobile measurement tool is an easy, fast and cost-effective alternative to expensive hospital examinations.
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Image: man trains medical assistants in India in smartphone-based funduscopy; Copyright: University Hospital Bonn

mHealth: smartphones as ophthalmoscopes save sight

10.07.2019

About one in ten people in southern India is diabetic. Around one in three suffers from a so-called diabetic retinopathy (DR), a disease of the retina caused by diabetes. Untreated, DR is often the cause of visual impairment and blindness. However, many of those affected have symptoms only in the late stages of the disease.
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Image: imCMS model; Copyright: University of Zurich

AI: molecular tumor classification and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer

09.07.2019

Treating physicians need information about the molecular subtype of the tumor if they are to provide targeted therapy for colorectal carcinoma. A research team from University Hospital Zurich and the University of Oxford have now developed a method to predict the molecular classification of colorectal cancer from digital pathology slides.
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Image: prosthetic hand and socket; Copyright: Hiroshima University Biological Systems Engineering Lab

Prosthetic hand: 3D printed and combinable with a computer interface

08.07.2019

Losing a limb, either through illness or accident, can present emotional and physical challenges for an amputee, damaging their quality of life. Prosthetic limbs can be very useful but are often expensive and difficult to use.
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 Image: researchers on a laptop; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness Images

Cybersecurity: Software uncovers vulnerability

05.07.2019

Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories identified the weakness and notified the software developers. The issue has also been fixed in the latest release of the software. While no attack from this vulnerability is known, the National Institutes of Standards and Technology recently described it in a note to software developers, genomics researchers and network administrators.
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Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01.07.2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
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Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01.07.2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: Image of the PCC Game app; Copyright: Elin Lindström Claessen

Game app provides knowledge of person-centred care

28.06.2019

Click, swipe, listen to patients and follow the talk among the healthcare staff. Now, another step in the work towards a more person-centred care is being taken as the PCC Game app is being launched. A virtual journey for greater knowledge and with tricky questions along the way.
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Image: Detailed video-based recording of the movement of all finger joints of a hand when gripping an object; Copyright: Swathi Sheshadri

AI: recognizing pathological movement patterns

28.06.2019

Reliably evaluating walking and gripping movements of patients is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of movement disorders, for example after a stroke or in Parkinson's syndromes. However, the success of this challenging diagnostic procedure depends to a large extent on the experience and skills of the attending physician.
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Image: hospital behind palm trees; Copyright: Florida Atlantic University

AI could be 'game changer' in detecting and managing Alzheimer's disease

27.06.2019

Worldwide, about 44 million people are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or a related form of dementia. Although 82 percent of seniors in the United States say it's important to have their thinking or memory checked, only 16 percent say they receive regular cognitive assessments.
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Image: sample testing contraption, to be paired with a smartphone, compared against a 96-well plate; Copyright: SFU

mHealth: smartphone solution for diagnostic testing in remote rural areas

27.06.2019

Zhendong Cao is hoping to help women in rural areas access information about their reproductive health using a common tool in their pockets: a smartphone. He has developed a unique way to take advantage of a smartphone's camera so that it could help perform non-clinical diagnostic testing, with initial applications that can help women with family planning and reproductive health monitoring.
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Image: physician examinates a patient with the portable device by holding the device and a smartphone in front of the patient's eye; Copyright: Phelcom Technologies

mHealth: portable device can be used to diagnose eye disease remotely

26.06.2019

A portable device connected to a smartphone makes precise images of the retina to detect back-of-the-eye (fundus) disease at a far lower cost than conventional methods. Created by Phelcom Technologies, a startup based at São Carlos in São Paulo State, Brazil, the Eyer can be used for remote diagnosis by an ophthalmologist via telemedicine.
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24.06.2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Image: black box - new device for rapid cancer diagnosis during surgery; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Optical method: compact device for rapid tissue analysis during surgery

24.06.2019

A team of researchers from Jena is presenting a groundbreaking new method for the rapid, gentle and reliable detection of tumors with laser light. For the first time, the Leibniz IPHT will present a compact device for rapid cancer diagnosis during surgery. The optical method will help surgeons to remove tumors more precisely and could make cancer operations possible without a scalpel.
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Image: Sketch-like representation of the Big Data concept - all data is transferred to a central server via a funnel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Faithie

Open data: making science more verifiable

24.06.2019

The unrestricted availability of original data – so-called open data – on scientific publications is an important prerequisite for ensuring research results are verifiable and able to be used in the best possible way. Moreover, the reproducibility of results is crucial for the transfer of research findings into commercial or social application – which is the main concern of the BIH.
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Functional Imaging: The puls of modern oncology

17.06.2019

Medical imaging techniques have developed considerably in recent decades. In addition to morphological imaging techniques more and more functional imaging techniques are used in oncology that can continously record the functions of specific organs locally and regionally in real time. These are groundbreaking for diagnostics, therapies and preoperative preparations.
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03.06.2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: Boy uses robot arm in front of a monitor with computer game, next to it stands the therapist; Copyright: Helios Klinik Hattingen

Rehab with a robot – robot-assisted therapy in neurology

03.06.2019

It takes consistent repetitions if rehab patients want to relearn skills after surviving a stroke. This requires extreme effort. The industrial sector uses robots to perform repetitive tasks or handle jobs that require strength. What has been a fixture in factories for decades is now also making its way into rehabilitation facilities.
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Bild: Mann liegt auf dem Boden, vor ihm der mobile Roboter mit Tablet; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

MobiKa – programmed to help

22.05.2019

Many illnesses or old age require help with everyday tasks. Unfortunately, family members or caregivers aren’t always available to lend a hand. The MobiKa mobile service robot is designed to offer support, deliver motivation and improve the quality of life of those in need.
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Image: A male and a female physician look at a tablet together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Cybersecurity in the hospital: securely networked

02.05.2019

Digitalization and networking are supposed to serve the health care system well: In times of staff shortages and demographic change, they are able to support the exchange of patient data and the management of chronic diseases as well as to improve the workflow. But it is still often ignored that both individual devices and complete networks can become lucrative targets for cybercrimes.
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Image: Hands in front of a computer and tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrew Lozovyi

Human firewall – keeping your resources safe

02.05.2019

Digitization impacts many areas of life. It is also remapping the healthcare landscape and is becoming increasingly important, ensuring that patients receive comprehensive care as quickly as possible. To make this a reality, data is stored digitally and medical devices are connected.
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Image: View of laptop screen with message that data was encrypted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Security first – hospitals prime targets of cyberattacks

02.05.2019

Safety should be a top priority when it comes to safeguarding human lives. That's why hospitals must protect their computer networks and data against unauthorized access. However, thanks to the proliferation of connected devices in hospitals, they are at high risk of suffering devastating cyberattacks. There is also a lack of cybersecurity awareness.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23.04.2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: Woman looks at the image of an injured soccer player on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Sports medicine: preventing injuries with wearable sensors

08.02.2019

The consequences of sports injuries can be very serious and sideline athletes for a long time. Although it often seems like these injuries happen in a split second, they can also be the result of overuse and loads that usually weaken the athlete over time. This stress can be detected and reduced with wearable technology and injuries prevented before they happen.
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Hybrid Imaging – Two Views of the Lungs

25.01.2019

CT scan, MRI or X-ray: All these methods allow doctors to see inside the body - including inside the lungs - and make a diagnosis. The clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the RWTH Aachen University Hospital uses a state-of-the-art gamma camera that combines SPECT and CT.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02.01.2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19.12.2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21.11.2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Interview with Verso Vision

15.11.2018

Artificial intelligence and algorithms that become ever more complex are increasingly used in devices in the hospital. This does not only bring speed, but also safety to the treatment and care of patients. We learn more at the stand of Verso Vision at MEDICA 2018.
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Good connectivity, good care - Interview with proxomed Medizintechnik GmbH

15.11.2018

After accidents or surgery, a good rehabilitation is indispensable for patients. This is true all around the world. We learn more about the international rehabilitation market here at the stand of proxomed at MEDICA 2018.
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Surglasses: surgery with perspective: Interview with Taiwan Main Orthopedics

15.11.2018

Surgeons need a good overview of what they are doing. This is especially true for minimally-invasive surgery, since they cannot see the operating area directly. Using augmented reality, Taiwan Main Orthopedics Biotechnology helps surgeons to retain their perspective, even during complex interventions.
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Interview with KUKA Deutschland GmbH

15.11.2018

Man and machine have been working hand in hand for years. KUKA GmbH offers industrial robots in many variants. At MEDICA 2018, it presents the KUKA MED lightweight robot, which is to be used in medicine in the future.
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Typing with TiPY – Interview with the Drory Handels GmbH

14.11.2018

Whether with or without disability, one-handed typing could make our work more efficient. You can't imagining this on a standard keyboard? The developer of TiPY can't do too. But in the interview at MEDICA 2018 he gives the answer how it could work in the future.
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Patient care of the future? Robotics, AI and Big Data at MEDICA 2018

14.11.2018

Robotics, artificial intelligence, big data: these are terms that were not used in connection with medicine a few years ago. Today they are no longer dreams of the future, but an important support in diagnosis, during surgery or aftercare. Find out more at MEDICA 2018!
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Intelligent, portable, but also practicable? Wearables and smart textiles tested at MEDICA

13.11.2018

Whether intelligent Smartwatch, a vest that measures heart rate or a pocket-sized allergy test: Wearables and smart Textiles are important health aids, but how practical are they really? We did the test at MEDICA 2018.
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Healthcare data to go – Interview with medicus.ai

13.11.2018

New technologies lead to new challenges, but also open up new possibilities. At the stand of Medicus AI at MEDICA 2018, we will find out what they look like specifically for medicine. The company has developed an app that bundles all of a patient's health-related data and helps understand medical reports.
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Image: One presses on screen with security key; Copyright: panthermedia.net/welcomia

Digitization: Hospitals as Popular Targets?

02.11.2018

It’s safe to say that patients and their prompt medical care take center stage at any hospital. Digitization of the healthcare sector is quickly advancing to make this a reality: data is stored in a digital medium, devices are linked together. But how safe are hospitals in the age of innovation?
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Image: graphical steps of lung segmentation; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus/A. Braune

Lung segmentation: easier and faster thanks to new algorithms

01.10.2018

A look inside the lungs is a time-consuming process. To identify the boundaries of the respiratory organ from surrounding other organs, tissues, and structures requires between 200 and 500 computed tomographic images and subsequent manual markings – an elaborate process that can take up to six hours. An optimized computer program is now able to do this in only a few seconds.
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Image: for better care: the electronic patient file; Copyright: panthermedia.net/hasloo

Electronic Health Record: Transparent Patient?

21.09.2018

A smart hospital has many components, which ultimately come together as a connected whole, thus achieving better patient care. One crucial piece of the puzzle that some countries like the U.S. have implemented but one that’s still missing in Germany is the electronic health record (or electronic medical record). It is shrouded in controversy and yet a critical aspect of the hospital of the future.
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Image: View over the shoulder of a person with a tablet in his hand, showing the operating theatre in front of him with screens and devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Master plan Smart Hospital: well-connected is half cared for

03.09.2018

Artificial intelligence makes the diagnosis, robots perform the surgery and physicians manage all processes via touchscreen – is that what hospitals of the future will look like? And how far away are we actually from this future? Many hospital facilities are already on their way to becoming Smart Hospitals with the latest technology and where everything and everyone is linked and connected.
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Image: Two physicians are looking at a model of a vascular system through 3D glasses; Copyright: Brainlab AG

Smart Hospital: How devices communicate in the OR

03.09.2018

In a Smart Hospital, all devices are designed to be connected and integrated, thus increasing efficiency and reducing time loss – at least, that is how things are meant to work in theory. In reality, there are still countless vendor-specific point solutions that cannot be integrated. That's why there is a need for solutions that bridge the gap between the different applications and formats.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22.08.2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: A man is working at a computer that shows a model of the human liver; Copyright: Fraunhofer MEVIS

AI in medicine: Machines do not learn like humans

01.08.2018

For years, medicine has been exploring AI techniques aimed at easing physician workload. While computers may not have the medical expertise and skills obtained through years of study, they can recognize patterns and specific features in datasets and draw deductions.
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Image: Computer generated model of a human body, consisting of a white grid; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kheng Ho Toh

Diagnosing diseases with big data

01.08.2018

All of us generate data every day without even realizing it – sometimes it happens unconsciously and unintentionally. At this point, we are made of data and not just in the eyes of tech companies but also from a healthcare system perspective. Our electronic health records are a smorgasbord of data for example.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23.07.2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: Female hospital employee with green OR cap is wearing AR glasses, a screen is floating in front of her; Copyright: IT4process GmbH

Augmented Reality: supporting sterile processing services?

08.06.2018

Every day, hospital staff has to manage complex processes to guarantee quality and patient safety. Yet in some areas, the use of checklists and manuals tends to be more cumbersome and not useful – as is the case in sterile processing. A new project studies how augmented reality can take all the necessary information into the staff's field of view.
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Image: Man with mobile phone sitting on the floor in front of a sofa; Copyright: panthermedia.net/yacobchuk1

From data to diagnosis – digital help for depression

01.06.2018

Few diseases are as difficult to diagnose as depression. What's more, outsiders often don't perceive it as a disease. The reason for this are symptoms that are not directly visible. Sufferers of the disease tend to experience fear, worry, and despair in everyday life, when no doctor is present. This is the starting point for telemedicine tools such as online programs or smartphone apps.
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Hospital logistics – Digitization meets manual labor

16.04.2018

Countless items and products have to get to the right destination in a hospital every day. A complex process runs behind all this, where nothing works without digitization. Still, it also involves a good amount of manual labor. We went behind the scenes to see how hospital logistics work at the University Hospital Knappschaftskrankenhaus in Bochum and the Buttkereit Company in Dortmund.
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Image: young woman with VR-glasses in the VR-Lab, in front of it a young man at a computer, on which a virtual heart can be seen; Copyright: Kompetenzzentrum eLearning in der Medizin Baden-Württemberg

VR Lab for medical students: linking theory and practice

22.03.2018

Virtual reality and medicine are increasingly mentioned in the same context. In addition to the development of applications that support the treatment of patients suffering from chronic pain and anxiety, this technology also benefits medical staff. Two months ago, the Ulm University Hospital has opened the VR Lab, where medical students can train and learn with the help of 3D organs.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08.03.2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: hospital warehouse; Copyright: panthermedia.net/.shock

Hospital logistics: guarantor of quality and efficiency

01.02.2018

Medical supply distribution, supplying operating rooms with sterile instrument kits, the provision of food and catering services for patients – these are some of the around-the-clock care processes at a hospital. Efficient logistics are crucial to guarantee smooth processes. All of these pieces ultimately come together at the hospital’s in-house logistics center.
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01.02.2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Image: OR nurse is standing in front of a screen and holds surgical pincers in her hand; Copyright: ASANUS Medizintechnik GmbH

Eye on material flow: network solutions for hospital logistics

01.02.2018

Hospitals need an accurate assessment of the location and quantity of their materials to eliminate sources of error. Automated processes can also help employees to make these materials available at the right time and at the right place. Digital network systems will substantially support the logistics in the hospital of the future.
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Image: one of Fiagon's electromagnetic surgical navigation systems; Copyright: Fiagon

The surgeon's co-pilot: pin-point accuracy through electromagnetic navigation systems

04.01.2018

The position and alignment of surgical tools in the patient’s body must always be kept in view during the operation process to guarantee success and safety. With fine sensors at the tip of the instruments and an electromagnetic signal, Fiagon's electromagnetic navigation systems accurately reproduce their position in the body.
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Image: OR with very modern equipment; Copyright; Swen Reichhold

OR of the future: Surgical navigation systems and integrated devices

04.01.2018

While it is commonplace for operating room staff to work together as a team, the collaboration of operating room systems does not always work so well – many devices are still separated from one another, causing the OR processes to be prone to mistakes. The same applies to surgical navigation technologies that represent the interface between imaging, the surgeon and therapeutic devices.
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Image: Doctor with a laptop, around him various medical images, behind him an ECG; Copyright: panthermedia.net/realinemedia

Surgical navigation systems: Safely guiding the scalpel

04.01.2018

Imaging, navigation, integration – these are terms that describe the modern operating room. All of these components play a key role in accurate surgical procedures. They are integrated into surgical navigation systems, which make complicated medical surgeries considerably safer.
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Image: Computer keyboard where one key has been replaced by the CE symbol with the flag of the EU; Copyright: panthermedia.net/NiroDesign

When is a medical device considered to be a medical device? – Certification, norms, and standards

01.12.2017

To ensure product quality and patient safety, medical devices must meet specific requirements outlined in the Medical Devices Act and specified EU directives. Yet which norms and standards must actually be met and how is this verified?
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Image: A hand touches a smartphone camera that is measuring the heart rate with an app; Copyright: Preventicus GmbH

"Preventicus Heartbeats": An app that's a clinically validated medical device

01.12.2017

Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Yet many incidences of stroke are preventable since they are frequently associated with an undetected abnormal heart rhythm. In this case, patients can benefit from using the clinically validated "Preventicus Heartbeats" app, which measures and documents the heart rhythm with a smartphone camera.
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Image: forearm bone which is scanned in the ultrasound hand scanner; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Using ultrasound for verification: proof of legal age via handheld scanner

22.11.2017

Human trafficking is a global crime that often preys on underage persons and forces them into prostitution and forced labor. In most cases, people are smuggled across borders with fake passports. Scientists at the Fraunhofer IBMT have now developed a non-invasive, handheld smartphone-compatible scanner that uses ultrasound to determine whether a person has reached full legal age.
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Serious Games - getting healthy while playing games

14.11.2017

Gaming is an activity that children as well as adults enjoy. They are fun and challenge our stamina. That’s why serious games are increasingly becoming popluar in physiotherapy and rehabilitation. MEDICA 2017 demonstrates already what applications are available here.
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MEDICA 2017: Cutting-edge, look into the future

13.11.2017

For exhibitors and visitors, MEDICA 2017 does not start until Monday. However, the trade press already gets a preview of some selected product highlights on the Sunday before the trade fair. We were there with the camera and met with some exhibitors. They gave us the opportunity to present cutting-edge products and to take a look at the medical technology of the future.
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Image: A man is standing outdoors while typing on his smart watch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/guniamc

mHealth: how mobile choices can successfully reach users

02.10.2017

mHealth has been slated to revolutionize the healthcare market for the past few years. Yet things are not quite as easy for apps and wearables as it may seem. A recently conducted study reveals that there are still many obstacles to overcome before manufacturers and health professionals can connect with patients and their mobile devices.
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Image: Man who is blowing into a smartphone adapter for breath tests; Copyright: THM/Gross/Sohrabi

AST@home: A rapid respiratory test for COPD using the smartphone

02.10.2017

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often requires a detailed documentation of the course. As part of the AST@home project, Professor Keywan Sohrabi and Professor Volker Groß at the THM developed an app that enables the monitoring of the course of COPD via smartphone and includes family members or nursing staff.
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Image: A large stone is blocking a path that leads through a green meadow; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brigitte Götz

Medical devices: the road to the finished product is not easy

08.09.2017

These days, many groups make various demands of medical device developers: manufacturers, users, patients and government agencies. Given all of these interests and concerns, the developers face many challenges. In this interview, we put some of them under the microscope and examine how they can be sidestepped or entirely avoided.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08.08.2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: Two elderly are sitting beside each other, looking on a screen, where a bingo game can be seen. One woman is standing up; Copyright: SilverFit, Robert ten Berge

SilverFit – Training and gaming for the elderly

01.06.2017

Movement is good for health, but people do it less and less as they age. The Dutch company SilverFit wants to counteract this. Their devices that combine sport and game are primarily aimed at elderly people. Their goal: to give people joy, fun and motivation to move – both in rehabilitation and in daily life.
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Image: Compass pointing towards the word creativity. In the compass’s center is a ball that shows the Indian flag; Copyright: panthermedia.net/eabff

Technology: India offers potential for research and development

02.05.2017

When it comes to the production and development of tech products, many people immediately think of Germany, Japan, the U.S. or Taiwan. What’s often unknown is that an emerging market like India also offers great potential. After all, the country has a large number of experts and just as much technical knowledge at its disposal.
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Image: A monitor and different displays in the OR, behind this the OR team; Copyright: panthermedia.net/chanawit

Smart versus big: how data can assist in the OR

01.03.2017

The OR is the centerpiece of every hospital and also the most expensive resource that should be used efficiently. Yet in reality, there are often delays when interventions are not intelligently scheduled and take place back-to-back. This is why the InnOPlan Research Consortium wants to make surgical device data usable and useful to improve the operating room planning process.
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Image: Surgeon is working at a simulator of the human back with two instruments; Copyright: HTWK Leipzig/Rebecca Schweier

RealSpine: realistic surgical simulation

22.02.2017

Surgeons need a great sense of touch. They first have to acquire this skill in simulation training before they can perform surgery on actual patients. Having said that, simulators are not just meant to teach the right movements; ideally, they should also provide a true-to-life experience of the surgical field – as is the case in RealSpine surgical training.
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