Interviews 2020 -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: An app on a smartphone shows how the deep learning tool identifies diseases via the eye; Copyright: Sharma et al.

Sharma et al.

Deep learning model helps automated screening of common eye disorders

30/06/2022

A new deep learning (DL) model that can identify disease-related features from images of eyes has been unveiled by a group of Tohoku University researchers. This 'lightweight' DL model can be trained with a small number of images, even ones with a high-degree of noise, and is resource-efficient, meaning it is deployable on mobile devices.
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Image: Radiologists look at brain scans ; Copyright: imagesourcecurated

imagesourcecurated

Single brain scan can diagnose Alzheimer’s disease

22/06/2022

A single MRI scan of the brain could be enough to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research by Imperial College London.
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Image: Two female researchers examine the odor of a sample in a laboratory setting; Copyright: microgen@gmail.com

microgen@gmail.com

Digital nose facilitates early detection and diagnosis

22/06/2022

Many diseases can be treated successfully if they are diagnosed early. Research into a “digital (electronic) nose” is one promising development to facilitate early detection and diagnosis. That’s because body odors and their molecular composition are an early indicator of various diseases that often remain undetected in the early stages.
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Image: Young sick woman talking to a doctor during chemotherapy; Copyright: bialasiewicz

bialasiewicz

AI platform enables doctors to optimize personalized chemotherapy

21/06/2022

Based on a pilot clinical trial, close to 97% of dose recommendations by CURATE.AI were accepted by clinicians; some patients were prescribed optimal doses that were around 20% lower on average.
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Image: A robot arm. Automated Needle Targeting with X-ray; Copyright: Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences

Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences

Automating renal access in kidney stone surgery using AI-enabled robot

20/06/2022

A novel AI-empowered robotic device successfully underwent clinical trial for assisting in percutaneous nephrolithotomy— surgery for removing kidney stones.
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Image: Chest CT data interpreted by AI; Copyright: American Roentgen Ray Society

American Roentgen Ray Society

AI saves one hour of daily chest CT interpretation time in study

17/06/2022

Cardiothoracic radiologists exhibited a 22.1% reduction in chest CT interpretations times when having access to results from an automated AI support platform during real-world clinical practice.
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Image: A computer screen with lines of programming code on it; Copyright: Howell Leung/Leibniz-HKI

Howell Leung/Leibniz-HKI

Liver: The gut microbiome as a health compass

15/06/2022

The human microbiome can provide information regarding the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This has been discovered by an international team led by the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans Knöll Institute.
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Image: Blue-and-violet image of a blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized medicine: Treatment of acute stroke

14/06/2022

A blood clot in the brain that blocks the supply of oxygen can cause an acute stroke. In this case, every minute counts. A team from Empa, the University Hospital in Geneva and the Hirslanden Clinic is currently developing a diagnostic procedure that can be used to start a tailored therapy in a timely manner, as they write in Scientific Reports.
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Image: Illustration of several binary codes ; Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

New method for large-scale data integration and biomarker identification

09/06/2022

A research team led by Prof. ZHAO Fangqing from the Beijing Institute of Life Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has proposed a new algorithm (NetMoss) for efficient integration of large-scale microbiome data and biomarker identification.
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Image: Drawing of a liver that is connected to a magnifying glass by colorful circles; Copyright: Lili Niu © Novo Nordisk Foundation, Center for Protein Research

Lili Niu © Novo Nordisk Foundation, Center for Protein Research

Early diagnosis of liver diseases by proteomics

06/06/2022

Two or three drinks every day could put your liver in danger. Using proteomics and machine learning, researchers now present a revolutionary tool to predict whether an individual has alcohol-related liver disease and if an individual patient is at risk of disease progression.
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Image: Two men are talking in front of a laptop; Copyright: LipiTUM

LipiTUM

Same symptom – different cause?

01/06/2022

Machine learning is playing an ever-increasing role in biomedical research. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed a new method of using molecular data to extract subtypes of illnesses. In the future, this method can help to support the study of larger patient groups.
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Image: A proctologist holds an endoscope in his hand; Copyright: romankosolapov

romankosolapov

Computer-assisted colonoscopy identifies more precancerous polyps

30/05/2022

Colonoscopies performed with computer-aided detection, or artificial intelligence, (AI) saw an increase in the overall rate of detection of adenoma, or cancerous and precancerous polyps, by 27 percent in average-risk patients.
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Image: A detailed virtual model of lung damage ; Copyright: KAUST; Ivan Gromicho

KAUST; Ivan Gromicho

AI helps diagnose post-COVID lung problems

27/05/2022

A new computer-aided diagnostic tool developed by KAUST scientists could help overcome some of the challenges of monitoring lung health following viral infection.
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Image: elderly man holding his chest in pain; Copyright: anontae2522

anontae2522

Speech analysis app predicts worsening heart failure before symptom onset

25/05/2022

A voice analysis app used by heart failure patients at home recognises fluid in the lungs three weeks before an unplanned hospitalisation or escalation in outpatient drug treatment.
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Image: Three man in suits pose in front of the camera; Copyright: private

private

Nephrolytix aims to detect acute kidney injury ten times faster

25/05/2022

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly seen in hospitals. It entails the rapid deterioration of kidney function, a high disease burden, and leads in some cases to death. The team at Nephrolytix GmbH, a new spin-off of Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, has developed a process with the potential to reduce the time it takes to detect AKI – currently 48 to 72 hours – by 90 percent.
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Image: Drawn schematic of a work flow in a laboratory; Copyright: Juliet Percival/MPI für Biochemie

Juliet Percival/MPI für Biochemie

New method revolutionizes cancer diagnosis

24/05/2022

A German-Danish team led by Prof. Matthias Mann has developed a ground-breaking technology called 'Deep Visual Proteomics'. This method provides researchers and clinicians with a protein read-out to understand cancer at single cell-type resolution. The technology was published in the journal Nature Biotechnology and demonstrates its potential in a first application to cancer cells.
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Image: A young woman with long covid symptoms holding her forehead ; Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

Scientists identify characteristics to better define long COVID

20/05/2022

Using machine learning, researchers find patterns in electronic health record data to better identify those likely to have the condition.
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Image: Close-up of a little baby's hand with pacifier: Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

Smart pacifier to monitor infant health in the hospital

18/05/2022

A wireless, bioelectronic pacifier could eliminate the need for invasive, twice-daily blood draws to monitor babies’ electrolytes in Newborn Intensive Care Units or NICUs.
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Image: A disposable microneedle patch is presented: Copyright: Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics / UC San Diego

Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics / UC San Diego

Multi-tasking wearable continuously monitors glucose, alcohol, and lactate

16/05/2022

Imagine being able to measure your blood sugar levels, know if you’ve had too much to drink, and track your muscle fatigue during a workout, all in one small device worn on your skin. Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a prototype of such a wearable that can continuously monitor several health stats—glucose, alcohol, and lactate levels—simultaneously in real-time.
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Image: illustration with colored circles to illustrate the immune system's defences; Copyright: Michele Kellett and James Anderson/University of Washington

Michele Kellett and James Anderson/University of Washington

Model finds COVID-19 deaths among elderly may be due to genetic limit on cell division

13/05/2022

Your immune system’s ability to combat COVID-19, like any infection, largely depends on its ability to replicate the immune cells effective at destroying the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the disease. These cloned immune cells cannot be infinitely created, and a key hypothesis of a new study is that the body’s ability to create these cloned cells falls off significantly in old age.
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Image: A wave chart of statistical hospital occupancy; Copyright: Mathematical Modeling of Infectious Diseases Unit

Mathematical Modeling of Infectious Diseases Unit

Ensemble model to anticipate short-term COVID-19 hospital demand

13/05/2022

For the past two years, the COVID-19 pandemic has exerted pressure on the hospital system, with consequences for patients' care pathways. To support hospital planning strategies, it is important to anticipate COVID-19 health care demand and to continue to improve predictive models.
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Image: Female nurse looks at results on computer; Copyright: engagestock

engagestock

New computational tool to interpret clinical significance of cancer mutations

12/05/2022

The software, called CancerVar, standardizes procedures to help researchers assess the clinical impacts of over 13 million somatic cancer mutations.
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Image: Mikael Benson, professor at Linköping University ; Copyright: Thor Balkhed/Linköping University

Thor Balkhed/Linköping University

"Digital twins" aid to give individual patients the right treatment

11/05/2022

An international team of researchers have developed advanced computer models, or "digital twins", of diseases, with the goal of improving diagnosis and treatment.
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Image: Man during a speech therapy training via tablet; Copyright: SpeechCare GmbH

SpeechCare GmbH

When speaking is difficult

06/05/2022

Within the »HiSSS« project, Fraunhofer IDMT is making an important contribution to logopaedic therapy after a stroke.
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Image: The new multi-organ chip is shown; Copyright: Kacey Ronaldson-Bouchard/Columbia Engineering

Kacey Ronaldson-Bouchard/Columbia Engineering

Plug-and-play organ-on-a-chip can be customized to the patient

05/05/2022

Major advance from Columbia Engineering team demonstrates first multi-organ chip made of engineered human tissues linked by vascular flow for improved modeling of systemic diseases like cancer
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Image: Shaopeng Wang poses for the camera; Copyright: The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University

The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University

A sharper image for proteins

05/05/2022

To fully understand proteins and their myriad functions, researchers have developed sophisticated means to see and study them using advanced microscopy, enhanced light detection, imaging software and the integration of advanced hardware systems. A new study from Arizona State University describes a new technique that promises to revolutionize the imaging of proteins and other vital biomolecules.
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Image: Doctor in a telemedicine conversation; Copyright: KaikaTaaK

KaikaTaaK

Study: telehealth comparable to in-person care

04/05/2022

A study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that, on average, patients participating in an initial telehealth consult for a new health condition did not require more unplanned hospitalizations or follow-up emergency department visits within 14 days of their initial consult compared with patients making an initial in-person visit.
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Image: Researchers in a laboratory; Copyright: Freya Lücke, UKSH

Freya Lücke, UKSH

Leukaemia: Previously unknown risk factors in adulthood

29/04/2022

New research from the Clinical Research Unit "CATCH ALL" at Kiel University and UKSH identifies genetic causes for treatment resistance in BCP-ALL.
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Image: Prof. Dr Ilona Croy explains on the whiteboard; Copyright: Anne Günther/Uni Jena

Anne Günther/Uni Jena

Diagnostics: Digitisation of the sense of smell

29/04/2022

The University of Jena is involved in EU-funded research project to detect pathologically altered body odours.
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Image: Shandong Wu smiles at the camera; Copyright: UPMC

UPMC

Machine learning model can steer traumatic brain injury patients to life-saving care

28/04/2022

A prognostic model developed by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine data scientists and UPMC neurotrauma surgeons is the first to use automated brain scans and machine learning to inform outcomes in patients with severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI).
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Image: Microscope image: damage to lung tissue caused by the invasive fungal infection aspergillosis.; Copyright: Zoltán Cseresnyés/Leibniz-HKI

Zoltán Cseresnyés/Leibniz-HKI

How do fungal infections spread in the human lung?

22/04/2022

A chip model allows us to observe growth in the tissue.
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Image: 3D illustration of colon cancer; Copyright: PantherMedia  / animaxx3d

PantherMedia / animaxx3d

AI reduces miss rate of precancerous polyps in colorectal cancer screening

22/04/2022

Artificial intelligence reduced by twofold the rate at which precancerous polyps were missed in colorectal cancer screening, reported a team of international researchers led by Mayo Clinic.
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Image: smartphone with diabetes app, in front lays the smart insulin pen; Copyright: Nico Arnold | diafyt MedTech

Nico Arnold | diafyt MedTech

Managing diabetes with diafyt thanks to self-learning and smart technology

22/04/2022

We all make mistakes from time to time or forget to do things. But people with diabetes can have serious health problems if they miscalculate or inject the wrong insulin dose. A research team from the Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden) and a startup from Leipzig aim to make living with diabetes easier.
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Image: Scientist fills microplates ; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Want to 3D print a kidney? Start by thinking small

21/04/2022

Stevens computational model aims to accelerate microfluidic bio-printing that opens up a pathway for 3D printing any kind of organ at any time.
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Image: Elderly man with stroke symptoms; Copyright: PantherMedia  / AndrewLozovyi

PantherMedia / AndrewLozovyi

Telestroke program prevents unnecessary hospital transfers

18/04/2022

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Health Administration (VHA) National Telestroke Program has made expert stroke care quickly available to patients, even at rural facilities with limited staffing.
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Image: A MRI image of a heart arrhythmia; Copyright: Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University

AI predicts if - and when - someone will have cardiac arrest

15/04/2022

A new artificial intelligence-based approach can predict, significantly more accurately than a doctor, if and when a patient could die of cardiac arrest.
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Image: An illustration of a male body with the pancreas highlighted; Copyright: PantherMedia  / magicmine

PantherMedia / magicmine

AI model may predict elevated pancreatic cancer risk using EHR

13/04/2022

An artificial intelligence (AI) model trained using sequential health information derived from electronic health records identified a subset of individuals with a 25-fold risk of developing pancreatic cancer within three to 36 months
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Image: Colored 3D-model of parts of a cell; Copyright: University of Freiburg

University of Freiburg

Insights into the dynamic ultrastructure of the heart

12/04/2022

What happens below the cellular level when the heart contracts and relaxes has long been unexplored. Thanks to new ultra-high-resolution electron microscopy techniques, scientists can now watch the heart beating – almost at a molecular level.
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Image: Cartoon showing how the real-time graph depicting the AI's analysis can help screening ultrasound videos; Copyright: RIKEN

RIKEN

Doctors diagnosing fetal heart disease benefit from explanatory AI

08/04/2022

Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project (AIP) and colleagues have tested AI-enhanced diagnosis of fetal congenital heart disease in a clinical setting.
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Image: Telemedicine conversation with a doctor; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Andriy Popov

PantherMedia / Andriy Popov

Pandemic drives use of telehealth for mental health care

07/04/2022

OHSU researchers expect mental health counseling online will endure beyond the pandemic, call for caution to improve disparities in telehealth access.
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Image: Device for single particle combinatorial lipidic nanocontainer fusion dots; Copyright: Nikos Hatzakis, University of Copenhagen

Nikos Hatzakis, University of Copenhagen

Revolutionary tool will meet future pandemics with accelerated response

07/04/2022

A new tool speeds up development of vaccines and other pharmaceutical products by more than one million times while minimizing costs.
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Image: Man in military jacket touches his head from exhaustion; Copyright: PantherMedia  / AndrewLozovyi

PantherMedia / AndrewLozovyi

Mobile app reduces post-traumatic stress

06/04/2022

Support offered by a phone app can relieve post-traumatic stress and depression. A new study from Uppsala University’s National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry involving 179 patients shows that a dedicated PTSD app, PTSD Coach, helps adults suffering from mental health issues after traumatic events.
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Image: Man holds hand to his back with visualized visible spine; Copyright: PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia

PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia

Treating chronic pain phases with an AI-powered app

05/04/2022

The treatment of chronic and acute pain phases centers on the patient’s pain profile. The treatment strategies must be flexible to facilitate customized adjustments. The AI-powered pain treatment solution by medicalmotion offers support and makes individualized exercise recommendations to manage the individual needs of pain patients with neuromusculoskeletal disorders.
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Image: Smiling man with short brown hair and dark suit – Prof. Dominik Bach; Copyright: Barbara Frommann/Uni Bonn

Barbara Frommann/Uni Bonn

Understanding the brain with AI: Dominik Bach new Hertz Professor at University of Bonn

05/04/2022

The University of Bonn has once again received excellent reinforcement: Dominik Bach now fills a so-called Hertz Chair, which is designed to combine disciplines in a unique way.
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Image: A young woman with a fever thermometer sits in front of her laptop and has an online conversation with her doctor; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andriy Popov

PantherMedia/Andriy Popov

Telemedicine as an alternative: contactless and secure diagnoses

01/04/2022

Concrete diagnoses are the be-all and end-all in medicine. The Corona pandemic made the conditions for good diagnostics more difficult. Telemedicine offers an alternative - not only in times of pandemic. It is important to exploit the full potential of technical possibilities. Robot-assisted examinations and artificial intelligence can make an important contribution to symptom recognition.
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Image: Schematic of optoacoustic neural stimulation; Copyright: Shi, Jiang, et al.

Shi, Jiang, et al.

Optoacoustics for high-precision neuromodulation

01/04/2022

Optoacoustic neuromodulation offers the high penetration depth of ultrasound, plus the high spatial precision of photons, enabling new horizons for neuroscience
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Image: Man clutching his heart; Copyright: PantherMedia  / alexAleksei (YAYMicro)

PantherMedia / alexAleksei (YAYMicro)

AI enables personalized treatment of myocarditis

01/04/2022

A research team from the University of Bern and Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, has received funding from the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine for a research project to personalize the diagnosis and treatment of myocarditis. In the future, the use of artificial intelligence will allow personalized, individualized risk assessment and prognostication.
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Image: A woman is sleeping in her bed, next to her a smartphone; Copyright: PantherMedia/kleberpicui

PantherMedia/kleberpicui

Respiratory diseases: "AI helps patients track symptom severity"

01/04/2022

When they are presented with respiratory disease, physicians listen to the lungs and airways to assess the sound of the patient’s breath and cough. Artificial intelligence now helps patients with respiratory diseases even outside of the doctor’s office: "ResGuard Med" monitors coughing during the night, detects the worsening of symptoms and issues an alert.
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Image: two people looking at an ECG; Copyright: PantherMedia/photographee.eu

PantherMedia/photographee.eu

Diagnostics as a service: stroke prevention with the dpv-ritmo system

01/03/2022

Atrial Fibrillation is the most common type of persistent heart arrhythmia, affecting around half a million Germans alone. People with atrial fibrillation have a greater risk for ischemic stroke, making early and effective treatment critical to prevent serious complications. Unfortunately, many patients don’t even know they have atrial Fibrillation.
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Image: Hand-made duty roster; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Mathias Fengler

AI: Automating healthcare workforce planning

01/02/2022

The shortage of healthcare workers is a social challenge that must be properly addressed. Pradtke GmbH teamed up with the Bochum Institute of Technology gGmbH and contec GmbH in the research project titled "AI-powered healthcare workforce planning and management" (KI-unterstützte Personaleinsatzplanung und-steuerung im Gesundheitswesen, KI-PEPS).
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Image: A person with a smartphone in hand is standing in front of a computer-generated model of the liver; Copyright: PantherMedia/happysuthida

PantherMedia/happysuthida

AI-driven laboratory diagnostics with medicalvalues

25/01/2022

Lab results are often complex and not easy to interpret. For many diseases, a medical diagnosis requires the analysis and combination of different values. That’s why one of the themes at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM at MEDICA 2021 highlighted "Integrative and AI-driven diagnostics" - and illustrated how AI can help interpret laboratory results and values.
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Image: A person in a lab coat is holding a device with an antenna extended into a glass; Coypright: Universität des Saarlandes

Universität des Saarlandes

Coronavirus: Using odors to detect an infection

10/01/2022

Rapid COVID-19 tests can be rather uncomfortable as samples are typically collected with a deep nasal or throat swab. Scientists now explore an alternative to rapid diagnostic tests based on a patient’s breath.
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Image: The Vemo System® with a patient and therapists; Copyright: Reactive Robotics

Reactive Robotics

Robotics in Intensive Care Units: "Stand Patients up on Their Feet and Let Them Walk"

04/01/2022

Robotics have made their way into many areas in healthcare. So far, intensive care units had not utilized robotic systems. Now there is an application that facilitates ICU care tasks.
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Image: a woman is getting her eyes scanned for diseases; Copyright: PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

Deep Learning: How artificial neural networks can support diagnostics

03/12/2021

The use of artificial intelligence and deep learning in medical diagnostics is growing rapidly. Ubotica’s neural network is based on deep learning and detects the presence of diabetic retinopathy in retinal images. Dr. Holger Pfeifer talks about the project successes, and reveals the obstacles researchers must continue to overcome in adopting deep learning systems.
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Image: Person stands in front of an operating table and holds VR glasses in his hand; Copyright: PantherMedia / Romaset

PantherMedia / Romaset

Fostering Digital Health Competency Skills with Continuing Education

01/12/2021

Digital health solutions play an increasingly important role among physicians and healthcare professionals, which means they must gain the relevant competency skills to succeed in this area. The digital transformation of the healthcare sector has opened many new opportunities that are now permeating the work of medical professionals.
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Image: Hand is holding a smartphone with an opened health app; Copyright: Health2Sync

Health2Sync

AI in healthcare: How to build a technology ecosystem

02/11/2021

Taiwan has long been a model for the implementation and use of new technologies. It is thus only natural that Taiwanese companies are forerunners when it comes to Artificial Intelligence (AI) in healthcare. This is also one of the topics of this year’s MEDICA CONNECTED HEALTHCARE FORUM.
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Image: Entrance of the Messe Düsseldorf, at the floor a MEDICA logo next to the writing “MEDICA – Welcome”; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA 2021: Return to the fair halls!

02/11/2021

The last year was quite different, since MEDICA had to take place online due to the Corona pandemic – but in 2021 we return to the fair halls in Düsseldorf again! There are not only about 2.900 exhibitors from 70 nations expecting you, but also a rich program in our forums and conferences. We took an advanced peek on some of the exciting highlights for you in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: a robot arm holding a small glass; Copyright: PantherMedia / Bork

PantherMedia / Bork

The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization

01/10/2021

In the laboratory, there is some work that is time-consuming and monotonous – making it the perfect place for digital solutions such as artificial intelligence or robotics. But what work can these systems really take on in a meaningful way, in which areas of the lab are they present today, and where do they still need to be improved?
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Image: Data sheets and ampoules on a desk; Copyright: PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

Diligent helpers in data analysis: How AI becomes transparent and reproducible

01/10/2021

Huge amounts of data are generated in the laboratory every day, which have to be analyzed by hand. This is where artificial intelligence (AI) comes into play as a perfect helper: Because it evaluates such data volumes faster than humans ever could. The only problem with AI is: when it is developed, there is hardly any guideline or standard that makes AI systems comparable with each other.
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Image: Person on a treadmill wears a smart watch which shows his or her heart rate; Copyright: PantherMedia/apid

More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables

01/09/2021

Wearables are increasingly being used in sports medicine, for example, to prevent injuries or to provide users individually with real-time data about their fitness and health. By analyzing this data, risks for sports injuries can be identified early and training can be customized to the user's needs and goals.
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Image: a woman with dark hair doing sit ups, wearing a fitnesstracker; Copyright: Robert Bosch GmbH

Robert Bosch GmbH

Avoid injuries, improve training – with self-learning sensors

01/09/2021

Artificial intelligence, sensors, wearables: they all collect and process data from their wearers. They are particularly popular in sports, because users no longer have to rely on their intuition, but can optimise their training based on sober, exact data. However, wearables are often criticized for being not only practical gadgets but also data krakens.
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Image: A female runner is kneeling at the roadside and using her smartwatch; Copyright: PantherMedia/I_am_Daniel

PantherMedia/I_am_Daniel

Running: how to prevent injuries with sensors and AI

01/09/2021

The most common injury that affects runners stems from overuse, not falls. Early warning signs include changes in motion. Successful injury prevention could pick up on this aspect by detecting and responding to these deviations at an early stage. It is the focus of the "Smart Injury Prevention" project.
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Image: woman wearing sports clothing stretches her leg, she wears a smart watch; Copyright: PantherMedia/Maridav (YAYMicro)

Wearables: smart helpers in sports medicine

01/09/2021

Heart rate monitoring, step-counting, sleep tracking: Wearable technologies keep evolving, offering more and more useful applications. Usually worn close to and/or on the surface of the skin, they are equipped with special sensors to detect and analyze information concerning physical signals or ambient data. This allows wearers to get immediate biofeedback.
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Image: Surface of the CASUS-Software; Copyright: Universität Augsburg

Universität Augsburg

Learning at your own pace: virtual patients in medical education

22/07/2021

As an important part of their education, medical students learn clinical skills by practicing on patients. Unfortunately, this was sometimes not an option amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The solution? Training with virtual patients. Even post-pandemic, they are a great learning tool for future medical professionals.
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Image: Doctor in medical gowns types on a tablet; Copyright: PantherMedia/rogerphoto

PantherMedia/rogerphoto

Accelerating digitization of hospitals through innovation

10/06/2021

Helping hospitals in Germany build a long-term digitization strategy - that is the declared goal of the young founding team of the innovation go platform, which started at the Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences. The project is funded by EXIST, a support program of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi).
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Treatment table in an intensive care unit in a hospital; Copyright: PantherMedia / sudok1

PantherMedia / sudok1

Smart Expert System Assists Medical Diagnostics

12/05/2021

A current research project develops a system designed to support critical care physicians in the future. The research project "A Learning and Interoperable Smart Expert System for Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine (ELISE)" uses data collected via machine learning algorithms to assist diagnostic decision-making.
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Image: a person holding a smartphone with both hands, a healthcare app is opened; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andriy Popov

Digital healthcare: Treating patients at home

03/05/2021

Digital health apps (DiGA) are increasingly becoming part of patients' everyday lives. Since the "apps on prescription" are thoroughly tested by the BfArM before approval, they are currently only tailored to individual diseases. In this Topic of the Month, we take a look at the place DiGAs already occupy in healthcare today and how they will continue to develop in the future.
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Image: Two hospital employees fill a shelf in a storage room with medical supplies; Copyright: PantherMedia/SimpleFoto

PantherMedia/SimpleFoto

Hospital logistics: three action steps to future success

22/04/2021

Behind every hospital are sophisticated and complex logistics that must run like clockwork to keep things going. But how good are the processes when it comes to managing patient care and hospital staff? There are many weak links that can be avoided. Comprehensive digitization and efficient, targeted healthcare workforce management are required to set up hospital logistics for future success.
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Image: A woman sitting in front of a device for an eye examination; Copyright: PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

Alzheimer's disease: early detection using an eye exam

22/03/2021

Alzheimer's disease is still incurable, but if detected early enough, countermeasures can improve treatment and slow the progression. Unfortunately, there is still no reliable early detection test at this juncture. This might soon change thanks to a non-invasive spectroscopy of the retina.
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Image: Rescue team in action; Copyright: PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

Mobile and intelligent – emergency blood analysis

08/03/2021

Things need to move fast in an emergency. Making the right call in this setting can be a challenge for emergency medical services – especially when symptoms are ambiguous, which is the case if a patient has difficulty breathing or exhibits a cardiovascular or poisoning emergency. A blood analysis is paramount to deliver a fast and accurate diagnosis. This is where mobOx comes in.
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Image: disinfection of a door handle around which coronaviruses are flying; Copyright: PantherMedia/AntonMatyukha

Necessity is the mother of invention – innovations in the corona pandemic

01/03/2021

Keeping your distance, washing your hands, wearing a mask – such protective measures have been the order of the day since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic began. But appropriate products or procedures are not suitable for everyone, are often unavailable or, despite everything, carry a residual risk. The need for new, better solutions is high. But necessity is the mother of invention.
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Image: A physician with a tablet computer in one hand is standing next to a patient’s bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia LtD

PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia LtD

Hospital: how an AI tool could improve patient safety

22/02/2021

Sometimes, a hospital stay can proceed successfully without a hitch. At other times, there might be an unexpected turn of events if the patient exhibits complications. Early identification of these patients could prevent unnecessary suffering. A new research project intends to develop an AI-based tool that predicts a patient’s risk of complications at an early stage.
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Image: a woman wearing a wearable EEG that looks like a headband; Copyright: Evercot AI GmbH

Evercot AI GmbH

Good connection: AI and EEG work hand in hand

17/02/2021

Artificial intelligences (AI) are able to help medical professionals detect diseases. This is based on medical data records from which the AI can draw conclusions about diseases. These conclusions are most accurate when the extraction of the data sets is directly linked to the processing.
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Image: young woman sitting on the couch with a smartphone; Copyright: PantherMedia/Y-Boychenko

PantherMedia/Y-Boychenko

Gender medicine – analog and digital

10/02/2021

There are key differences between men and women, yet medicine has been treating both sexes the same for decades. As a result, women may not always receive the most optimal care. While there is now a shift in mindset, previous findings and outdated thinking patterns are far too often still finding their way into digital health services and technologies.
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Image: A physician is looking at a tablet computer while two nurses care for an intensive care patient in the background; Copyright: PantherMedia/SimpleFoto

PantherMedia/SimpleFoto

BabSim.Hospital: forecasting hospital bed needs

04/02/2021

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, capacity of intensive care units is a hot-button issue as this determines the number of severe COVID-19 cases hospitals can treat. The percentage of currently infected patients can deliver insights into the projected need for ICU beds down the road. The TH Köln developed a tool to help with this planning process.
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Image: Artist’s rendering of small star-shaped machines between red blood cells; Copyright: PantherMedia/Michael Osterrieder

Autonomous medical devices: running well in your body

01/02/2021

In theory, autonomous medical technologies can be used in a diagnostic or therapeutic capacity inside the body under certain conditions. This may not sound like a new invention at first. After all, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators have monitored and fixed abnormal heart rhythm for many years.
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Image: Artist’s rendering of small robots with grapplers and searchlights that swim between red blood cells; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andreus

Autonomous medical technology: independently in the body

01/02/2021

Therapies need to be carried out with high reliability by trained personal. This will not change in the future. But maybe we will be able to let systems in the patient’s body do some of the work. Some approaches are already aiming to make implants more independent so they will be able to flexibly react to changes. Read more in our Topic of the Month!
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Image: woman holding an asthma inhaler in one hand and a smartphone in the other; Copyright: PantherMedia/microgen

Asthma: Self-management thanks to apps and wearables

11/01/2021

Today, managing one's own chronic disease is hardly possible without digital helpers – not least because of the corona pandemic. People with asthma also benefit from apps and wearables. They help patients connect better with doctors and better understand their own disease. Our Topic of the Month looks at why this is so important and what the digital services can do.
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Image: empty operating room with disinfection robot; Copyright: stock.adobe.com/allensima

Disinfection: a robot nips viruses in the bud

02/11/2020

Hospitals are considered to be a primary route of disease transmission. That is why patient rooms, operating rooms, and waiting areas should be disinfected regularly and thoroughly - and not just during the coronavirus pandemic. At the virtual.MEDICA trade fair, ICA Traffic GmbH will showcase the HERO21 robot, a disinfection unit that uses UVC radiation.
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Image: The hand of a hospital employee at a device next to an intensive care bed with a patient in it; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

PantherMedia/sudok1

AI predicts a patient's risk of postoperative complications

22/10/2020

Whether it is a routine surgery or a personalized surgical intervention that perhaps has never been done before: There is always a residual risk involved. That’s why hospitals monitor and supervise patient care before, during, and after surgery to be ready for immediate intervention if needed.
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Image: Symbols from everyday hospital life as digital images coming from a stethoscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/everythingposs

Smart Hospital: Digitally Connected Healthcare

01/10/2020

Every year, new technologies hit the market. They expand, update, and connect hospitals and healthcare facilities. But advancing digitization not only accelerates the speed of improvements, it also uncovers problem areas that must still be fixed.
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Image: Connected areas of a treatment displayed as icons; Copyright: PantherMedia/Sonar

The digital hospital: integration and digitization

01/10/2020

Whether it's process automation, robotics in the OR and nursing areas, or the digitalization of patient records - in a smart hospital, everything comes together to form a connected hospital. Find out exactly how the Smart Hospital is being developed with the help of information platforms and projects in the Topic of the Month.
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Image: Patient lying in a hospital bed with a monitor attached; Copyright: BEWATEC

ConnectedCare: hospital roadmap to becoming a Smart Hospital

01/10/2020

Scheduling, bed management, and menu ordering – today’s hospitals take advantage of a variety of digital services. In the worst-case scenario, each service requires a different interface to the central information system, marking a major barrier that holds back digitization. With ConnectedCare, BEWATEC shows there is a better way.
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Image: View into an automated laboratory machine that stores a lot of vials; Copyright: PantherMedia/kagemusha

The smart networking laboratory: when connected devices become one system

01/09/2020

Diagnostics, biomedical research, screening active ingredient candidates - laboratories perform many functions and must be flexible. Growing and evolving healthcare demands mean labs have to process an increasing number of samples. Modern laboratory information management systems can already support high-throughput, but a smart laboratory environment can make things even more efficient.
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Image: A miniaturized, round sensor under a fingertip; Copyright: TU Dresden

SmartLab: all-in-one automation, digitalization, and miniaturization

01/09/2020

Laboratories have to analyze and interpret an ever-increasing number of samples for research and diagnostic services, generating lots of data in the process. At the same time, labs are required to produce quality results and operate with speed. Processes that could once be managed using laboratory notebooks and isolated systems must become smart in the future to improve lab efficiency.
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Image: View into a device that automatically processes laboratory samples; Copyright: PantherMedia/Sonar

The laboratory 4.0: networked analyses

01/09/2020

There is likely no other branch of medicine where you can find as many high-tech devices as in modern laboratories. A major part of diagnostic and biomedical research is done here. A lot of individual steps in work processes need to be followed precisely to ensure the results’ quality. Also, a lot of data is generated here.
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Image: medical symbols around the earth in the hands of a person; Copyright: PantherMedia/everythingposs

PantherMedia/everythingposs

Israeli medical devices showcase digital innovations at MEDICA

24/08/2020

For the annual MEDICA trade fair, companies from all over the world assemble in Düsseldorf. The Israel Export Institute has been a part of it for the last couple of years. They present medical devices and digital innovations from different Israeli companies at their joint booth.
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Image: Application of AR sonography; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGD

Fraunhofer IGD

Augmented reality ultrasound: putting the focus on patients

10/08/2020

This is how a conventional ultrasound scan works: patients lie down on a table next to the ultrasound machine. A doctor uses a probe to scan the part of the body in question, while he or she looks at the pictures on a monitor. In other words, the physician either focuses on his/her hand on the patient or the monitor. The Fraunhofer IGD wants to change this process as part of the "sonAR" project.
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Image: Nurse checking surveillance monitor at the bedside and writing down patient data on a clipboard; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

PantherMedia/Kzenon

Big Data: early warning system for the ICU

03/08/2020

Patient monitoring systems in the ICU sound up to 700 alarms on average per patient per day, which boils down to one alarm every two minutes. An excessive number of them are false alarms. This generates vast amounts of data, which can make it difficult for doctors and nurses to identify the most critical alarms to manage. It also has a negative effect on the treatment of intensive care patients.
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Image: Three ice hockey players fighting for the puck; Copyright: PantherMedia/fotokvadrat

PantherMedia/fotokvadrat

MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE: how data and AI help sports

16/06/2020

Karl Schwarzenbrunner is the head of the Education and Science Department at the German Ice Hockey Association, and also a speaker at the 8th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE 2020, which will take place this year on 18 and 19 November in Düsseldorf.
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Image: Surgeon sitting at a robot-assisted operating system; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wedmov

Robotic-Assisted Surgery with the daVinci-System

04/05/2020

Robotic surgical systems are often used to perform minimally invasive procedures. The daVinci surgical system is still one of the market leaders and is especially well suited to perform prostatectomies, a surgical option for prostate cancer.
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Image: View of a robot-mounted system from above; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wedmov

Robots in the Operating Room: Improving Training and Safety

04/05/2020

Surgical robots are transforming the operating room. They deliver many benefits but also present new challenges. That is why the efficient handling of robotic mechanisms must also be reflected in the respective training courses.
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Image: Robotic arm used for surgical operations; Copyright: panthermedia.net/markoaliaksandr

Innovative Robotic-Assisted Surgical Systems

04/05/2020

More compact, more flexibility, and more precision - these are the main characteristics developers strive for as they advance robotic-assisted surgical systems for the operating room. Several technology providers have already shown how it’s done, including the makers of the popular daVinci Surgical System. Yet for robotic-assisted systems, the sky is the limit.
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Image: robotic system for assistance in surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Robotics in the OR: Relieving the surgeon

04/05/2020

In the operating room, minimally invasive procedures are increasingly used. Robot-assisted systems are a great help for the surgeon. They support the surgeon and are extremely precise. Through innovative research approaches, robotic systems are constantly evolving.
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Image: Smiling man is standing in nature with one had at his ear; Copyright: panthermedia.net/cristalov

panthermedia.net/cristalov

In-ear sensors for monitoring vital parameters

22/04/2020

Wearables offer practical solutions for the flexible measurement of data. The sensor from cosinuss° is worn directly in the ear and offers a precise monitoring of vital parameters.
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Image: young woman makes an ultrasound with the new system and shows patient the image on her smartphone; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Ultrasound to go: versatile partner on hospital rounds

08/04/2020

The University Hospital Bonn has recently introduced an ultrasound device that's small enough to fit in your coat pocket. It's ready to use once you have connected it to a tablet or smartphone. The portable system makes bedside physical exams possible. The device primarily benefits students as it allows them to combine basic knowledge and clinical application.
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Image: A device with a large monitor and different control panels in a darkened laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA – PAMB

Fraunhofer IPA – PAMB

Cardiovascular diseases: using AI to navigate the catheter

09/03/2020

Treatment of a heart attack or stroke caused by vascular occlusion must be prompt to prevent further damage to vital tissue. Unfortunately, the actual treatment is often preceded by a lengthy catheter-based procedure where the cardiologist manually guides the catheter to the affected vessel. AI might perform this task in the future.
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Image: Heart symbols are floating over a smartphone in the hand of a physician; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thodonal

Digital cardiology: analyzing data beat by beat

03/02/2020

Chronic cardiovascular diseases are a growing burden worldwide. Most of them are diseases of civilization that spread, where lifestyle is improving or where it is good already. But the healthcare systems are not growing equally to keep up with this development. We can make up for this by making cardiological care smarter with eHealth and mHealth.
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Image: person holding hand to the heart with a graphic depiction of a heart in front of them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/suriyaphoto

Cardisiography: A Non-Invasive Heart Screening Test

03/02/2020

Coronary heart disease can come as a complete surprise and occur suddenly. Cardisiography was designed to lower the risk and make faster intervention possible. As a non-invasive heart screening test, cardisiography offers the possibility of early detection for heart diseases.
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