Interviews 2018 -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: A physician wearing VR glasses. An image of the human heart floats in front of him in the air; Copyright: apoQlar

Virtual Surgical Intelligence: Microsoft Hololens in the OR

22.07.2019

Modern imaging opens news doors to surgeries. Yet it also poses major problems for surgeons: They use two-dimensional images to navigate through a three-dimensional surgical environment, while they continuously have to switch their focus back and forth between the images and the patient. Now help is on the way in the form of interactive 3D projections and mixed reality (MR).
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Image: someone points on MRI images of a knee with a pen; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Bernhard Lelle

Imaging: arthroscopy is more effective than MRI for chondral defects of the knee

12.07.2019

Using arthroscopy to stage a lesion in the chondral area of the knee is more accurate than magnetic resonance imaging, according to researchers from the Rothman Institute, La Jolla, Calif. The findings were presented today at the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.
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Image: man in front of a written chart; Copyright: University of Houston

Imaging: combination of super microscope and supercomputer to target new treatments

12.07.2019

Badri Roysam, chair of the University of Houston Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, is leading a $3.19 million project to create new technology that could provide an unprecedented look at the injured brain.
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Image: patient with a knee injury; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Csaba Deli

Imaging: MRI scanner diagnoses knee injuries accurately

04.07.2019

The team say the device – which uses so-called "magic angle" effect - could potentially help diagnose knee injuries more quickly, and more accurately. In a proof-of-concept study using animal knees, the results suggest the technology could be used to show all the structures of the knee.
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Image: physician examinates a patient with the portable device by holding the device and a smartphone in front of the patient's eye; Copyright: Phelcom Technologies

mHealth: portable device can be used to diagnose eye disease remotely

26.06.2019

A portable device connected to a smartphone makes precise images of the retina to detect back-of-the-eye (fundus) disease at a far lower cost than conventional methods. Created by Phelcom Technologies, a startup based at São Carlos in São Paulo State, Brazil, the Eyer can be used for remote diagnosis by an ophthalmologist via telemedicine.
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Image: MRI image of the heart; Copyright: Eike Nagel, Goethe Universität

Imaging: non-invasive view into the heart

25.06.2019

The non-invasive measurement of blood flow to the heart using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is on par with cardiac catheterization. This was the result of an international study published in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and headed by researchers from Goethe University.
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24.06.2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Image: Grey and white image of a tube with small holes at the end; Copyright: Michael Tanner, Herriot-Watt University and the University of Edinburgh

Tiny lung probe sheds light on disease

21.06.2019

A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists. The new technology could pave the way for accurate monitoring of tissue in areas where existing technologies cannot reach.
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Image: Logo of brainlife.io; Copyright: brainlife.io

Cloud-computing web platform for neuroscience research

19.06.2019

Scientists in the United States, Europe and South America are reporting how a new cloud-computing web platform allows scientists to track data and analyses on the brain, potentially reducing delays in discovery. The project, called brainlife.io, is led by Franco Pestilli, associate professor at Indiana University, in collaboration with colleagues across the university.
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Image: different images of an artery; Copyright: Sung Soo Sean Choi et al.

Imaging: new modality targets cholesterol in arterial plaque

18.06.2019

In an article published in the peer-reviewed SPIE publication Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), "Frequency-domain differential photoacoustic radar: theory and validation for ultra-sensitive atherosclerotic plaque imaging," researchers demonstrate a new imaging modality that successfully identifies the presence of cholesterol in the arterial plaque.
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Functional Imaging: The puls of modern oncology

17.06.2019

Medical imaging techniques have developed considerably in recent decades. In addition to morphological imaging techniques more and more functional imaging techniques are used in oncology that can continously record the functions of specific organs locally and regionally in real time. These are groundbreaking for diagnostics, therapies and preoperative preparations.
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Image: Woman undergoing a CT scan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tyler Olsonv

Machine learning: superior results for low-dose CT

12.06.2019

Machine learning has the potential to vastly advance medical imaging, particularly computerized tomography (CT) scanning, by reducing radiation exposure and improving image quality. Those new research findings were just published in Nature Machine Intelligence by engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and radiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
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Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11.06.2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
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Image: patient with Parkinson`s playing with a puzzle; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AndrewLozovyi

Ultrasound: restoring dopaminergic pathway at Parkinson's

11.06.2019

While there are several thousand drugs available to treat brain diseases, they cannot penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain. The BBB, which protects the brain from pathogens, also prevents most drugs from gaining access to the brain functional tissue, a well-known challenge to the treatment of all brain diseases including neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease.
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Image: Woman investigates cell in a laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Cell analysis: deep learning dive to cell division

10.06.2019

Combining tissue imaging and artificial intelligence, Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina probed deeper into how cell division cycles are regulated, in this study released online in the May 2019 issue of Cell Reports.
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Image: Two men standing in a staircase; Copyright: James Shewaga, University of Saskatchewan

Magnetic therapy reverses concussion symptoms

05.06.2019

Concussion symptoms - such as loss of balance, hazy comprehension, sleep disturbance and ability to walk straight - can be reversed by a new type of magnetic stimulation, research at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.
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Image: A small hamster covering its eyes with its paws; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Aleksei Ivanov

A new era of small animal imaging research

04.06.2019

A collaborative study between McGill University and the University of Antwerp allows PET scanning on animals without the use of anesthesia.
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Image: Two physicians are talking to a wheelchair user; Copyright: Kessler Foundation

Orthopedics: Grant to treat shoulder injuries in wheelchair users

03.06.2019

The New Jersey Commission on Spinal Cord Research awarded a $549,000 grant to Trevor Dyson-Hudson, MD, of Kessler Foundation; the grant is one of three awarded to Foundation scientists for spinal cord injury research, totaling $1.74 million.
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Image: look over the shoulder of two doctors discussing brain scans; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Imaging: altered brain activity in antisocial teenagers

29.05.2019

Teenage girls with problematic social behavior display reduced brain activity and weaker connectivity between the brain regions implicated in emotion regulation. The findings of an international study now offer a neurobiological explanation for the difficulties some girls have in controlling their emotions, and provide indications for possible therapy approaches.
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Images: Researchers work with microscopes; Copyright: panthermedia.net / LightField Studios

Microscope: Technology revolutionizes drug development

22.05.2019

The search for new drugs to combat diseases more effectively could be revolutionised through a new £30 million electron microscopy project. Experts would be able to see, for the first time, how a particular drug works within a patient at a cellular level or the molecular processes set in motion by a genetic mutation.
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Image: New deep-learning model for lung cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / belchonock

AI: System spots lung cancer before radiologists

22.05.2019

Deep learning - a form of artificial intelligence - was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine.
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Image: Doctor analyzes images of brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / EvgeniyShkolenko

Neuroimaging: Big data helps improve diagnosis accuracy

20.05.2019

A team of researchers from Osaka University and The University of Tokyo developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG), demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG.
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Image: Two health care providers conducting an endoscopic examination of the gastrointestinal tract; Copyright: Privolzhsky Research Medical University, Russia

Do upper and lower GI endoscopies on the same day!

17.05.2019

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have shown benefits from "bundling" upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies on the same day to remedy what they say is the "disturbingly" large number of older Americans currently being scheduled for the procedures on two different days.
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Image: MR image of a human torso with a part marked in green; Copyright: University Hospital Zurich

MR-guided treatment for life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia

15.05.2019

In a world first, UHZ has succeeded in treating a patient with life-threatening cardiac arrythmia using MR-controlled radio ablation.
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Image: woman with breast cancer and child in her arms; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ArturVerkhovetskiy

AI: Novel method predicts future risk of breast cancer

14.05.2019

Researchers from two major institutions have developed a new tool with advanced artificial intelligence (AI) methods to predict a woman's future risk of breast cancer.
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Image: doctor points at an brain imaging; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sudok1

Imaging: New technique uses protein of scorpion venom

13.05.2019

A novel imaging technique that uses a synthesized form of scorpion venom to light up brain tumors has shown promise in a clinical trial. The imaging system enables neurosurgeons to better see malignant growths that often are difficult to fully eliminate.
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Image: head of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tyler Olson

Imaging: Dataset bridges human vision and machine learning

08.05.2019

Neuroscientists and computer vision scientists say a new dataset of unprecedented size - comprising brain scans of four volunteers who each viewed 5,000 images - will help researchers better understand how the brain processes images.
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Image: Doctors investigating scans of lung imaging; Copyright: panthermedia.net / likstudio

Imaging: Deep-learning model for lung cancer

02.05.2019

A deep-learning model developed using serial image scans of tumors from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicted treatment response and survival outcomes better than standard clinical parameters.
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Image: Stetoscope on a medical document about ovarian cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Premium shots

Imaging: System helps to remove tiny ovarian tumors

01.05.2019

Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed only after it has reached an advanced stage, with many tumors spread throughout the abdomen. Most patients undergo surgery to remove as many of these tumors as possible, but because some are so small and widespread, it is difficult to eradicate all of them.
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Image: AI analyzes diabetic ratinopathy; Copyright: panthermedia.net / peshkova

mHealth: Smartphone AI detects diabetic retinopathy

01.05.2019

Researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center revealed that combining a smartphone-mounted device that takes high-quality retinal pictures with artificial intelligence software that reads them, can determine in real- time whether a patient should be referred to an ophthalmologist for follow-up.
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Image: Child suffering from cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / frantab

Software: Advanced radiation therapy for children

29.04.2019

Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles continue to lead the field of radiation oncology by pushing the leading edge of technological advances. A new report by Arthur Olch, PhD, highlights use of specialized software that could advance treatment accuracy for pediatric cancer patients.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23.04.2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08.04.2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01.04.2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01.03.2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Hybrid Imaging – Two Views of the Lungs

25.01.2019

CT scan, MRI or X-ray: All these methods allow doctors to see inside the body - including inside the lungs - and make a diagnosis. The clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the RWTH Aachen University Hospital uses a state-of-the-art gamma camera that combines SPECT and CT.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19.12.2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with MedicalTek Co., Ltd.

15.11.2018

Many diagnostic and treatment questions can be answered with a glance inside the body. At the MedicalTek stand at MEDICA 2018, we learn how imaging systems in minimally invasive surgery can help physicians.
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The Future of X-Ray – Interview with PROTEC

14.11.2018

Since Konrad Röntgen discovered X-rays in 1895, this type of diagnosis has been part of everyday hospital routine. But what innovations will there still be in this area of imaging methods in 2018? PROTEC gives us an insight into the fascinating world of X-rays at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: preview picture of the video

Diagnosis in HD – Imaging at MEDICA 2018

14.11.2018

Whether CT, MRT, X-rays or ultrasound – imaging methods provide insights into the human body and are irreplaceable for diagnostics. They are part of everyday hospital life since a long time, but what is currently happening in this field? We took a look – at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02.11.2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image:Lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/CLIPAREA

Lung Imaging – Keeping the Respiratory System Healthy

05.10.2018

Many people have damaged or suboptimally functioning lungs. An accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment are vital to protect this life-sustaining organ. Modern imaging solutions help physicians and patients understand what happens inside the lungs.
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Image: graphical steps of lung segmentation; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus/A. Braune

Lung segmentation: easier and faster thanks to new algorithms

01.10.2018

A look inside the lungs is a time-consuming process. To identify the boundaries of the respiratory organ from surrounding other organs, tissues, and structures requires between 200 and 500 computed tomographic images and subsequent manual markings – an elaborate process that can take up to six hours. An optimized computer program is now able to do this in only a few seconds.
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Image: diagnosis of the lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sergey Nivens

With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung

01.10.2018

Thanks to various imaging supplies, it is possible to make the inside of the body accessible for diagnostics, research and treatment. The lung, one of the most important human organs for survival, is also examined in this way. In our Topic of the Month, we looked at how doctors are getting a closer look at the lung, how the procedures differ, and which ones will be available in the near future.
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Image: Radiology assistant presses a button at the front of a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Lung cancer: Screening with low-Dose CT scans

01.10.2018

Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest cancers. The symptoms tend to be non-specific, often causing its detection to be too late. Currently, there is no comprehensive screening. This could change with the use of low-dose CT scans. It should be noted that this is not just an issue of technical feasibility. A screening test must also make sense from a health policy perspective.
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Image: Two physicians are looking at a model of a vascular system through 3D glasses; Copyright: Brainlab AG

Smart Hospital: How devices communicate in the OR

03.09.2018

In a Smart Hospital, all devices are designed to be connected and integrated, thus increasing efficiency and reducing time loss – at least, that is how things are meant to work in theory. In reality, there are still countless vendor-specific point solutions that cannot be integrated. That's why there is a need for solutions that bridge the gap between the different applications and formats.
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Image: Silhouette of a head with a hole in the middle shaped like a puzzle piece. The puzzle piece is lying next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

WAKE-UP study a wake-up call for acute stroke care

08.08.2018

Some solutions are simple, though not necessarily obvious. The WAKE-UP study, which included 70 participating European stroke centers, has now studied a relatively simple procedure to manage the acute care of stroke patients and avoid potential long-term effects. Best of all, it is available wherever MRI is offered.
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Image: A man is working at a computer that shows a model of the human liver; Copyright: Fraunhofer MEVIS

AI in medicine: Machines do not learn like humans

01.08.2018

For years, medicine has been exploring AI techniques aimed at easing physician workload. While computers may not have the medical expertise and skills obtained through years of study, they can recognize patterns and specific features in datasets and draw deductions.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23.07.2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22.06.2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Biomechanical measuring systems – motion and posture analysis in orthopedics

21.06.2018

Biomechanical measuring systems are used in orthopedics to diagnose and treat misalignments and diseases. The Velamed Company uses its high-tech solutions to measure biomechanical parameters that enable a holistic analysis of human movement and posture. We took a closer look at how this works.
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Ventricular fibrillation – Using ultrasound to detect its causes

17.05.2018

Ventricular fibrillation is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the heart muscle exhibits a rapid, erratic beat. The cause might be a circulatory system disease or heart attack. Researchers in Göttingen are now developing an ultrasound technique to get to the bottom of ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrhythmias and facilitate better treatment options.
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Image: Dr. Betsch next to a computer screen showing scans of the spine; Copyright: privat

Light and Bluetooth – dynamic measurement techniques for orthopedics

02.05.2018

X-rays for diagnostic imaging and therapy evaluation are still the norm in orthopedics. Meanwhile, patients who frequently need X-rays are repeatedly exposed to radiation. That's why the University Hospital RWTH Aachen uses and develops methods that are not just radiation-free but can also capture motions.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08.03.2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Surgical navigation systems – with precision to the destination

06.03.2018

With the help of surgical navigation systems, prostheses or implants can be better inserted. During the procedure, surgeons can see exactly where they need to operate on a screen. Just like a navigation system in the car, navigation in the OR guides you precisely to your destination. At the Uniklinik RWTH Aachen we can find out what advantages this has for physicians and patients.
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Image: Photograph of hands with hyperspectral imaging; Copyright: Diaspective Vision GmbH

Precision surgery thanks to informative hyperspectral imaging

08.02.2018

When body tissue is reconnected during a tumor operation in the gastrointestinal tract, surgeons need information about the current state of these so-called anastomoses. The new, non-invasive hyperspectral imaging technology now makes it possible to measure the crucial parameters during surgery and thereby increase surgical precision.
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Image: one of Fiagon's electromagnetic surgical navigation systems; Copyright: Fiagon

The surgeon's co-pilot: pin-point accuracy through electromagnetic navigation systems

04.01.2018

The position and alignment of surgical tools in the patient’s body must always be kept in view during the operation process to guarantee success and safety. With fine sensors at the tip of the instruments and an electromagnetic signal, Fiagon's electromagnetic navigation systems accurately reproduce their position in the body.
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Image: OR with very modern equipment; Copyright; Swen Reichhold

OR of the future: Surgical navigation systems and integrated devices

04.01.2018

While it is commonplace for operating room staff to work together as a team, the collaboration of operating room systems does not always work so well – many devices are still separated from one another, causing the OR processes to be prone to mistakes. The same applies to surgical navigation technologies that represent the interface between imaging, the surgeon and therapeutic devices.
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Image: Doctor with a laptop, around him various medical images, behind him an ECG; Copyright: panthermedia.net/realinemedia

Surgical navigation systems: Safely guiding the scalpel

04.01.2018

Imaging, navigation, integration – these are terms that describe the modern operating room. All of these components play a key role in accurate surgical procedures. They are integrated into surgical navigation systems, which make complicated medical surgeries considerably safer.
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Research and diagnostics – laboratory technology at MEDICA 2017

14.11.2017

Whether analysis, evaluation or preparation of samples – the laboratory is the core of every research institute. The work’s efficiency also depends to a large extent on the equipment and items. You can discover the latest trends and developments in laboratory technology at MEDICA 2017. See for yourself!
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MEDICA 2017: Cutting-edge, look into the future

13.11.2017

For exhibitors and visitors, MEDICA 2017 does not start until Monday. However, the trade press already gets a preview of some selected product highlights on the Sunday before the trade fair. We were there with the camera and met with some exhibitors. They gave us the opportunity to present cutting-edge products and to take a look at the medical technology of the future.
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Optical coherence tomography - Looking into the vessel with light

30.10.2017

The cardiology department at the Clinical Center Dortmund has used optical coherence tomography for many years. The technique can be used to examine the inside of the coronary arteries.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23.10.2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01.09.2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
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Image: Screen showing an image from cardiovascular angiography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fly_wish

Coronary heart disease: non-invasive imaging reduces catheter examinations

01.09.2017

Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause heart arrhythmia, heart insufficiency or heart attack. All the more important is an early, reliable diagnosis that helps to treat it and to reduce risk factors. But what is the best method for diagnosis? A recent study found that functional imaging methods can often spare patients the trouble and risks of a coronary angiography.
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Image: Colored sonographic image of the human heart from Doppler ultrasonography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Belish

Imaging techniques: ultrasound, MRI, CT, catheters and other procedures to keep a healthy heart

01.09.2017

Many people are affected by heart disease today because - among other reasons- our modern unhealthy lifestyle is taking a toll on our hearts. A reliable diagnosis and treatment are crucial for patients with heart disease since all other organs depend on the pumping of our vital organ. Modern imaging techniques are a key to understanding the heart.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22.08.2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Light microscope ChipScope - a glimpse into living cells

14.07.2017

A microscope that is only a few millimeters in size and that can help to consider cell changes in real time. This is the goal of the EU project ChipScope. Scientists led by Dr. Hutomo Wasisto in Braunschweig help to make this project come true.
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Image: A large medical device with a treatment couch and four movable boxes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Thomas Hecker

Cancer: refined treatment with proton minibeams

10.07.2017

Radiation therapies are an essential component of today’s oncology because they enable the treatment of localized tumors. Yet they have one major drawback: radiation damages not just tumor cells but also healthy tissue. One solution to solve this problem could be proton minibeam therapy, which uses finely focused beams.
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Image: A dermatology laser is used to remove a mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Krause

Laser surgery: usability, flexibility, treatment quality

03.07.2017

The scalpel is considered the classic surgical instrument and as such, has remained unchanged for quite some time. However, today’s technology opens up a world of new possibilities for cutting tissue. Next to high-frequency electrosurgical scalpels that work with electric power, surgeons also use a variety of different lasers. They promise great usability and better treatment.
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Image: An eye surgeon and an assistant are treating a patient with a surgical laser; Copyright: University Hospital Dresden/Felix Koopmann

Eye surgery: precision and prevention with femtosecond lasers

03.07.2017

Precision work is absolutely essential in eye surgery since the surgical site is very minute and sensitive. This is why eye surgeons have been using lasers for years. Femtosecond lasers are especially well suited to serve this purpose because they are able to cut tissue with great precision and little energy, which prevents unwanted side effects of surgery.
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Photochemical internalization – A new hope against bile duct cancer?

03.07.2017

Advanced bile duct tumors cannot always be removed surgically. Then, patients receive chemotherapy and a stent that corrects the narrowing of the bile duct that is caused by the tumor. Another, local therapy option is tested at the University Hospital Frankfurt: laser light is used to transport drugs into the tumor during photochemical internalization.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24.04.2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Radiology – How an MRI machine makes its way into an office

13.04.2017

These days, medical imaging is one of the key diagnostic methods. But how do large medical devices actually get to their final destination? MEDICA-tradefair.com took its camera along to observe the remodeling of a radiology imaging office. The leading actors: a CT scanner and an MRI machine.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03.04.2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: Children playing outside, getting wet in the water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Pneumonia in Children: Ultrasound or X-Rays?

08.03.2017

Pneumonia is the most frequent respiratory disease in children and can even cause death. That is why it is extremely important to make an accurate diagnosis as quickly as possible. If this requires imaging tests, normally X-rays are taken. But there is an alternative: ultrasound.
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