Interviews 2017 -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: ink is applied to a carrier plate with a 3D-Printer; Copyright: Empa

3D-Printing: Wood on our Skin

09.10.2019

Physiological parameters in our blood can be determined without painful punctures. Empa researchers are currently working with a Canadian team to develop flexible, biocompatible nanocellulose sensors that can be attached to the skin. The 3D-printed analytic chips made of renewable raw materials will even be biodegradable in future.
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Image: a 3d-printer at work; Copyright: panthermedia.net / prescott10

3D printing: new technique for biomaterials

03.10.2019

A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. Developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, the technique could be used to print soft biomaterials that could be used to repair defects in the body.
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Image: Displacement comparison at the end-systolic frame and final frame; Copyright: WMG University of Warwick

Imaging: new MRI technique spots scar heart muscles

30.08.2019

Traditional MRI scans use the metal gadolinium, which resonates areas of the heart muscles that are not functioning efficiently, however gadolinium affect the Kidney function. The new 3D MRI computing technique calculates strain in heart muscles showing which muscles are not functioning enough without damaging other organs - researchers at WMG, University of Warwick have found.
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Image: Tissue engeneering – mouse pulmonary artery model; Copyright: Alain Herzog / 2019 EPFL

Tissue Engeneering: bioprinting complex living tissue

26.08.2019

Tissue engineers create artificial organs and tissues that can be used to develop and test new drugs, repair damaged tissue and even replace entire organs in the human body. However, current fabrication methods limit their ability to produce free-form shapes and achieve high cell viability.
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Image: A researcher displays the pliability of a trileaf heart valve bioprinted in collagen.; Copyright: Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering

Tissue engineering: 3D printing the human heart

05.08.2019

A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University has published a paper in Science that details a new technique allowing anyone to 3D bioprint tissue scaffolds out of collagen, the major structural protein in the human body. This first-of-its-kind method brings the field of tissue engineering one step closer to being able to 3D print a full-sized, adult human heart.
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Image: human torso simulator; Copyright: Lancaster University

Medical back supports: human torso simulator offers promise for back brace

02.08.2019

Engineers have for the first time created a simulator mimicking the mechanical behaviour of the human torso - which could lead to innovations in the design of medical back supports. It allows researchers to test different back brace designs and configurations without needing to test them on people - removing significant logistical and ethical issues.
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Image: Bacteria in the gut are pulled into the helical channels by an osmotic 'pump' in the pill.; Copyright: Nano Lab, Tufts University

Diagnostics: 3D-printed pill samples aid diagnosis and treatment

29.07.2019

The pill is the first known working device capable of non-invasively and accurately assessing the profile of bacterial species inhabiting any stage of the gastrointestinal tract. The ability to profile bacterial species inhabiting the gut could have important implications for conditions that affect and are affected by the intestinal microbiome.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23.04.2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Health-i Award: The best ideas for the health of tomorrow

15.11.2017

The digitalisation of the health care system is making great strides forward. In order to give further impetus to this trend, the Health-i Award brings together experts from business, science and health. In the MEDICA ECON FORUM by TK three promising start-ups were presented.
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Image: Surgeon is working at a simulator of the human back with two instruments; Copyright: HTWK Leipzig/Rebecca Schweier

RealSpine: realistic surgical simulation

22.02.2017

Surgeons need a great sense of touch. They first have to acquire this skill in simulation training before they can perform surgery on actual patients. Having said that, simulators are not just meant to teach the right movements; ideally, they should also provide a true-to-life experience of the surgical field – as is the case in RealSpine surgical training.
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