Current interviews -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: elderly man with cane on a sofa.; Copyright: PantherMedia  / AndrewLozovyi

AI-powered computer model predicts disease progression during aging

08/12/2021

Using artificial intelligence, a team of University at Buffalo researchers has developed a novel system that models the progression of chronic diseases as patients age.
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Image: Optical inspection of a balloon catheter; Copyright: BVMED

Battling myocardial infarction with drug-coated balloon catheters

02/12/2021

A drug-coated balloon catheter inserted in minimally invasive cardiac surgery is increasingly serving as a replacement for the risky stent treatment. In current practice, the balloons are often coated manually. A new device is intended to automate this time-consuming procedure. Along with partners, a team from the Fraunhofer IPK is developing a prototype of such a device.
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Image: Illustration of an AI with human heart; Copyright: PantherMedia  / sdecoret

Artificial intelligence–based method predicts risk of atrial fibrillation

19/11/2021

Atrial fibrillation—an irregular and often rapid heart rate—is a common condition that often leads to the formation of clots in the heart that can travel to the brain to cause a stroke. A researchers team has developed an artificial intelligence–based method for identifying patients who are at risk for developing atrial fibrillation and could therefore benefit from preventative measures.
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Image: Biological heart valve with metal scaffold; Copyright: Fraunhofer IKTS

Preventing calcification of bioprosthetic heart valves

03/11/2021

A defective heart valve is the second most common form of heart disease. Most cases involve a narrowed aortic valve, but often the mitral valve can also be affected. Prostheses significantly increase the life expectancy of those with the disease. While bioprosthetic heart valves have some advantages over mechanical ones, they can become calcified relatively quickly.
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Image: Researchers at Icahn School of Medicine developed an electrocardiogram-reading algorithm that can detect subtle signs of heart failure; Copyright: Glicksberg and Nadkarni labs

Scientists show how AI may spot unseen signs of heart failure

19/10/2021

A special artificial intelligence (AI)-based computer algorithm created by Mount Sinai researchers was able to learn how to identify subtle changes in electrocardiograms (also known as ECGs or EKGs) to predict whether a patient was experiencing heart failure.
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Image: a woman on an OR table; Copyright: PantherMedia/ArturVerkhovetskiy

Identifying risks before surgery - with simple means

08/10/2021

Risks during surgery, especially cardiological risks, are still very high in the Western world. However, conventional methods for measuring such risks before surgery are costly or even not always meaningful. And increasing economization in hospitals also makes it more difficult for staff to find time for a comprehensive pre-op analysis.
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Image: A man in a blue shirt is sitting at his desks and performs stretching exercises; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andriy Pipov

Everyday physical activity: out of shape thanks to the Corona pandemic?

22/09/2021

Social distancing, working from home, limited social activities: the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted many people to become more inactive, sedentary, and therefore more susceptible to ailments. Simple fitness programs and regular exercises can help counteract the negative effects of inertness. And paradoxical as it may sound, the pandemic also gives us the chance to get moving again.
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Image: SFU School of mechatronic systems engineering’s associate Professor Woo Soo Kim Holds the 3D-Printed Portable Ventilator; Copyright: Simon Fraser University

Technology takes the art of origami into the fight against COVID-19

13/09/2021

3D-printed origami technology at the heart of low-cost, portable ventilators aimed at improving pandemic treatment and revolutionizing healthcare delivery.
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Image: Blood vessels and nerve tracts of a mouse; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

SWIR Imaging: The Power of Multi-Color Real-Time Technology

02/08/2021

Image-guided surgery is based on medical imaging. However, past imaging technologies performed while the patient is awake cannot deliver a complete view that facilitates a visual differentiation of structures such as blood vessels and nerve tracts. In a study, scientists developed a non-invasive imaging modality that enables multiplexing, deep tissue penetration, and real-time resolution.
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Image: A surgeon points at a screen that shows a roughly round shape; Copyright: PantherMedia/pitchayanank.hotmail.com

Medical imaging: obtaining an accurate view of blood vessels for surgery

02/08/2021

Surgical intervention is often inevitable when blood vessels become narrowed, blocked, or damaged. Surgeons use stents and medical balloons to open and widen the arteries, suck out the obstructing clots and use a catheter to examine the vessels. Intraoperative cardiovascular imaging is an essential tool to guide the catheters and instruments during the minimally invasive procedures.
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Image: X-ray image of a blood vessel with a catheter and a balloon; Copyright: PantherMedia/pitchayanank.hotmail.com

A look into the cardiovascular system: Possibilities of medical imaging

02/08/2021

A high degree of precision is required for operations involving the cardiovascular system. This is based on medical imaging. In practice, however, these still face a number of challenges that can impair image quality. The further development of imaging techniques represents a forward-looking field of research in order to be able to improve surgical treatment.
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Image: A surgeon is inserting a catheter into a blood vessel of a patient; Copyright: PantherMedia/chanawit

Atrial fibrillation: better outcomes with diamonds

15/12/2020

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots and trigger strokes. To correct the condition, physicians use medication or surgical intervention by means of catheter ablation. This surgical method on the beating heart is a standard and safe procedure but there is always room for improvement.
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Image: Ambulance on the road; Copyright: PantherMedia / inhabitant

Mobile stroke units: improved outcomes for ischemic stroke

02/06/2020

If someone is having a stroke, you call an ambulance. But getting to the hospital can be time-consuming. To prevent long-term disabilities and death, patients need to be treated as quickly as possible. According to a recent study by the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, mobile stroke units play a key role in this setting.
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02/06/2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Stroke care: When every minute counts

02/06/2020

Stroke can affect anyone – older as well as younger people. The minutes after the stroke determine whether disability or death is the result. Only if acute care, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation are carried out in a targeted and effective manner, the chances are greater that only minor damage remains or that impairments even recede.
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Image: Smiling man is standing in nature with one had at his ear; Copyright: panthermedia.net/cristalov

In-ear sensors for monitoring vital parameters

22/04/2020

Wearables offer practical solutions for the flexible measurement of data. The sensor from cosinuss° is worn directly in the ear and offers a precise monitoring of vital parameters.
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Image: A device with a large monitor and different control panels in a darkened laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA – PAMB

Cardiovascular diseases: using AI to navigate the catheter

09/03/2020

Treatment of a heart attack or stroke caused by vascular occlusion must be prompt to prevent further damage to vital tissue. Unfortunately, the actual treatment is often preceded by a lengthy catheter-based procedure where the cardiologist manually guides the catheter to the affected vessel. AI might perform this task in the future.
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Image: Heart symbols are floating over a smartphone in the hand of a physician; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thodonal

Digital cardiology: analyzing data beat by beat

03/02/2020

Chronic cardiovascular diseases are a growing burden worldwide. Most of them are diseases of civilization that spread, where lifestyle is improving or where it is good already. But the healthcare systems are not growing equally to keep up with this development. We can make up for this by making cardiological care smarter with eHealth and mHealth.
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Image: person holding hand to the heart with a graphic depiction of a heart in front of them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/suriyaphoto

Cardisiography: A Non-Invasive Heart Screening Test

03/02/2020

Coronary heart disease can come as a complete surprise and occur suddenly. Cardisiography was designed to lower the risk and make faster intervention possible. As a non-invasive heart screening test, cardisiography offers the possibility of early detection for heart diseases.
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Image: Colorful cubes with heart symbols are floating over a smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thodonal

Cardiology: digital solutions support those coping with chronic illness

03/02/2020

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide, taking an estimated 17.9 million lives each year. Acute events such as heart attacks and strokes stand out in this setting. Chronic heart diseases can also be a debilitating condition for many patients. If cardiology uses digital methods and tools, it can reach more affected people.
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Image: Two screens with picture of the circulatory system in a catheter laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

MEDICA TECH FORUM: light-based imaging technique OCT

04/11/2019

Since its inception, MEDICA TECH FORUM has focused on the implementation of innovations and new technologies into clinical practice. 2019 marks the tenth year of the Forum. In honor of its anniversary, we will brighten things up a bit, as one of the focal points will highlight how optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light to produce images.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01/07/2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08/04/2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: Silhouette of a head with a hole in the middle shaped like a puzzle piece. The puzzle piece is lying next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

WAKE-UP study a wake-up call for acute stroke care

08/08/2018

Some solutions are simple, though not necessarily obvious. The WAKE-UP study, which included 70 participating European stroke centers, has now studied a relatively simple procedure to manage the acute care of stroke patients and avoid potential long-term effects. Best of all, it is available wherever MRI is offered.
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Ventricular fibrillation – Using ultrasound to detect its causes

17/05/2018

Ventricular fibrillation is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the heart muscle exhibits a rapid, erratic beat. The cause might be a circulatory system disease or heart attack. Researchers in Göttingen are now developing an ultrasound technique to get to the bottom of ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrhythmias and facilitate better treatment options.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: Man with stethoscope and medical symbols; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Between austerity measures and growth pressure - Latin America's medical market

03/04/2018

A region whose states make up the world's third largest economy and which has few linguistic differences - Latin America is an attractive market for foreign companies at first glance. This also applies to the medical market. However, various factors are contributing to the fact that this market is growing only slowly in most countries.
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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