Current interviews -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Scientist pipettes a DNA sample into a tube; Copyright: westend61

westend61

Cancers and heart disease could be diagnosed more easily with new rapid test

12/08/2022

Imperial researchers have built a new easy-to-use test that could diagnose non-infectious diseases like heart attacks and cancers more quickly.
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Image: Person in the laboratory holding cell samples under a microscope; Copyright: MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

Molecular markers: predicting the most effective treatment for IBD

09/08/2022

Early effective treatment can help manage this condition and improve the quality of life of patients. A research project aims to identify molecular markers to better assess the chances of success of certain biological therapies and subsequently determine the best individualized treatment plan.
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Image: A woman wears a dark blue textile vest with surveillance sensors; Copyright: Fraunhofer

Fraunhofer

High-tech vest monitors lung function

09/08/2022

Patients with severe respiratory or lung diseases require intensive treatment and their lung function needs to be monitored on a continuous basis. As part of the Pneumo.Vest project, Fraunhofer researchers have developed a technology whereby noises in the lungs are recorded using a textile vest with integrated acoustic sensors.
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Image: An example of analysis using deep learning. The AI suggested that the red area is idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and blue area is non-idiopathic pulmonary; Copyright: Tosei General Hospital, Rei

Tosei General Hospital, Reiko Matsushita

AI performs as well as medical specialists in analyzing lung disease

05/08/2022

A Nagoya University research group has developed an AI algorithm that accurately and quickly diagnoses idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a lung disease. The algorithm makes its diagnosis based only on information from non-invasive examinations, including lung images and medical information collected during daily medical care.
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Image: Illustration of cells and transfection variants; Copyright: Dr. Holger Erfle, University of Heidelberg, BIOQUANT

Dr. Holger Erfle, University of Heidelberg, BIOQUANT

Cell-protecting transfection of proteins and other macromolecules into living cells

04/08/2022

"Top-fase" is a simple and universal tool for the targeted transfection of numerous molecule species into cells and cell lines.
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Image: Two hands shaking; Copyright: rawpixel

rawpixel

Weak handgrip strength may signal serious health issues

02/08/2022

Muscle strength is a powerful predictor of mortality that can quickly and inexpensively be assessed by measuring handgrip strength. In a new study, researchers developed cut-off points that apply to the general population, while also considering the correlation of handgrip strength with gender, body height, and aging to be used in medical practice.
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Image: Two smiling men sitting in an inner courtyard - Klaus Gerwert and Léon Beyer; Copyright: RUB/Marquard

RUB/Marquard

Sensor: early Alzheimer’s detection up to 17 years in advance

01/08/2022

The dementia disorder Alzheimer’s disease has a symptom-free course of 15 to 20 years before the first clinical symptoms emerge. Using an immuno-infrared sensor developed in Bochum, a research team is able to identify signs of Alzheimer’s disease in the blood up to 17 years before the first clinical symptoms appear.
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Image: A man with brown skin and curly black hair receives a nose swab; Copyright: Prostock-Studio

Prostock-Studio

New COVID-19 rapid-test performs PCR faster than similar tests

29/07/2022

Researchers at Columbia Engineering and Rover Diagnostics team up to develop a low-cost, portable platform that gives RT-PCR results in 23 minutes that match laboratory-based tests.
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Image: A drone in front of a city landscape with skyscrapers; Copyright: IZF

IZF

Are drones the optimal way to distribute COVID-19 tests?

29/07/2022

Researchers are looking into drone delivery as a method to efficiently deliver testing kits while limiting contact between individuals.
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Image: A person measures the glucose level using an app; Copyright: microgen

microgen

'Smart necklace' biosensor may track health status through sweat

28/07/2022

Researchers have successfully tested a device that may one day use the chemical biomarkers in sweat to detect changes in a person’s health.
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Image: Micrograph of drying patterns of peptide solutions; Copyright: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Peptide "fingerprint" enables earlier diagnosis of alzheimer’s disease

28/07/2022

Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease are caused by folding errors (misfolding) in proteins or peptides, i.e. by changes in their spatial structure.
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Image: A man in a white coat speaking to a woman in black t-shirt and demonstrates his biosensor; Copyright: Chris Meyer, Indiana University

Chris Meyer, Indiana University

Fast, efficient COVID-19 biosensor under development

27/07/2022

Researchers are improving technology to test for the coronavirus at a 'population scale' in order to stay on top of shifting variants.
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Image: Illustration of a human head an the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation; Copyright: Alexandre Azinheira, Champalimaud Foundation.

Alexandre Azinheira, Champalimaud Foundation.

Brain stimulation as an antidepressant treatment for older adults

25/07/2022

New study from the Champalimaud Foundation’s Neuropsychiatry Unit casts doubt on long-held but controversial belief that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may not be suitable treatment for depression in older adults.
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Image: surgical team of three people around a cardiac surgeon in an operating room looking at an echocardiogram on a screen; Copyright: westend 61

westend61

Is it a heart attack or something else? How artificial intelligence can support diagnostics

22/07/2022

Chest pain, shortness of breath, a brief loss of consciousness – warning signs that suggest a heart attack. But it might also be Takotsubo syndrome, also known as stress cardiomyopathy or broken heart syndrome with symptoms that resemble a heart attack. Yet it is of utmost importance to differentiate between the two conditions to initiate the right treatment.
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Image: Empty laboratory tubes for diagnosis of coronavirus disease; Copyright: rawf8

rawf8

Skins swabs could be how we test for Covid-19 in the future

22/07/2022

Skin swabs are "surprisingly effective" at identifying Covid-19 infection,according to new research from the University of Surrey, offering a route to a non-invasive future for Covid-19 testing.
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Image: iHandUApp on a smartphone shows medical statistical data; Copyright: INESC Brussels HUB

INESC Brussels HUB

Wearable system tracks Parkinson’s Disease symptoms remotely

22/07/2022

Parkinson’s Disease affects 10 million people worldwide and its symptoms include tremors in the fingers and hands, small handwriting, loss of smell, walking difficulties, dizziness, and others. As these symptoms worsen over time, monitoring and treating PD is crucial to preserve the patients’ autonomy and enhance their quality of life.
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Image: A side by side comparison of moles on a patient's back (right) and the same moles as star-like targets in the astronomical software used by the MoleGazer ; Copyright: The MoleGazer Team

The MoleGazer Team

MoleGazer: Applying astronomy ideas to mole identification

21/07/2022

Scientists are applying astronomical techniques to identify moles that may develop into the skin cancer melanoma. Astronomers regularly take images of the sky, producing software to map set targets over time. This technology is now being adapted to monitor the evolution of moles in high-risk patients.
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Image: An image composed of colorful dots that form an arc; Copyright: abberior Instruments

abberior Instruments

Neurology: molecular map of the synapse

19/07/2022

Scientists at the Institute for Auditory Neuroscience, UMG, the Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences and the abberior Instruments GmbH apply high-resolution 3D-MINFLUX technology for precise 3D representation of the molecular organization in the active zone of rod photoreceptor cells.
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Image: Two men and two women in white coats pose for the camera; Copyright: The University of Hong Kong

The University of Hong Kong

Non-invasive stimulation of the eye for depression and dementia

18/07/2022

A joint research team from the LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) and City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has discovered that the electrical stimulation of the eye surface can alleviate depression-like symptoms and improve cognitive function in animal models.
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Image: Doctor shows elderly patient with dementia geometric shape game; Copyright: davidpereiras

davidpereiras

Could a computer diagnose Alzheimer’s disease and dementia?

15/07/2022

Boston University researchers develop an artificial intelligence program that detects cognitive impairment accurately and efficiently from voice recordings.
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Image: A smiling man in a lightish shirt is standing in a computer lab with students – Prof. Daniel Rückert; Copyright: Juli Eberle/TUM

Juli Eberle/TUM

New digital medicine and health center in Munich

12/07/2022

The Zentrum für Digitale Medizin und Gesundheit (ZDMG) will bring together researchers in medicine, informatics and mathematics. They will collaborate on new healthcare developments based on data science and artificial intelligence and pursue clinical applications.
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Image: Chip with adipose tissue is held in place by hands in purple disposable gloves; Copyright: Berthold Steinhilber

Berthold Steinhilber

Ex vivo obesity research thanks to the adipose-on-chip system

08/07/2022

Ex vivo studies of human obesity without animal testing? The Adipose-on-Chip system offers a solution that allows scientists to gain better insights into various obesity-linked secondary diseases and comorbidities in the future.
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Image: A doctor performs an ultrasound diagnosis on a patient; Copyright: Natabuena

Natabuena

Kiel assistant physician awarded Else Kröner Memorial Fellowship

07/07/2022

In the funded project, Dr. Florian Tran, clinician scientist at the Cluster of Excellence PMI, plans to use a new technology to detect individual signatures in intestinal tissue.
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Image: Visualization of a miRNA expression using DNA computing and nanopore decoding; Copyright: Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

Detection of cancer biomarkers using nanopore-based DNA computing technology

05/07/2022

Cholangiocarcinoma, also known as bile duct cancer, is a cancer type with a characteristically high mortality. At the time of diagnosis, most bile duct cancers are typically already incurable. This is why methods for the early diagnosis of bile duct cancer are urgently needed.
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Image: A man is holding to sample vials with a liquid that is glowing yellow, green and red in a darkened room; Copyright: Fraunhofer IAP

Fraunhofer IAP

Breast cancer: quick and gentle diagnosis through liquid biopsy

05/07/2022

If breast cancer is suspected, doctors carry out a biopsy. However, this is invasive, painful and costly. It also takes several days to get the results. In the future, diagnosis could be made via a liquid biopsy of a patient’s blood — a gentle, cost-effective method that would deliver the results within just a few hours.
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Image: Yujin Hoshida poses for the camera; Copyright: UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Blood test to predict liver cancer risk

04/07/2022

Protein levels in blood samples of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease reveal those at highest risk who should be screened regularly for liver cancer.
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Image: A laboratory worker performs a blood test; Copyright: seventyfourimages

seventyfourimages

Dementia: Blood levels could point to early loss of neuronal connections

01/07/2022

Researchers from DZNE and Ulm University Hospital have identified a protein in the blood that may indicate the degradation of neural connections years before the onset of dementia symptoms.
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Image: An app on a smartphone shows how the deep learning tool identifies diseases via the eye; Copyright: Sharma et al.

Sharma et al.

Deep learning model helps automated screening of common eye disorders

30/06/2022

A new deep learning (DL) model that can identify disease-related features from images of eyes has been unveiled by a group of Tohoku University researchers. This 'lightweight' DL model can be trained with a small number of images, even ones with a high-degree of noise, and is resource-efficient, meaning it is deployable on mobile devices.
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Image: A man undergoes an X-ray examination, a doctor looks at the result of the bone density scan; Copyright: Getty

Getty

Quick, easy scan can reveal late-life dementia risk

30/06/2022

A long-term study has shown a common bone density scan can also show calcified plaque build-up in the abdominal aorta - revealing if someone is at increased risk of developing dementia.
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Image: Blut sample in a test tube; Copyright: gpointstudio

gpointstudio

New blood biomarker identified for status of fatty liver disease

29/06/2022

A MedUni Vienna study team has identified the role of a specific subtype of macrophages (white blood cells) in progressive non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Image: Doctor checks an elderly gentleman's eye health with a beam of light; Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

New hope for a therapy against retinitis pigmentosa

27/06/2022

Retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative genetic disease of the eye, is characterized by progressive vision loss, usually leading to blindness.
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Image: A nurse takes care of a person with parkinson; Copyright: bialasiewicz

bialasiewicz

Prospect of blood test for Parkinson’s disease for the first time

24/06/2022

A research team at the Faculty of Medicine at Kiel University has developed a method that reliably detects protein changes in blood that are typical of Parkinson's disease.
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Image: Man during a neurological examination ; Copyright: engagestock

engagestock

Protein changes in the liquor indicate inflammatory processes in the brain

23/06/2022

Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases are associated with inflammatory processes in the brain. German researchers have succeeded in identifying a group of proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid that could provide information about such inflammatory processes.
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Image: Radiologists look at brain scans ; Copyright: imagesourcecurated

imagesourcecurated

Single brain scan can diagnose Alzheimer’s disease

22/06/2022

A single MRI scan of the brain could be enough to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research by Imperial College London.
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Image: Newborn baby in the hospital bed; Copyright: Image-Source

Image-Source

Rapid whole genome sequencing improves diagnosis in critically ill infants

21/06/2022

Children who are born severely ill or who develop serious illness in the first few weeks of life are often difficult to diagnose, with considerable implications for their short and longer-term care.
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Image: Empty laboratory tubes for diagnosis of coronavirus disease; Copyright: rawf8

rawf8

Rapid test to measure immunity to COVID-19

17/06/2022

New blood assay provides critical information for revaccination strategies in vulnerable individuals.
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Image: A smiling man is sitting behind a laboratory device; Copyright: Universität Bielefeld/M.-D. Müller

Universität Bielefeld/M.-D. Müller

Making drug interactions in the liver visible

15/06/2022

Bielefeld University is coordinating a new EU-research project that seeks to produce microscopic liver tissue cultures that can survive for 14 days, while also using imaging methods to investigate how liver cells react to combinations of different medications.
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Image: A computer screen with lines of programming code on it; Copyright: Howell Leung/Leibniz-HKI

Howell Leung/Leibniz-HKI

Liver: The gut microbiome as a health compass

15/06/2022

The human microbiome can provide information regarding the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This has been discovered by an international team led by the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans Knöll Institute.
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Image: A hand is holding an object tray with the word “coronavirus” on it in front of a microscope and a screen; Copyright: mstandret

mstandret

Identifying viruses more quickly

14/06/2022

The research project NanoXCAN involving Leibniz Universität Hannover aims to revolutionize virus imaging technology. The European Commission is funding the project with around 4 million euros. Every hospital could benefit, as a rapid and reliable identification of viral subtypes can save lives.
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Image: Blue-and-violet image of a blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized medicine: Treatment of acute stroke

14/06/2022

A blood clot in the brain that blocks the supply of oxygen can cause an acute stroke. In this case, every minute counts. A team from Empa, the University Hospital in Geneva and the Hirslanden Clinic is currently developing a diagnostic procedure that can be used to start a tailored therapy in a timely manner, as they write in Scientific Reports.
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Image: Man in a suit and glasses poses for the camera; Copyright: Klaus Nagels

Klaus Nagels

Precise blood diagnostics improve treatment outcome for lung cancer

10/06/2022

Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a particularly aggressive type of lung cancer. Tumor cells and tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the blood of patients with the disease can be analyzed by means of liquid biopsy throughout the course of the disease.
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Image: Close-up of a newborn baby; Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

Genetic testing for neonatal epilepsy allows babies to go home sooner

09/06/2022

Genetic testing results in lower length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for infants with epilepsy, according to a study published in the journal Pediatric Neurology.
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Image: Colored cells that are marked with arrows; Copyright: Paula Heinke

Paula Heinke

Your liver is just under three years old

07/06/2022

The liver has a unique ability to regenerate after damage. However, it was unknown whether this ability decreases as we age. International scientists led by Dr. Olaf Bergmann at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden used a technique known as retrospective radiocarbon birth dating to determine the age of the human liver.
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Image: Drawing of a liver that is connected to a magnifying glass by colorful circles; Copyright: Lili Niu © Novo Nordisk Foundation, Center for Protein Research

Lili Niu © Novo Nordisk Foundation, Center for Protein Research

Early diagnosis of liver diseases by proteomics

06/06/2022

Two or three drinks every day could put your liver in danger. Using proteomics and machine learning, researchers now present a revolutionary tool to predict whether an individual has alcohol-related liver disease and if an individual patient is at risk of disease progression.
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Image: Portrait of a asian male in a lab coat - Tony Hu; Copyright: Sally Asher, Tulane University

Sally Asher, Tulane University

Tuberculosis: New blood test helps with diagnosis

03/06/2022

Researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine have developed a new highly sensitive blood test for tuberculosis (TB) that screens for DNA fragments of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria that causes the deadly disease.
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Image: smiling man in a suit in front of a MRI machine - Prof Andrew Jabbour; Copyright: Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Virtual biopsy set to transform heart transplant care

02/06/2022

The days of heart transplant survivors undergoing invasive biopsies could soon be over after a new MRI technique has proven to be safe and effective; reducing complications and hospital admissions.
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Image: different colored pills and a stethoscope on a cardiogram; Copyright: DragonImages

DragonImages

Researchers find new approach to treating cardiovascular diseases

02/06/2022

A specific protein in blood vessel cells plays a major role in the development of vascular and cardiovascular diseases: The presence of too many "thromboxane A2 receptors" hinders the formation of new blood vessels. A research team led by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) was able to describe the underlying process for the first time.
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Image: Two men are talking in front of a laptop; Copyright: LipiTUM

LipiTUM

Same symptom – different cause?

01/06/2022

Machine learning is playing an ever-increasing role in biomedical research. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed a new method of using molecular data to extract subtypes of illnesses. In the future, this method can help to support the study of larger patient groups.
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Image: Researcher doing lab tests on white blood cell samples; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

Magnetic device isolates rarest white blood cells

27/05/2022

Across the world, food allergies are on the rise. One of the most important cells in studying this ailment are basophils, which activate inflammation and other responses to allergens such as rashes, and sometimes, anaphylaxis.
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Image: elderly man holding his chest in pain; Copyright: anontae2522

anontae2522

Speech analysis app predicts worsening heart failure before symptom onset

25/05/2022

A voice analysis app used by heart failure patients at home recognises fluid in the lungs three weeks before an unplanned hospitalisation or escalation in outpatient drug treatment.
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Image: Three man in suits pose in front of the camera; Copyright: private

private

Nephrolytix aims to detect acute kidney injury ten times faster

25/05/2022

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly seen in hospitals. It entails the rapid deterioration of kidney function, a high disease burden, and leads in some cases to death. The team at Nephrolytix GmbH, a new spin-off of Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, has developed a process with the potential to reduce the time it takes to detect AKI – currently 48 to 72 hours – by 90 percent.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Sonography training – Inexpensive models from the 3D printer

23/05/2022

Many medical disciplines rely on the tenet "Practice makes perfect". Sonography diagnostics is one of them. Unfortunately, constant training can be difficult, as patients with specific diseases are not present at a hospital all the time. The University Hospital Bonn is creating a solution for this problem: 3D printed models of joints and arteries are used in training.
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Image: Locus coeruleus as observed in a 7T MRI scanner ; Copyright: University of Cambridge

University of Cambridge

Brain scanners: Hope for treating cognitive symptoms in Parkinson’s

23/05/2022

Ultra-powerful 7T MRI scanners could be used to help identify those patients with Parkinson’s disease and similar conditions most likely to benefit from new treatments for previously-untreatable symptoms, say scientists.
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Image: Electron micrograph of Staphylococcus aureus; Copyright: HZI/Manfred Rohde

HZI/Manfred Rohde

A bright spot for microbiological diagnostics

19/05/2022

HZI researchers develop molecular probes to detect pathogens in clinical samples.
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Image: A woman in the bathroom is holding her stomach because of pain; Copyright: gpointstudio

gpointstudio

Nanosensor platform could advance detection of ovarian cancer

18/05/2022

Lehigh University researchers, part of multi-institution team, use the fluorescence of carbon nanotubes and machine learning to create a ‘spectral fingerprint’ of a hard-to-diagnose cancer.
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Image: A woman is pushed into an MRI; Copyright: Wavebreakmedia

Wavebreakmedia

Hyperpolarized nuclear MR: more precise diagnoses and personalized therapies

17/05/2022

Hyperpolarized nuclear magnetic resonance enables major medical advances in molecular diagnostics, for example for cardiovascular diseases or cancer therapy. Within the framework of the EU collaborative project "MetaboliQs", seven partners developed a microscopy method which enables the analysis of metabolic processes at the single cell level by means of diamond-based hyperpolarization.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02/12/2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04/11/2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: A physician is standing in front of a floating image of the brain and is touching one point; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Igor Vetushko

Medicine 5.0: machine learning algorithms in healthcare

04/11/2019

Artificial intelligence holds the promise of salvation when it comes to medicine: it is meant to unburden medical professionals, save time and money and perform tasks reliably and tirelessly. But before AI algorithms are allowed to diagnose diseases, many technical and ethical questions still need answers.
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Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04/11/2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
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Image: two athletes at the startline for a race; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

Sports Hub project changes sports medicine with big data and AI

22/10/2019

Professor Jarek Krajewski sat down for a MEDICA interview and delivered a detailed description of the Sports Hub project. It highlights how big data and AI transform the world of sports medicine. The project delivers new insights and provides a versatile database.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01/10/2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01/10/2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
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Image: Connection of medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019: Experience tomorrow's innovations today

01/10/2019

The medical market is booming - medical ideas and visions for the future are more in demand than ever. Especially at MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019 young founders want to present their product innovations. Develop business contacts, meet investors and experience an international environment in just one place. Discover in our Topic of the Month what makes MEDICA START-UP PARK unique.
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Image: A biker is riding on rocky ground in a steppe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Daxiao Productions

panthermedia.net/Daxiao Productions

Triathlete Sebastian Kienle: wearables and body awareness improve athletic performance

09/09/2019

A 2.4-mile (3.86 km) swim, a 112-mile (180.25 km) bicycle ride and a marathon 26.22-mile (42.20 km) run – that’s the Ironman Triathlon. Triathletes like Sebastian Kienle are constantly working to push beyond their limits. At the 7th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE on November 20 - 21, you can meet Kienle in person.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02/09/2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22/08/2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01/08/2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01/08/2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08/07/2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01/07/2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01/07/2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01/07/2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01/07/2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23/04/2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01/04/2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01/03/2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01/03/2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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