Current Background Reports -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Brown cancer cells with other blue cell types in a schematic depiction; Copyright: Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine

Radiotherapy: breaking the stroma barrier

22.10.2019

Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Patients with pancreatic cancer often receive chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which are not always effective and can have toxic side effects. The method may offer an effective treatment for pancreatic cancer with fewer side effects in surrounding organs.
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Image: a man with an oxygen mask lying in bed; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ kasto

Cancer therapy: Oxygen in hyperbaric chamber provides relief

15.10.2019

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can relieve self-reported symptoms and side-effects of radiotherapy against cancer in the pelvic region, a study shows. After 30–40 sessions in a hyperbaric chamber, many patients experienced reductions in bleeding, urinary incontinence, and pain alike.
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Image: Traumatic Microbleeds in the Brain; Copyright: Image courtesy of Latour Lab/NINDS

Imaging: new information regarding traumatic microbleeds

14.10.2019

Using advanced imaging, researchers have uncovered new information regarding traumatic microbleeds, which appear as small, dark lesions on MRI scans after head injury but are typically too small to be detected on CT scans.
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Image: a speaker in front of an audience; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ kasto

AI: machine learning and cancer care explored in Cleveland

14.10.2019

Artificial Intelligence (AI), machine learning and smart computing are all rapidly transforming the global health and medical landscape, including at Case Western Reserve University and among its health-care partners in Northeast Ohio and beyond.
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Image: blood vessels; Copyright: ETH Zurich / Daniel Razansky

AI: machine learning improves biomedical imaging

04.10.2019

Scientists at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have used machine learning methods to improve optoacoustic imaging. This relatively young medical imaging technique can be used for applications such as visualizing blood vessels, studying brain activity, characterizing skin lesions and diagnosing breast cancer.
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Image: Illustration of a person in whose heart a beam and several particles are guided; Copyright: Mindy Takamiya

X-rays: safer, more effective cancer radiation therapy using nanoparticles

02.10.2019

An element called gadolinium delivered into cancer cells releases killer electrons when hit by specially tuned X-rays. The approach, published in the journal Scientific Reports, could pave the way towards a new cancer radiation therapy.
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Image: nanomaterial structural image; Copyright: Santos Lab

Nanotechnology: nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy

23.09.2019

Researchers at the University of Helsinki in collaboration with researchers from Åbo Akademi University,Finland and Huazhong University of Science and Technology,China have developed a new anti-cancer nanomedicine for targeted cancer chemotherapy. This new nano-tool provides a new approach to use cell-based nanomedicines for effcient cancer chemotherapy.
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Image: Narasimhan Rajaram at a computer in the laboratory; Copyright: University Relations / University of Arkansas

Imaging: supporting cancer treatment monitoring

06.09.2019

A grant from the National Institutes of Health will support a biomedical engineering professor's pursuit of technologies that can identify treatment-resistant tumors early in the treatment process.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: graphic that describes the workflow of Radiomics Analysis for IHC Indicators; Copyright: American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

AI: radiomics model to predict thyroid nodules

02.09.2019

Machine learning models can be trained to extract immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics from the CT scans of patients with suspected thyroid nodules, and these IHC characteristics can then be utilized to significantly improve thyroid nodule diagnoses.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02.09.2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02.09.2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: Displacement comparison at the end-systolic frame and final frame; Copyright: WMG University of Warwick

Imaging: new MRI technique spots scar heart muscles

30.08.2019

Traditional MRI scans use the metal gadolinium, which resonates areas of the heart muscles that are not functioning efficiently, however gadolinium affect the Kidney function. The new 3D MRI computing technique calculates strain in heart muscles showing which muscles are not functioning enough without damaging other organs - researchers at WMG, University of Warwick have found.
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Image: MRI; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Imaging: reducing size and weight of MRI equipment

24.07.2019

The Superconductivity Research Center of the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI, President Gyu-ha Choe) under the Ministry of Science and ICT has developed a superconducting insulation technology that can significantly reduce the size and weight of medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment.
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Bild: Mann liegt auf dem Boden, vor ihm der mobile Roboter mit Tablet; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

MobiKa – programmed to help

22.05.2019

Many illnesses or old age require help with everyday tasks. Unfortunately, family members or caregivers aren’t always available to lend a hand. The MobiKa mobile service robot is designed to offer support, deliver motivation and improve the quality of life of those in need.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23.04.2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08.04.2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: graphical steps of lung segmentation; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus/A. Braune

Lung segmentation: easier and faster thanks to new algorithms

01.10.2018

A look inside the lungs is a time-consuming process. To identify the boundaries of the respiratory organ from surrounding other organs, tissues, and structures requires between 200 and 500 computed tomographic images and subsequent manual markings – an elaborate process that can take up to six hours. An optimized computer program is now able to do this in only a few seconds.
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Image: Radiology assistant presses a button at the front of a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Lung cancer: Screening with low-Dose CT scans

01.10.2018

Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest cancers. The symptoms tend to be non-specific, often causing its detection to be too late. Currently, there is no comprehensive screening. This could change with the use of low-dose CT scans. It should be noted that this is not just an issue of technical feasibility. A screening test must also make sense from a health policy perspective.
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Image: A man is working at a computer that shows a model of the human liver; Copyright: Fraunhofer MEVIS

AI in medicine: Machines do not learn like humans

01.08.2018

For years, medicine has been exploring AI techniques aimed at easing physician workload. While computers may not have the medical expertise and skills obtained through years of study, they can recognize patterns and specific features in datasets and draw deductions.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08.03.2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: A large medical device with a treatment couch and four movable boxes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Thomas Hecker

Cancer: refined treatment with proton minibeams

10.07.2017

Radiation therapies are an essential component of today’s oncology because they enable the treatment of localized tumors. Yet they have one major drawback: radiation damages not just tumor cells but also healthy tissue. One solution to solve this problem could be proton minibeam therapy, which uses finely focused beams.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

Radiology – How an MRI machine makes its way into an office

13.04.2017

These days, medical imaging is one of the key diagnostic methods. But how do large medical devices actually get to their final destination? MEDICA-tradefair.com took its camera along to observe the remodeling of a radiology imaging office. The leading actors: a CT scanner and an MRI machine.
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Image: Children playing outside, getting wet in the water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Pneumonia in Children: Ultrasound or X-Rays?

08.03.2017

Pneumonia is the most frequent respiratory disease in children and can even cause death. That is why it is extremely important to make an accurate diagnosis as quickly as possible. If this requires imaging tests, normally X-rays are taken. But there is an alternative: ultrasound.
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