Background Reports 2019 -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Female physician shows a man an image of his brain with a tumor marked; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Imaging: peeking into the genome of brain tumors

17.01.2020

Researchers at Osaka University have developed a computer method that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and machine learning to rapidly forecast genetic mutations in glioma tumors, which occur in the brain or spine. The work may help glioma patients to receive more suitable treatment faster, giving better outcomes. The research was recently published in Scientific Reports.
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Image: Female physician shows a man an image of the prostate; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Prostate cancer can now be diagnosed better using AI

16.01.2020

Researchers at Radboud university medical center have developed a 'deep learning' system that is better than most pathologists at determining the aggressiveness of prostate cancer. The AI system, which uses tissue samples to arrive at its diagnosis, taught itself to identify prostate cancer based on data from over 1200 patients.
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Image: Computer-generated image of the heart in front of sinus curves; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adrenalina (YAYMicro)

Electron cryomicroscopy shows cardiac thin filament structure

13.01.2020

Researchers at Osaka University used electron cryomicroscopy (CryoEM) to image essential cardiac muscle components, known as thin filaments, with unprecedented resolution. They also discovered the mechanism by which these filaments regulate heartbeat via cardiac muscle contractions in the presence or absence of calcium ions by changing their conformations.
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Image: man at a microscope; Copyright: DEAN ISHIDA

Biomarker predicts risks in patients with heart failure

07.01.2020

A UCLA-led study revealed a new way to predict which patients with "stable" heart failure – those who have heart injury but do not require hospitalization – have a higher risk of dying within one to three years.
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Image: laboratory technology; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Robert Przybysz

Analyser system: Epigenomic technology combats disease

11.12.2019

Much remains unknown about diseases and the way our bodies respond to them, in part because the human genome is the complete DNA assembly that makes each person unique. A Virginia Tech professor and his team of researchers have created new technology to help in understanding how the human body battles diseases.
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 Image: illustration of the ConvPath software workflow; Copyright: UTSW

Software tool: AI helps doctors identify cancer cells

11.12.2019

UT Southwestern researchers have developed a software tool that uses artificial intelligence to recognize cancer cells from digital pathology images - giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes.
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Image: Colorful computer-generated rendering of damaged cartilage tissue; Copyright: Brian Bay, Oregon State University

Imaging study paves way to better understanding of arthritis

03.12.2019

Oregon State University research has provided the first complete, cellular-level look at what is going on in joints afflicted by osteoarthritis, a debilitating and costly condition that affects nearly one-quarter of adults in the United States.
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Image: Diascopic's iON platform next to a laptop; Diascopic, LLC

AI: startup developing tool for tuberculosis detection

27.11.2019

Diascopic LLC, a Cleveland-based medical research company that develops diagnostic technology, will use a highly competitive federal grant to develop and apply new artificial intelligence (AI) and digital pathology tools for detecting tuberculosis (TB).
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Image: Two screens with picture of the circulatory system in a catheter laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

MEDICA TECH FORUM: light-based imaging technique OCT

04.11.2019

Since its inception, MEDICA TECH FORUM has focused on the implementation of innovations and new technologies into clinical practice. 2019 marks the tenth year of the Forum. In honor of its anniversary, we will brighten things up a bit, as one of the focal points will highlight how optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light to produce images.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08.08.2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01.08.2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22.08.2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23.10.2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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