Background Reports 2017 -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: mouse and cells depiction; Copyright: Science China Press

Minimal-invasive hydrogen therapy for cancer treatment

10.02.2020

Up to now, cancer is still one of the major diseases that threaten the survival of mankind, and it is difficult to cure clinically. In addition to single or combined surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which are commonly used clinically, a number of promising therapeutic strategies have been recently put forward.
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Image: A surgeon with a radiation protection vest in the OR; Copyright: Cedars-Sinai

TAVR shows similar safety outcomes as open-heart surgery

07.02.2020

A new study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai and other centers nationwide shows that patients who underwent a minimally invasive transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR), had similar key 5-year clinical outcomes of death and stroke as patients who had traditional open-heart surgery to replace the valve.
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Image: rib surgery; Copyright: Lauren Hooker, MUSC

New interventions for rib fractures

22.01.2020

By stabilizing fractured and partially dislocated ribs, physicians can improve patient quality of life according to a new multicenter study. When an arm snaps, a leg cracks or a wrist twists, physicians set the bone to ensure it heals properly and with as little discomfort to the patient as possible. But the same cannot be said for most rib fractures.
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Image: Woman does breathing exercise under supervision of a doctor; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Improving radiotherapy treatment with prolonged breath-holding

20.01.2020

A technique that enables patients suffering from heart conditions to hold their breath safely for over 5 minutes could have potential as part of a new treatment for cardiac arrhythmias, say researchers at the University of Birmingham.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprotheses: between possibility and reality

01.01.2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprotheses. Endoprotheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprotheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: patient with pain in fingers; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Milkos

APRICOT-project: implant "help(s) patients heal themselves"

01.01.2020

Today, people tend to live longer, while an increasing number of patients suffer from osteoarthritis. Even younger generations are now at a higher risk of getting osteoarthritis due to the frequent use of mobile devices. The EU research project APRICOT aims to develop a novel type of implant for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hands – helping patients heal themselves.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01.01.2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprotheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: illustration of the methodology; Copyright: SUTD

Predicting spinal fractures

19.12.2019

Osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVFs) are a prevalent skeletal condition in the elderly, which occurs due to a net loss in bone density with the inevitable onset of aging. Unfortunately, they are largely under-diagnosed until detected by clinicians through radiological scans. These fractures have a huge impact on daily lifestyle as the spine is responsible for bodily movements and stability.
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Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11.06.2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with MedicalTek Co., Ltd.

15.11.2018

Many diagnostic and treatment questions can be answered with a glance inside the body. At the MedicalTek stand at MEDICA 2018, we learn how imaging systems in minimally invasive surgery can help physicians.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Surglasses: surgery with perspective: Interview with Taiwan Main Orthopedics

15.11.2018

Surgeons need a good overview of what they are doing. This is especially true for minimally-invasive surgery, since they cannot see the operating area directly. Using augmented reality, Taiwan Main Orthopedics Biotechnology helps surgeons to retain their perspective, even during complex interventions.
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Image: Doctor with a laptop, around him various medical images, behind him an ECG; Copyright: panthermedia.net/realinemedia

Surgical navigation systems: Safely guiding the scalpel

04.01.2018

Imaging, navigation, integration – these are terms that describe the modern operating room. All of these components play a key role in accurate surgical procedures. They are integrated into surgical navigation systems, which make complicated medical surgeries considerably safer.
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Image: OR with very modern equipment; Copyright; Swen Reichhold

OR of the future: Surgical navigation systems and integrated devices

04.01.2018

While it is commonplace for operating room staff to work together as a team, the collaboration of operating room systems does not always work so well – many devices are still separated from one another, causing the OR processes to be prone to mistakes. The same applies to surgical navigation technologies that represent the interface between imaging, the surgeon and therapeutic devices.
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Image: forearm bone which is scanned in the ultrasound hand scanner; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Using ultrasound for verification: proof of legal age via handheld scanner

22.11.2017

Human trafficking is a global crime that often preys on underage persons and forces them into prostitution and forced labor. In most cases, people are smuggled across borders with fake passports. Scientists at the Fraunhofer IBMT have now developed a non-invasive, handheld smartphone-compatible scanner that uses ultrasound to determine whether a person has reached full legal age.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Photochemical internalization – A new hope against bile duct cancer?

03.07.2017

Advanced bile duct tumors cannot always be removed surgically. Then, patients receive chemotherapy and a stent that corrects the narrowing of the bile duct that is caused by the tumor. Another, local therapy option is tested at the University Hospital Frankfurt: laser light is used to transport drugs into the tumor during photochemical internalization.
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Image: Black-and-white picture, with some structures of the human body highlighted in color; Copyright: ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern

Cochlear implants: safe procedure thanks to surgical robots

22.05.2017

For many years, cochlear implants have restored a sense of hearing in people with certain types of hearing loss. For surgeons, the implantation requires a precise attention to detail under the microscope. The results for the patients improve significantly with a more precise placement of the electrode array. The use of a surgical robot can increase the accuracy of the procedure.
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Image: Computer-generated graphic showing two hip balls next to each other. Implantation of a sleeve is demonstrated on them; Copyright: revomotion GmbH Köln

Hip joint: sleeve versus endoprosthesis

10.04.2017

People with hip osteoarthritis often suffer from severe pain and only an endoprosthesis implantation can provide relief. This involves a major intervention and long-term rehabilitation because the implant requires the removal of a section of the thigh bone. The "MioHIP" research project looks for an elastic alternative.
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Image: Surgeon is working at a simulator of the human back with two instruments; Copyright: HTWK Leipzig/Rebecca Schweier

RealSpine: realistic surgical simulation

22.02.2017

Surgeons need a great sense of touch. They first have to acquire this skill in simulation training before they can perform surgery on actual patients. Having said that, simulators are not just meant to teach the right movements; ideally, they should also provide a true-to-life experience of the surgical field – as is the case in RealSpine surgical training.
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