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Image: Eye test, machine and a woman for optometric assistance, retinal scanning or optical surgery in a clinic.; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

YuriArcursPeopleimages

Eye scans provide crucial insights into kidney health

08.12.2023

3D eye scans can reveal vital clues about kidney health that could help to track the progression of disease, research suggests. The advance could revolutionise monitoring of kidney disease, which often progresses without symptoms in the early stages.
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Image: Close up: Positive COVID rapid test in a tray; Copyright: elenabednykh

elenabednykh

AI used in new COVID-19 test improves accuracy

06.12.2023

A new AI-assisted molecular diagnostic platform capable of identifying variants of COVID-19 and other infectious diseases has been developed by scientists in the UK. The low cost, portable device could play a crucial role in preventing future pandemics due to its accuracy and versatility.
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Image: A male radiologist presses the MRI button to examine the female patient and look at the camera; Copyright: anatoliy_gleb

anatoliy_gleb

Imaging: new approaches for medical diagnostics

27.11.2023

Imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography (PET) are indispensable today for the diagnosis and localization of many diseases. A newly developed procedure now enables PET to be used specifically on the basis of changes in the human genome.
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A man in a suit walks through the MEDICA exhibition hall with a microphone; copyright: beta-web | Messe Düsseldorf

eHealth, mHealth, AI, and much more – Highlight tour in the MEDICA START-UP PARK

13.11.2023

Every year, the MEDICA START-UP PARK attracts a lot of visitors. Young, up-and-coming companies present their products here – often for the first time ever. This stand has already been the starting point for the success stories of some companies that are now internationally active. At MEDICA 2023, we are once again taking the opportunity to talk to promising start-ups.
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Image: Rebecca Richards-Kortum smiles at the camera in a lab; Copyright: Brandon Martin/Rice University

Brandon Martin/Rice University

Affordable global health technologies for early cancer detection

06.11.2023

A Rice University-led collaboration from three continents has won up to a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish a premier research center in the Texas Medical Center to develop affordable, effective point-of-care (POC) technologies that improve early cancer detection in low-resource settings in the United States and other countries.
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Image: A person wearing white disposable gloves examines a woman's back with a magnifying glass; Copyright: Medical University of Vienna

Medical University of Vienna

Skin cancer diagnoses using AI are as reliable as those made by medical experts

02.11.2023

An Austrian-Australian research team led by dermatologist Harald Kittler from MedUni Vienna investigated the extent to which diagnosis and therapy of pigmented skin lesions benefit from it in a realistic clinical scenario.
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Image: Person lying on the stretcher of an MRI scanner while a doctor puts headphones on her head; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

3-Tesla MRI Scanner: A Glimpse into the Future of Medical Technology

31.10.2023

With novel technology and the integration of artificial intelligence, a new MRI scanner promises to significantly improve medical imaging. The scanner is characterized by its high performance and enables a more precise analysis of image data by means of an AI functionality.
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Image: Icons of networks and contacts between people and groups on yellow and orange surfaces; Copyright: wirestock

wirestock

Collective intelligence can reduce medical misdiagnoses

30.10.2023

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, the Institute for Cognitive Sciences and Technologies (ISTC), and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology developed a collective intelligence approach to increase the accuracy of medical diagnoses.
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Image: Symbolic image: colored contrasting lines in blue and violet on a white background; Copyright: alexlucru123

alexlucru123

Novel nanoparticles could serve as contrast agents

27.10.2023

Special nanoparticles could one day improve modern imaging techniques. Developed by researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the properties of these unique nanoparticles change in reaction to heat.
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Image: 3D illustration of red and elongated Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

Why tuberculosis bacteria form long chains

25.10.2023

A researcher team from Ecole Polytechnique Federal de Lausanne led by Dr. Vivek Thacker now group leader at the Department of Infectious Diseases at Heidelberg University Hospital have studied why tuberculosis bacteria form long strands and how this affects their infectivity.
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Image: A doctor examines the abdominal cavity with an ultrasound probe; Copyright: Colourbox

Colourbox

Ultrasound: special probes improve imaging in obese patients

24.10.2023

A new study conducted at the University of Leipzig Medical Center and supported by the Helmholtz Institute for Metabolism, Obesity and Vascular Research (HI-MAG) shows that obesity affects the quality of ultrasound scans of the liver and kidneys.
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Image: In the study, the researchers investigated the thymus using CT at the Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization; Copyright: Charlotte Perhammar/Linköping University

Charlotte Perhammar/Linköping University

CT scan can reveal immune system ageing

20.10.2023

With age, the glandular tissue in the thymus is replaced by fat, but, according to a new study from Linköping University, the rate at which this happens is linked to sex, age and lifestyle factors.
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Image: Elderly gentleman lies on CT scanner with his head to the camera; Copyright: imagesourcecurated

imagesourcecurated

Smarter CT scans may approach the level of MRI

20.10.2023

In certain cases, a new method can provide as much information from brain images taken with computed tomography (CT) as images captured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
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Image: Two men stand in a server room and look into the camera equipped with a fisheye lens; Copyright: Linköping University

Linköping University

A step towards AI-based precision medicine

19.10.2023

Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have developed an AI-based method applicable to various medical and biological issues. Their models can for instance accurately estimate people’s chronological age and determine whether they have been smokers or not.
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Image: Example of ChatGPT response; despite asking the ChatGPT the exact same questions about orthopedic symptoms, the ChatGPT offered different diagnoses on different days; Copyright: TMDU

Division of Medical Design Innovations, TMDU

Can ChatGPT diagnose a condition?

18.10.2023

A research group led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) finds that when common orthopedic symptoms are given, ChatGPT’s diagnosis and recommendations are inconsistent.
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Image: The patch with sensors, electronics and battery; Copyright: Fraunhofer IZM / Volker Mai

Fraunhofer IZM / Volker Mai

ECG with a patch: APPLAUSE European collaborative project successfully completed

17.10.2023

Researchers from Fraunhofer IZM, together with 31 partners from industry and research, have developed a stretchable and wireless patch that can be used to make it possible to conduct diagnostically relevant cardiac monitoring in everyday life.
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Image: A patient on the examination table. Three people in white coats stand next to it and look at an ultrasound image on the screen; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

Heart failure: new approaches for treatment shortly before or after birth

06.10.2023

Researchers at MHH want to study the altered lipid metabolism in patients with pregnancy cardiomyopathy (PPCM) and find new biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy.
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COMPASS: Inexpensive and fast detection method for viruses

02.10.2023

Since Corona, everyone has probably come into contact with a rapid test for checking viral load. A new device called COMPASS promises much faster and more effective testing than conventional methods. It was developed by researchers at Julius Maximilian University in Würzburg in cooperation with Erlangen University Hospital.
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Image: Doctor sits at a laptop and points at the screen with a pen; Copyright: paegagz

paegagz

Algorithm to predict disease relapses

29.09.2023

A University of Texas at Arlington research team has received a $450,000 grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences to use statistical machine learning to review patient data and better predict which patients will need additional treatments.
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Image: Professor Dr. Anna-Maria Dittrich and Dr. Matthias Gietzelt (with tablet) stands in a building passage and smiles for the camera; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

CALM-QE: Personalized diagnostics in asthma and COPD

27.09.2023

The MHH Children's Hospital is participating in a nationwide project to better predict individual disease courses in non-infectious lung diseases using standardised data from health care and environmental data.
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Image: Portrait photo of a man (Steef Kurstjens) with red-brown hair in a white doctor's coat; Copyright: European Society for Emergency Medicine

European Society for Emergency Medicine

ChatGPT suggests most likely diagnoses in the emergency medicine department

25.09.2023

The artificial intelligence chatbot ChatGPT performed as well as a trained doctor in suggesting likely diagnoses for patients being assessed in emergency medicine departments.
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Image: Schematic structure of a sensor for the detection of viral pathogens; Copyright: TUD

TUD

Diagnostics: pioneering approaches for the detection of viral antigens

22.09.2023

Scientists from the Chair of Materials Science and Nanotechnology at TU Dresden (TUD) have made considerable progress in the development of highly innovative solutions for the detection of viral pathogens in two studies they presented recently.
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Image: Laboratory worker holds a test tube with blood samples in his hands, test tubes with biomaterial; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

New blood marker can identify parkinsonian diseases

20.09.2023

Is it possible that a single biomarker can detect all types of diseases related to dopamine deficiency in the brain? Yes, that's what a research group in Lund is discovering.
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Image: Half-bald man with glasses in a dark jacket stands in the sunshine and smiles into the camera; Copyright: Ryan Hull

Ryan Hull

Pathogen detection through electronic detection of DNA nanoballs

19.09.2023

Researchers at Karolinska Institute have developed a novel method using DNA Nanoballs to detect pathogens, aiming to simplify nucleic acid testing and revolutionize pathogen detection.
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Image: A close-up of a hand holding a premature baby in the incubator; Copyright: wirestock

wirestock

Premature infants: early detection of vascular disease

14.09.2023

Dr. Anne Hilgendorff’s team from Helmholtz Munich and the LMU University Hospital developed a non-invasive method with no need for sedation using MR imaging to detect early signs of vascular disease associated with chronic pulmonary impairment in premature infants, offering new avenues for risk stratification and potential prevention of complications later in life.
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Image: Nurse prepares patient for blood test; Copyright: seventyfourimages

seventyfourimages

New blood test gives very high accuracy to screen for Alzheimer’s disease

08.09.2023

A new blood test called p-tau217 shows promise as an Alzheimer's disease biomarker, and when used in a two-step workflow very high accuracy to either identify or exclude brain amyloidosis, the most important and earliest pathology.
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Image: Woman and man in white coats stand in front of an emergency clinic and pose for the camera; Copyright: Axel Kirchhof | UKE

Axel Kirchhof | UKE

Modifiable risk factors responsible for half of cardiovascular diseases

07.09.2023

Scientists of the Global Cardiovascular Risk Consortium have proven that the five classic cardiovascular risk factors overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, and diabetes mellitus are directly connected to more than half of all cardiovascular diseases worldwide.
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Image: A bald man in a white coat stands in a laboratory and looks over at other people; Copyright: Joakim Palmqvist

Joakim Palmqvist

Advanced biosensors to detect tumors, viruses and bacterial diseases

06.09.2023

Linnaeus University is partnering with industry and healthcare to develop advanced biosensors, investing SEK 35 million in a project aimed at faster and cost-effective diagnoses of aggressive lung cancer, viral, and bacterial diseases, potentially enabling self-testing at home.
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Image: A woman hands a yellow piece of paper to a man across a table where another person is also sitting; Copyright: InfectoGnostics

InfectoGnostics

InfectoGnostics study: Benefits of on-site tests in general practices

05.09.2023

General practitioners (GP) regularly use on-site rapid tests because they find their application useful. However, frequent utilisation fails due to costs and remuneration regulations. These are the results of a study by InfectoGnostics researchers at the University Hospital Jena in the project "POCT-ambulant", in which 292 GPs in Thuringia, Bremen and Bavaria participated.
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Image: Preview picture of video

From under one roof: x-ray equipment and its software

30.08.2023

We visited Oehm & Rehbein. The German company offers everything from a single source. In the interview, Managing Director Bernd Oehm tells us why this pays off and what the experts in X-ray equipment are currently working on.
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Image: A woman sits on the bed and holds her stomach in pain; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

YuriArcursPeopleimages

AI could shorten the diagnostic journey of millions suffering from endometriosis

16.08.2023

The quality of life of millions suffering from endometriosis – a painful disease where sensitive tissue grows outside of the uterus – could be improved by a new artificial intelligence (AI) system with technology developed by the University of Adelaide in South Australia, in partnership with researchers from the University of Surrey.
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Image: A woman in personal protective clothing examines samples under a microscope; Copyright: monkeybusiness

monkeybusiness

Pandemic prevention: progress in research infrastructure

15.08.2023

The Covid-19 pandemic has clearly shown that there is still a lot of potential in research structures and funding to better manage a pandemic. Prevention plays just as important a role as dealing with the pandemic. Technological measures that can facilitate virus detection or help to analyze the course in more detail need to be developed.
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Image: X-ray image of a lung; Copyright: Shaiith

Shaiith

AI shows how Aspergillus fumigatus gets comfortable in the lungs

14.08.2023

Aspergillus fumigatus strains that infect humans have a significantly altered metabolism compared to other strains in the environment. At the same time, infection with the fungus leads to an apparent change in the human lung microbiome.
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Image: Diagram of a color coordinate representation of the heart chambers; Copyright: Dr. Axel Loewe, KIT

Dr. Axel Loewe, KIT

Machine learning: artificial neural networks localize extrasystoles

03.08.2023

Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) use machine learning for the non-invasive localization of ventricular extrasystoles. This may facilitate and improve future diagnosis and therapy.
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Image: A doctor examines a patient's left shoulder for skin cancer; Copyright: Inside Creative House/Shutterstock

Inside Creative House/Shutterstock

Skin cancer diagnosis: reinforcement learning for improved performance of AI

02.08.2023

An international research team led by Harald Kittler of MedUni Vienna has now explored a learning method in which greater accuracy in AI results can be achieved by incorporating human decision-making criteria.
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Image: The superior cervical ganglion of a mouse: Here, neurons that control the heart muscle are in close proximity to those that control the pineal gland; Copyright: Karin Ziegler / TUM

Karin Ziegler / TUM

Cardiac disease: new technique shows cause of sleep disturbance

27.07.2023

In a paper published in the journal Science, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows that heart diseases affect the production of the sleep hormone melatonin in the pineal gland.
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Image: Michal Rawlik (left), first author of the publication, and Marco Stampanoni pose at a table in an office space; Copyright: Paul Scherrer Institut

Paul Scherrer Institut

Improvement of the CT: earlier detection of breast cancer

26.07.2023

A team of researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich, together with the Baden Cantonal Hospital (KSB) and the University Hospital Zurich (USZ), has succeeded in refining mammography, x-ray imaging technique used to detect tumours in their early stages, to produce considerably more reliable results and be less unpleasant for the patient.
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Image: Young woman in medical mask with smartphone makes a selfie; Copyright: natalyaraeva

natalyaraeva

App helps with early detection of eye diseases causing blindness

21.07.2023

Two students on the Master's Degree in Bioinformatics and Biostatistics at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) have developed a mobile app capable of detecting in a matter of seconds whether someone is suffering from glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy or cataracts, three of the world's most common causes of vision loss and blindness.
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Image: an intern shows an senior physician something on a tablet. The two stand on a glass gallery in a hospital; Copyright: monkeybusiness

monkeybusiness

Into the hospital of the future: data, digitization and artificial intelligence

18.07.2023

Artificial intelligence (AI) and its use is on everyone's lips right now. How AI will change and shape our future is being hotly debated. AI applications are also trending in healthcare. But before they can deliver on their huge expectations, the basics have to be met.
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Image: The monitor uses a biosensor made with nanobodies that is integrated into an air sampler that operates based on the wet cyclone technology; Copyright: Joseph Puthussery

Joseph Puthussery

Biosensing: air monitor can detect COVID-19 variants

13.07.2023

Scientists are looking at ways to surveil indoor environments in real time for viruses. By combining recent advances in aerosol sampling technology and an ultrasensitive biosensing technique, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have created a real-time monitor that can detect any of the SARS-CoV-2 virus variants in a room in about 5 minutes.
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Image: Close-up of a female eye in purple-blue futuristic design concept; Copyright: lassedesignen/Shutterstock

lassedesignen/Shutterstock

Multiple sclerosis: new biomarker for early diagnosis

12.07.2023

A study conducted by researchers from the Department of Neurology at MedUni Vienna and University Hospital Vienna has demonstrated for the first time that diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be significantly improved by additionally measuring the thickness of retinal layers in the eye.
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Image: Woman in a laboratory collecting blood samples; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

Molecular tumor profiling: blood test to determine the optimal cancer therapy

11.07.2023

If a tumor is diagnosed, tissue samples are usually investigated to determine the molecular tumor profile for personalized cancer treatment. However, tissue biopsy cannot be performed in all affected individuals. Therefore, the University Hospital Zurich has licensed a liquid biopsy for the analysis of more than 300 genes and offers this test as a modern diagnostic method to tumor patients.
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Image: Nurse in mask with cardiac patient at doctor's appointment shows heart chart on tablet in modern clinic; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Coronary heart disease: recommendations for imaging diagnostics

11.07.2023

An interdisciplinary team of clinicians and scientists has published a consensus paper recommending appropriate quantitative imaging techniques for coronary artery stenosis and atherosclerosis related treatment and procedural planning.
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Image: Close-up of an ultrasound scan of a female abdomen by a female doctor; Copyright: Natabuena

Natabuena

Functional imaging: intestinal and liver diseases mutually influence each other

06.07.2023

The research groups of Prof. Trautwein (University Hospital RWTH Aachen) and Prof. Hengstler (Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors in Dortmund) have made a surprising discovery about the interaction of the liver and the intestine.
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Image: Child being tested for viruses in the throat by a doctor using a test swab; Copyright: drazenphoto

drazenphoto

Revolutionizing virus detection: the power of AI and CRISPR

04.07.2023

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists and researchers have been tirelessly working to develop innovative and accurate tests to identify the presence of viruses. One breakthrough technology that has emerged is the combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and CRISPR, which has revolutionized virus detection.
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Image: A woman with dark hair and a white coat sits in a laboratory and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

Sickle cell disease: portable tool for diagnosis, monitoring receives U.S. patent

30.06.2023

Using microfluidics, flow cytometry and electrical impedance, Sarah Du recently received a patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office for a novel invention that will offer patients a better way to manage their disease.
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Image: Two young men in white coats, Dr. Jonas Hall and Dr. Niklas Klümper, pose in front of the camera in a research complex; Copyright: University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

Metastatic renal cell carcinoma: improved prediction of therapy response

29.06.2023

The study demonstrates a significant improvement in predicting the response to therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma by incorporating the level of inflammation, which was assessed using two straightforward blood parameters, alongside the conventional imaging-based approach.
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Image: Portrait of a smiling senior woman shopping in the supermarket with a trolley; Copyright: lucigerma

lucigerma

Atrial fibrillation: supermarket trolleys set to help diagnosis

29.06.2023

It could be the shopping trip that saves your life: supermarket trolleys are helping to diagnose atrial fibrillation which can then be treated to prevent disabling or fatal strokes.
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Image: Depiction of a brain and the nerve connections that run down the spinal cord; Copyright: joaquincorbalan

joaquincorbalan

Fiber-based endo-microscope: understanding neuronal communication

28.06.2023

A new hair-thin endo-microscope, developed by an international team with the participation of Leibniz IPHT, promises extremely gentle in-depth observations.
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 Image: Infant lying in a mobile MRI unit with a doctor holding a tablet and a woman sitting next to him; Copyright: University Hospital Bonn (UKB)/A. Winkler

University Hospital Bonn (UKB)/A. Winkler

Mobile MRI: Gates Foundation funds world's first examinations in children under ECMO

20.06.2023

The University Hospital of Bonn (UKB) is the first hospital in the world to examine and monitor children receiving ECMO therapy with a mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. This was possible thanks to a funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
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Image: Device for scanning and diagnostic viewing of patients; Copyright: mstandret

mstandret

AI in eye scans: improved diagnosis of inherited disease of the retina

14.06.2023

Researchers from the UK and Germany have used artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a system that they believe will enable more widespread provision of testing, together with improved efficiency.
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Image: Schleswig-Holstein's Minister President Daniel Günther opened the

Staatskanzlei SH

AI from the universities in Kiel and San Francisco launched

14.06.2023

A delegation from the CAU and UKSH joined Schleswig-Holstein's Minister President Daniel Günther in opening the new infrastructure for AI in the USA in the night of 8 June 2023 (German time).
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Image: Magnetic nanoparticles (red) bind specifically to the spherical bacteria (yellow) which are about 1 µm in size (electron microscopy digitally colored); Copyright: Empa

Empa

Antibiotics crisis: rapid test for sepsis with nanoparticles

09.06.2023

For Qun Ren, every minute counts. The Empa researcher and her team are currently developing a diagnostic procedure that can detect life-threatening blood poisoning caused by staphylococcus bacteria rapidly. This is because staphylococcal sepsis is fatal in up to 40 percent of the cases.
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Image: Nils Wagner, a man with brown hair in a T-shirt, sits at a computer screen on which codes are displayed; Copyright: Dennis Gankin / TUM

Dennis Gankin / TUM

Algorithm helps search for the cause of hereditary diseases

07.06.2023

A Munich research team has developed an algorithm that predicts the effects of genetic mutations on RNA formation six times more precisely than previous models.
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Image: A silver medical device with a large display on a table in a physician's office; Copyright: NIMBLE Diagnostics SL

NIMBLE Diagnostics SL

Imaging: monitoring cardiovascular stents with microwaves

30.05.2023

A cardiovascular stent may fail after implantation. Patients with arteriosclerosis then must undergo angiography again. The condition of the stent is examined or a new stent is placed during this procedure. Barcelona-based company NIMBLE Diagnostics is now working on an easier method to monitor stents after implantation.
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Image: The experts Luis Miguel Echeverry and Neus Martínez-Abadías at the Faculty of Biology of the UB; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

Rare disease diagnosis: AI algorithms do not include human diversity

17.05.2023

Most of the AI-generated algorithms have databases with populations of European origins and they ignore the genetic and morphological diversity of human populations of around the world.
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Image: OR monitor that shows heart rate and other vital parameters, behind it an OR team; Copyright: bilanol

bilanol

OptoCarDi: searching for new diagnostic options to assess the heart muscle

16.05.2023

The preparations for the OptoCarDi project at the EAH Jena and the Jena University Hospital (UKJ) are in full swing. Starting in June 2023, a research team led by Prof. Iwan Schie (Biomedical Engineering), Prof. Robert Brunner (Miniaturized Optical Sensor Systems) and the cardiologists Prof. Sven Möbius-Winkler and Prof. Christian Schulze will develop an optical catheter prototype.
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Image: Young woman sleeping in her bed wearing a smartwatch on the wrist; Copyright: KaikaTaaK

KaikaTaaK

Digital biomarkers: a new way to look at diseases?

15.05.2023

We usually use biomarkers from body tissue or blood to diagnose diseases and monitor their progression. This requires taking and analyzing samples from patients at regular points in time. Two new studies shed light on an easier and less expensive method: using wearable sensors to collect movement data and AI to analyze them.
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Image: 3D cross section of a kidney; Copyright: European Cooperation in Science and Technology

European Cooperation in Science and Technology

Imaging chronic kidney disease

12.05.2023

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has shown a high potential to distinguish biomarkers for CKD, but renal MRI biomarkers are currently underused in research and clinical practice.
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Image: Multidimensional brain scan on a screen. In the background is an MRI room; Copyright: MedUni Wien

MedUni Wien

MRI imaging method without the need of radioactive substances

09.05.2023

Metabolic disorders play a central role in many common conditions, including Alzheimer's, depression, diabetes and cancer, which call for reliable as well as non-invasive diagnostic procedures.
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Image: Microscopic image of bone-marrow cells of a multiple myeloma patient.; Copyright: Berend Snijder Lab / ETH Zurich

Berend Snijder Lab / ETH Zurich

How to fight blood cancer more effectively

05.05.2023

Despite approved treatments being available, multiple myeloma remains incurable. But researchers at ETH Zurich and University Hospital Zurich set out to improve treatment outcomes by testing hundreds of existing therapeutics outside the body to predict their effectiveness.
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Image: child sitting at a table with his head on his arms while looking at papers on the table; Copyright: envato/Maria_Sbytova

envato/Maria_Sbytova

ADHD: Software supports diagnostic process

02.05.2023

To be diagnosed with ADHD, children must exhibit various factors and persistent patterns of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. It can sometimes be difficult to diagnose the condition because younger children change and develop rapidly. New software makes it possible to combine and analyze different evaluations and test results to facilitate a more informed and accurate diagnosis.
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Image: Senior Woman tests blood for glucose or sugar level for diabetes with glucometer; Copyright: Manuta

Manuta

Big Data: predictive model for complications in diabetes

01.05.2023

For their research, the team led by Rainer Oberbauer, Head of the Division of Nephrology and Dialysis at MedUni Vienna's Department of Medicine III, and Mariella Gregorich from MedUni Vienna's Center for Medical Data Science drew on data from major international studies.
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Image: Screenshot from the DeMAG webserver. DeMAG predicts benign mutations in light blue and pathogenic ones in coral; Copyright: Agnes Toth-Petroczy, Nature Communications

Agnes Toth-Petroczy, Nature Communications

New tool facilitates clinical interpretation of genetic information

27.04.2023

Max Planck and Harvard research teams develop DeMAG, a new method shared as an open-source web server (demag.org) to help interpret mutations in disease genes and improve clinical decision-making.
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Image: Pregnant woman sitting on bed checking her blood sugar level with glucometer; Copyright: AnnaStills

AnnaStills

Type 2 diabetes: risk displayed in early pregnancy blood samples

27.04.2023

Researchers from the University of Turku discovered that women who developed prediabetes after pregnancy had aberrations already in their early pregnancy blood serum metabolomic profile.
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Image: A doctor does an EEG scan on a patient; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Computer-assisted procedure classifies Ataxia-related speech disturbances

25.04.2023

Researchers at DZNE and the University Hospital Bonn, together with the Berlin-based company PeakProfiling GmbH, have developed a computer-assisted method that recognizes the severity of speech disturbances resulting from ataxia, a brain disease, with great accuracy.
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Image:An ophthalmologist looking at an OCT image together with the patient; Copyright: olgaseleznovaphoto

olgaseleznovaphoto

FALCO project: Comprehensive glaucoma prevention thanks to low-cost screening system

20.04.2023

Glaucoma is wicked, because the disease often goes undetected until irreversible damage of the optic nerve has occurred. This makes regular eye exams even more important. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging method that facilitates an early diagnosis. However, traditional OCT machines are very expensive. That’s why the FALCO project aims to develop a more cost-effective system.
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Image: Schematic illustration: The proposed robotic bronchoscope system for navigation-assisted intervention; Copyright: Cyborg and Bionic Systems

Cyborg and Bionic Systems

Novel robotic bronchoscope system for navigation and biopsy of pulmonary lesions

19.04.2023

A novel robotic bronchoscope system can non-intrusively access the area of interest within the lung for minimally invasive pulmonary lesions sampling, the gold standard of lung cancer diagnoses.
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Image: Graphic with the headline “Nanoreactors” that show the structure of a bead with annotations; Copyright: BLINK DX

BLINK DX

BLINK DX: revolutionizing digital PCR

11.04.2023

The polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, plays a major role both in the diagnosis of infectious diseases and in research. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the term has become widely known. At MEDICA 2022, the BLINK AG from Jena, Germany, presented the BLINK Beads, a technology that is bound to revolutionize the applications of PCR.
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Image: ENT doctor or dentist with a medical instrument examining the oral cavity; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

ONWARD Medical NV

PANDORA test could pave the way for better oral cancer detection

06.04.2023

Surrey scientists have developed a proof-of-concept test called PANDORA that was shown to be over 92% accurate at identifying patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The test was also shown to be more than 80% accurate at identifying patients with pre-cancer or oral epithelial dysplasia (OED).
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Image: Picture of the complete sensor with a PDMS well of 100 μl volume for the drop test; Copyright: HZDR/Sandoval Bojorquez

HZDR/Sandoval Bojorquez

Nanobiosensor developed for detecting SARS-CoV-2

04.04.2023

Infection and immunity status of the population are considered key parameters for handling pandemics. For this purpose, detecting antigens and antibodies is of great importance. The devices currently used for this purpose - what are known as point-of-care (POC) devices- are one option for rapid screening. Their sensitivity, however, needs further improvement.
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Image: Man with long brown hair and glasses, Viktor Jirsa, smiles at the camera; Copyright: private

private

Advances in brain modelling open path to digital twins for brain medicine

30.03.2023

In the current edition of The Lancet Neurology, researchers of the Human Brain Project (HBP) present the novel clinical uses of advanced brain modelling methods. Computational brain modelling techniques that integrate the measured data of a patient have been developed by researchers at AMU Marseille as part of the HBP.
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Image: Computer algorithm on laptop display and some other objects on the table; Copyright: Pressmaster

Pressmaster

Shining a light into the "black box" of AI

29.03.2023

Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG), and the National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a novel method for evaluating the interpretability of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, opening the door to greater transparency and trust in AI-driven diagnostic and predictive tools.
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Image: A man in a blue sweater, with short grey hair and glasses is looking into the tube of a tomograph, in which a phantom is positioned – Prof. Franz Pfeiffer; Copyright: Astrid Eckert / TUM

Astrid Eckert / TUM

COVID-19 and beyond: a deeper look into the lungs with dark-field X-rays

28.03.2023

Imaging reaches its limits when it comes to looking at the lungs: Alveoli are tiny, balloon-shaped air sacs in our lungs. These tissue structures are micrometers in diameter and currently cannot be visualized directly. Meanwhile, they exhibit early changes prompted by lung diseases such as COVID-19. Dark-field X-ray images could visualize these signs in the future.
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MRI in a class of its own

28.03.2023

Better images in less time – the new MRI at Cologne-Porz Hospital uses artificial intelligence to produce the most perfect images possible from inside the body. The flexible receiver coils play an important role in this, as they also significantly improve patient comfort.
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Image: Close-up of a pregnancy belly, the woman is holding her hand on her belly; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH.

Karin Kaiser/MHH.

Better care for pregnant women with precancerous cervical cancer

23.03.2023

Preliminary stages of cervical cancer occur mainly in women between 25 and 35 years of age. The main risk factor for developing cervical cancer is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Surgery is the treatment of choice.
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Image: Female doctor with purple ribbon, sign of Alzheimer's disease, pancreatic cancer, epilepsy, lupus day; Copyright: chormail

chormail

Solution to classify epileptic syndromes in near real-time

21.03.2023

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), close to 50 million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy, a chronic neurological disease, whose seizures are considered one of the main symptoms.
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Image: Closeup of ultrasound examination of abdominal cavity, stomach and heart with sonography sensor; Copyright: Natabuena

Natabuena

Ultrasound method could lead to easier disease diagnosis in body tissue

17.03.2023

A new ultrasound method that can measure the level of tension in human tissue for the first time - a key indicator of disease - has been developed by researchers from the University of Sheffield.
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Image: Blood test tube for laboratory on white background; Copyright: grafvision

grafvision

Epilepsy could become easier to pinpoint with blood test

17.03.2023

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have discovered higher levels of immune proteins in the blood before and after an epileptic seizure.
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Image: Results of an echocardiography ultrasound are displayed on a tablet; Copyright: envato/photovs

envato/photovs

Wearable belt: monitoring heart failure with sensors

14.03.2023

Usually, the solutions for monitoring heart failure are implantable and thus come with the risks of surgery. A research project has now developed a noninvasive solution based on sensor technology integrated into a wearable belt.
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Image: A man in a white shirt is having a heart attack; Copyright: Rawpixel

Rawpixel

Bracelet sensor assesses troponin levels to aid heart attack diagnosis

13.03.2023

An experimental wrist-worn device was found to predict troponin-I and obstructed arteries with 90% accuracy in five minutes, according to research.
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Image: Microscopic image: Mouse lymph nodes with colored fluorescent markers; Copyright: AG Hoelzel/UKB

AG Hoelzel/UKB

Artificial intelligence to help tumor immunology

09.03.2023

Developing methods to predict the nature of the tumor microenvironment is the goal of researchers from the Clusters of Excellence ImmunoSensation2 and the Hausdorff Center for Mathematics (HCM) led by Prof. Kevin Thurley at the University of Bonn.
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Image: A man in a blue shirt, Professor Dr Alexander Schönhuth, standing next to a wall and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Bielefeld University/Sarah Jonek

Bielefeld University/Sarah Jonek

Predicting outbreak of ALS disease with AI methods

08.03.2023

Using artificial intelligence (AI) methods, researchers led by Professor Dr Alexander Schönhuth from Bielefeld University’s Faculty of Technology have succeeded in recording and deciphering the genotype profiles of 3,000 ALS patients and thus learning more about the development of the disease.
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Image: Logo of the EU project miGut-Health, black, violet and green colors on a white background; Copyright: Eurice Office

Eurice Office

Personalised health blueprint to prevent and predict inflammatory bowel disease

07.03.2023

Project led by PMI member Prof. Andre Franke aims to empower people affected by Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis by developing interdisciplinary solutions for improved disease prevention and health promotion.
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Product design in medical technology

07.03.2023

Good design not only pleases the eye or the hand. It also guarantees intuitive and safe use and a long service life. Especially in medical technology, this can make a big difference – for staff as well as patients. Medical designers are therefore in great demand. At MEDICA 2022, we talked to two of them about their profession.
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Image: Two men in white laboratory clothing are working on new quantum light modules; Copyright: FBH/P. Immerz

FBH/P. Immerz

Entangled photon pairs to help fighting cancer

06.03.2023

The recently launched QEED project aims to significantly reduce measurement time in clinical cancer diagnostics by developing a spectrally resolved imaging technique based on entangled photon pairs. FBH scientists will develop the required diode lasers and quantum light modules.
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Image: Mattias Ekstedt, senior associate professor at Linköping smiles at the camera; Copyright: Thor Balkhed/Linköping University

Thor Balkhed/Linköping University

Adverse muscle composition associated with increased mortality risk in people with fatty liver disease

01.03.2023

Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle contribute to an increasing number of people developing fatty liver disease. There is a need for early detection of individuals at risk of developing sequelae.
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Image: Image compares simulated results from imaging the human chest with ordinary radiography (left) and with phase-contrast radiography; Copyright: Häggmark et al., 2023

Häggmark et al., 2023

Early-stage lung disease could be detected with advanced imaging tech

24.02.2023

An imaging process that today is used mainly in research labs could potentially detect early-stage lung disease if developed for use in hospitals and clinics, a new research study shows.
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Image: Two men and a woman stand in front of a building and smile for the camera; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

RUB, Marquard

AI with infrared imaging enables precise colon cancer diagnostics

23.02.2023

Researchers at the Centre for Protein Diagnostics PRODI at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, are using artificial intelligence in combination with infrared imaging to optimally tailor colon cancer therapy to individual patients.
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Image: A man in a blue coat, Araz Rawshani, poses for the camera.; Copyright: University of Gothenburg

University of Gothenburg

AI supports doctors’ hard decisions on cardiac arrest

21.02.2023

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed three such systems of decision support for cardiac arrest that may, in the future, make a major difference to doctors’ work.
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Image: Noninvasive intracranial pressure meter fixed to a man's head; Copyright: EPO

EPO

Low brain pressure could be a risk factor for developing glaucoma

20.02.2023

An international team of researchers led by Lithuanian scientists provide additional evidence that intracranial pressure plays an important role in normal-tension glaucoma, which accounts for up to 50 per cent of all glaucoma cases.
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Image: Woman with ruptured blood vessel in eye, closeup; Copyright: amenic181

amenic181

AI finds twisting of eye vessels could cause high blood pressure and heart disease

16.02.2023

Research led by scientists at St George’s, University of London has discovered 119 areas in the genome that help to determine the size and shape of blood vessels at the back of the eye, and that an increase in ‘twisting’ of the arteries could cause high blood pressure and heart disease.
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Image: A closeup of a foot on red fabric pads; Copyright: CC BY-SA 2.0.

CC BY-SA 2.0.

More accurate way of checking the blood flow in the feet of patients with type 2 diabetes

15.02.2023

Aston University scientists have discovered a more accurate way of checking the blood flow in the feet of patients with type 2 diabetes.
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Image: Physician in blue scrubs is standing next to a bed with a patient dummy; Copyright: Klinikum Oldenburg

Klinikum Oldenburg

Training: Learning to recognize delirium with the android patient

10.02.2023

Current patient simulators are mostly mannequins that can simulate vital functions via built-in electronics but are otherwise lifeless. An android patient could bring a breath of fresh air to training in the future. It can help hospital staff to better recognize delirium in patients and thus increase patient safety.
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Image: Close-up of the healing process of a corneal ulcer, postoperative results in vivo; Copyright: POSTECH

POSTECH

Treating cornea ulcers with diagnostic light instead of corneal transplantation

08.02.2023

Recently, a Korean joint research team from POSTECH-KKU has developed a new tissue adhesive that restores the damaged cornea by simply filling it and exposing it to light.
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Image: A man lies in a bed in front of the laptop and holds a pill case in his hand; Copyright: Iakobchuk

Iakobchuk

AI can help patients interpret home tests for COVID-19

03.02.2023

George Mason University researchers found that computerized symptom screenings can supplement at-home COVID-19 tests to better confirm the diagnosis for patients and clinicians.
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Image: Dr Rytis Maskeliūnas poses smiling in front of the camera, Copyright: Kaunas University of Technology (KTU)

Kaunas University of Technology (KTU)

Altered speech may be the first sign of Parkinson’s disease

31.01.2023

Lithuanian researcher from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Rytis Maskeliūnas, together with colleagues from the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences (LSMU), tried to identify early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease using voice data.
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Bild: DNA strand assembly from different elements. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

The architecture of shattered genomes

27.01.2023

Hunting for disease clues in the dark matter of our DNA. Scientists have reconstructed the chromosomes of patients with an extremely high number of aberrations in their genome that could alter the expression of nearby genes and potentially cause disease. Their results were published in Nature Communications in October 2022.
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Image: Close up of female scientist in white uniform holding microtiter plate while working in laboratory, Copyright: gstockstudio

gstockstudio

New blood test differentiates neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease from other dementias

23.01.2023

A new blood test that can track and follow the neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease – and exclude other dementias.
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Image: The word

margaritaylita

AI detects rare forms of dementia

20.01.2023

Researchers at MPI CBS and University of Leipzig Medical Center have used new artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning techniques to detect rare forms of dementia on MRI images.
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Image: Researcher examines cell culture plates under the microscope; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

Analyzing disease progression and cell processes with TIGER: in vivo and non-invasively

18.01.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) and the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) in Würzburg have developed a technology they call TIGER. It allows complex processes in individual cells to be deciphered in vivo by recording past RNA transcripts.
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Image: Test tubes with blood for checking antibodies in the fridge; Copyright: lorenzocapunata

lorenzocapunata

When antibodies do a pirouette

12.01.2023

Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg have developed a method for binding specific molecules in samples and serums, such as antibodies in the blood, to the surface of iron oxide particles thus allowing them to be identified using an inexpensive and compact detector.
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Image: The photomontage shows PD Dr. Mark Kühnel (left) and Christopher Werlein at a multi-end microscope with a tissue section of the heart vessels remodeled by COVID19; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/Abb.

Karin Kaiser/Abb.

How COVID-19 permanently damages the heart

12.01.2023

An interdisciplinary research team from MHH has used innovative molecular methods and a high-resolution microscopy technique to show how the ongoing inflammation in COVID-19 attacks the heart tissue.
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Image: Two doctors in scrubs look at a screen during an AI-assisted colonoscopy; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB)

Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB)

AI improves colorectal cancer screening in Lynch syndrome

10.01.2023

Researchers at the National Center for Hereditary Tumor Diseases (NZET) at Bonn University Hospital (UKB) have now found that artificial intelligence (AI) can improve the effectiveness of colonoscopy in the presence of Lynch syndrome.
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Image: person wearing VR glasses for biofeedback training with a doctor in a treatment room; Copyright: microgen

microgen

The digital patient: The next big step for healthcare

09.01.2023

The "digital patient" is a model that encompasses everything from patients who use VR headsets to meet with their doctor in the metaverse to those who use smart technologies to find a possible diagnosis.
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Image: Doctor takes a sample for coronavirus testing from a subject's nose; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

COMPASS for highly sensitive rapid tests

09.01.2023

A newly developed rapid test needs only a few seconds to reliably detect pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2. It is based on specially designed magnetic nanoparticles.
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Image: A woman in a white coat with blue gloves sits at a large microscope; Copyright: LZH

LZH

Detecting bacterial infestation fast, contactless, and free of markers

05.01.2023

With a multimodal microscope, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and three partners in the joint project PriMe want to make it possible to detect bacterial infestation using fast, marker-free, and contactless imaging.
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Image: Two men in white coats are standing at a microscope in the laboratory; Copyright: National University of Singapore

National University of Singapore

Scientists identify blood biomarker for cognitive impairment and dementia

02.01.2023

A recent study by a team comprising researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the National University Health System (NUHS) revealed that low levels of ergothioneine (ET) in blood plasma may predict an increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, suggesting possible therapeutic or early screening measures for cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly.
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Image: Screen with signs to explain the product

Listening for arrhythmias – Cardiokol ltd

17.11.2022

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke – especially in people older than 65. The Israel company Cardiokol offers software applications that enable mass tele-screening for AF. At MEDICA 2022, we met Co-Founder Eli Attar for a video interview. He explained to us how the solution of the company works.
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Laboratory: how smart gadgets support everyday work

17.11.2022

At MEDICA 2022, you can see why smart assistants are needed in the laboratory and which gadgets have made it into everyday laboratory work, thus reducing the workload of the specialists there and increasing efficiency.
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Home for medical technology – Highlight tour at the joint stand of NRW

16.11.2022

North Rhine-Westphalia offers good conditions as a location for medical technology companies. We spoke to Refined Laser Systems GmbH, United Robotics Group GmbH and weLLgo Medical Products GmbH during our tour of the NRW joint stand in Hall 3 / C80.
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Safety for healthcare professionals – Owen Mumford Ltd.

15.11.2022

Occupational accidents also happen in medicine. One of the most common are injuries with cannulas and needles. These are not only painful, but also carry a risk of infection. At MEDICA 2022, Owen Mumford will be showing solutions for safe drug administration and blood collection. In the video interview, we also learn more about the company's sustainability goals.
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Image: Brain monitoring software is displayed on a monitor; Copyright: Tuomas Svärd, Antti-Jussi Haapala, Jukka Kortelainen

Tuomas Svärd, Antti-Jussi Haapala, Jukka Kortelainen

Cerenion: AI software improves brain monitoring

27.09.2022

Intensive care patients need to be monitored closely in all areas. For a better overview of the brain functions, Cerenion developed software called C-Trend. With artificial intelligence, the care for intensive care patients can be significantly improved.
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Image: Scientist works with medical test tube to analyze green liquid; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Diagnosing breast cancer through liquid biopsy

22.09.2022

Breast cancer diagnosis usually includes invasive testing with tissue biopsies. The samples have to be extracted from the cancerous tissue or cells. To make the process easier on the patients, the project LIBIMEDOTS is currently developing a different approach with liquid biopsy technology.
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Image: Thierry Nordmann (left) & Lisa Schweizer are standing in the lab, each with a pipette in hand and a microtiter plate in front of them; Copyright: Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Deep Visual Proteomics: tracking down cancer

08.09.2022

Proteins are frequently called the building blocks of life because they are found everywhere, including in our cells. This makes them an important factor when it comes to diseases. As a result, mapping the protein landscape can be a crucial ally in the fight against diseases. Now, a German-Danish team has developed a method that provides researchers with unprecedented insights into cancer.
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Image: Two hands with gloves are sticking a wearable to a patient's chest; Copyright: MediBioSense

MediBioSense

MediBioSense: Real-time patient monitoring

01.09.2022

Medical wearables become more and more sophisticated. By now, they are not only able to record vital signs. With the Vital Connect Patch, MediBioSense is offering a wearable that can be used for real-time monitoring of patients.
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Image: scanning electron microscope image of red blood cells in the blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized treatment of acute stroke: diagnostics with 3D virtual histology

23.08.2022

Every minute counts when someone is having an acute stroke. If the cause is a vascular blockage caused by a blood clot (thrombus) in the brain, detailed insights into the thrombus composition is critical to remove or dissolve it successfully and help restore blood flow. But that’s often easier said than done when "time is brain".
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Image: Person in the laboratory holding cell samples under a microscope; Copyright: MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

Molecular markers: predicting the most effective treatment for IBD

09.08.2022

Early effective treatment can help manage this condition and improve the quality of life of patients. A research project aims to identify molecular markers to better assess the chances of success of certain biological therapies and subsequently determine the best individualized treatment plan.
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Image: Two male researchers analyzing data sets on a computer screen; Copyright: Felix Petermann | MDC

Felix Petermann | MDC

Project "ikarus" provides new insights for cancer research

01.08.2022

Artificial intelligence (AI) is about to become a game changer, especially in diagnostics. However, there are still limits to the use of AI. Dr. Altuna Akalin had to recognize this as well. The head of the Max Delbrück Center's (MDC) technology platform for "Bioinformatics and Omics Data Science" developed "ikarus" with his team.
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Image: Two drops of water on a screen that shows a pattern of colored bars; Copyright: ktsimage

ktsimage

Big Data in genetics: reaching diagnosis through heaps of data

01.08.2022

Most laboratory tests only produce small amounts of data that are already sufficient for successful diagnosis. It becomes more difficult with genetic questions: whether it is about a genetic disease or the properties of tumors, there are large amounts of data that must be considered. Both research and medicine need help to identify the connections and patterns in the data to find a diagnosis.
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Image: Gloved hand holds a cell culturing vessel in front of a screen with the depiction of a genetic analysis; Copyright: westend61

westend61

Big Data: Helper and game changer in laboratory medicine and genetics

01.08.2022

Big data, the use of large volumes of data in diagnostics and research, is giving medical science a powerful boost. Especially in laboratory medicine, big data can provide unprecedented support as doctors must consider a multitude of data and parameters to facilitate accurate medical decision-making.
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Image: surgical team of three people around a cardiac surgeon in an operating room looking at an echocardiogram on a screen; Copyright: westend 61

westend61

Is it a heart attack or something else? How artificial intelligence can support diagnostics

22.07.2022

Chest pain, shortness of breath, a brief loss of consciousness – warning signs that suggest a heart attack. But it might also be Takotsubo syndrome, also known as stress cardiomyopathy or broken heart syndrome with symptoms that resemble a heart attack. Yet it is of utmost importance to differentiate between the two conditions to initiate the right treatment.
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Image: Chip with adipose tissue is held in place by hands in purple disposable gloves; Copyright: Berthold Steinhilber

Berthold Steinhilber

Ex vivo obesity research thanks to the adipose-on-chip system

08.07.2022

Ex vivo studies of human obesity without animal testing? The Adipose-on-Chip system offers a solution that allows scientists to gain better insights into various obesity-linked secondary diseases and comorbidities in the future.
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Image: Two female researchers examine the odor of a sample in a laboratory setting; Copyright: microgen@gmail.com

microgen@gmail.com

Digital nose facilitates early detection and diagnosis

22.06.2022

Many diseases can be treated successfully if they are diagnosed early. Research into a “digital (electronic) nose” is one promising development to facilitate early detection and diagnosis. That’s because body odors and their molecular composition are an early indicator of various diseases that often remain undetected in the early stages.
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Image: A woman lies in her bed with dim lighting, on the nightstand is a small box that monitors her sleep; Copyright: Sleepiz AG

Sleepiz AG

Sleep screening: Sleepiz is your contactless at-home sleep laboratory

23.05.2022

People around the world suffer from sleep disorders. Some conditions like sleep apnea or chronic respiratory disease can lead to serious health problems. Patients require medical long-term monitoring, but it’s currently not an easy feat. Graduates of ETH Zurich and the University of St. Gallen plan to change that and developed Sleepiz.
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Sonography training – Inexpensive models from the 3D printer

23.05.2022

Many medical disciplines rely on the tenet "Practice makes perfect". Sonography diagnostics is one of them. Unfortunately, constant training can be difficult, as patients with specific diseases are not present at a hospital all the time. The University Hospital Bonn is creating a solution for this problem: 3D printed models of joints and arteries are used in training.
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Image: A young woman with a fever thermometer sits in front of her laptop and has an online conversation with her doctor; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andriy Popov

PantherMedia/Andriy Popov

Telemedicine as an alternative: contactless and secure diagnoses

01.04.2022

Concrete diagnoses are the be-all and end-all in medicine. The Corona pandemic made the conditions for good diagnostics more difficult. Telemedicine offers an alternative - not only in times of pandemic. It is important to exploit the full potential of technical possibilities. Robot-assisted examinations and artificial intelligence can make an important contribution to symptom recognition.
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Image: Patient having a throat examination performed by the remote-controlled robot; Copyright: TU Munich

TUM

Telediagnostic solutions: expert exams with no physical contact

01.04.2022

Applications of telemedicine surged in popularity in efforts to reduce the COVID-19 infection risk for both medical professionals and patients. Unfortunately, the services typically lack a proper diagnostic option.
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Image: A woman with glasses and white hair is solving some tasks on a sheet of paper; Copyright: PantherMedia/microgen

PantherMedia/happysuthida

Dementia: "We want to achieve earlier diagnosis for more people"

29.03.2022

As we get older, we tend to become more forgetful, sometimes strange or even confused and overwhelmed by everyday life. But is it always just the age? With an increasing lifespan, the possibility to suffer from a cognitive disease at one point is also increasing. The majority of cognitive diseases is never diagnosed.
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Image: woman lying on a treatment bed performing strengthening exercises with the assistance of a medical professional standing at the side; Copyright: PantherMedia / Andriy Popov

PantherMedia / Andriy Popov

How prepared are we to treat patients with Long COVID?

15.03.2022

Most people who have been treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) recover completely within a few weeks. But for some people, symptoms can persist, requiring treatment for what is known as long COVID. The goal is to find better treatment options and implement them in rehabilitation centers.
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Image: two people looking at an ECG; Copyright: PantherMedia/photographee.eu

PantherMedia/photographee.eu

Diagnostics as a service: stroke prevention with the dpv-ritmo system

01.03.2022

Atrial Fibrillation is the most common type of persistent heart arrhythmia, affecting around half a million Germans alone. People with atrial fibrillation have a greater risk for ischemic stroke, making early and effective treatment critical to prevent serious complications. Unfortunately, many patients don’t even know they have atrial Fibrillation.
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Image: Care workers in overalls in a patient room; Copyright: PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia ltd

PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia ltd

Better management of hospital resources in pandemic times through DNA measurement

15.02.2022

For nearly two years, the COVID-19 pandemic has kept a firm grip on the world and caused many intensive care units to hit full capacity. It would help medical professionals tremendously if they could make a reliable prognosis the moment patients are hospitalized. cfDNA screening could play an important role in the assessment of COVID-19 severity in patients.
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Image: Cartoon for the Konectom App; Copyright: Phil Hubbe/ZKN

Phil Hubbe/ZKN

Konectom: App supports self-management of Multiple Sclerosis

08.02.2022

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous systems that requires regular checkups with the neurologist every three months. However, an exacerbation of MS, also known as a flare-up, can occur between these appointments. The Konectom smartphone app aims to close this diagnostic gap.
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Image: CT scan of the abdomen with two red markers; Copyright: PantherMedia/stockdevil_666

PantherMedia/stockdevil_666

Computed tomography: Digital signals with photon-counting CT

01.02.2022

Does medicine get digital when we scan in diagnostic findings and digitize them in the process? It obviously is more efficient to record data directly in digital form, but not all diagnostic tools have this option. Computed tomography has now made enormous progress in this area: Unlike conventional CT technology, the new photon-counting CT directly creates digital image data.
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Image: The Harmony COVID-19 test; Copyright: Mark Stone/University of Washington

Mark Stone/University of Washington

Fast and cheap test can detect COVID-19 virus' genome without need for PCR

25.01.2022

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new test for COVID-19 that combines the speed of over-the-counter antigen tests with the accuracy of PCR tests that are processed in medical labs and hospitals.
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Image: A person with a smartphone in hand is standing in front of a computer-generated model of the liver; Copyright: PantherMedia/happysuthida

PantherMedia/happysuthida

AI-driven laboratory diagnostics with medicalvalues

25.01.2022

Lab results are often complex and not easy to interpret. For many diseases, a medical diagnosis requires the analysis and combination of different values. That’s why one of the themes at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM at MEDICA 2021 highlighted "Integrative and AI-driven diagnostics" - and illustrated how AI can help interpret laboratory results and values.
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Image: A sensor with an attached cable in a man’s hand; Copyright: TU Hamburg/Institut Smart Sensors

TU Hamburg/Institut Smart Sensors

Ballistocardiography: Cardiac monitoring of astronauts

24.01.2022

It is an exciting time for space exploration: Will there be more space stations, lunar outposts, or Mars missions in the future? No matter where they are in space, lack of gravity causes astronauts to lose muscle mass during their missions. Even the fittest among them lose heart muscle. An experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) plans to detect whether sensors show heart changes.
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Image: A person in a lab coat is holding a device with an antenna extended into a glass; Coypright: Universität des Saarlandes

Universität des Saarlandes

Coronavirus: Using odors to detect an infection

10.01.2022

Rapid COVID-19 tests can be rather uncomfortable as samples are typically collected with a deep nasal or throat swab. Scientists now explore an alternative to rapid diagnostic tests based on a patient’s breath.
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Image: PASPORT, a new saliva-based COVID-19 ART test; Copyright: Duke-NUS Medical School

Duke-NUS Medical School

COVID-19 saliva Amplified Antigen Rapid Test is as sensitive as PCR test

09.12.2021

A potentially game-changing Antigen Rapid Test (ART) technology to diagnose COVID-19 has been developed by scientists in Singapore. Using a proprietary on-kit amplification technique, a person's saliva can be self-administered or tested for the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Image: a woman is getting her eyes scanned for diseases; Copyright: PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

Deep Learning: How artificial neural networks can support diagnostics

03.12.2021

The use of artificial intelligence and deep learning in medical diagnostics is growing rapidly. Ubotica’s neural network is based on deep learning and detects the presence of diabetic retinopathy in retinal images. Dr. Holger Pfeifer talks about the project successes, and reveals the obstacles researchers must continue to overcome in adopting deep learning systems.
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Image: A microsensor in the eye of a man enables self-measurement; Copyright: Implandata

Glaucoma: Microimplant monitors intraocular pressure

01.12.2021

Chronic conditions require close monitoring to ensure a successful therapeutic outcome. Unfortunately, patients aren't always able to perform their own measurements and the exam intervals between appointments are frequently too long. An innovative implant is designed to address this gap in glaucoma care and treatment and enable patients to make intraocular pressure measurements on their own.
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The laboratory industry between Corona and AI

17.11.2021

The laboratory industry is currently in commotion: the whole world is watching when it comes to news from the Corona pandemic. But tests and the sequencing of new variants are not the only stress factors: robotics, networking and AI are finding their ways into laboratories and turn existing processes upside down. We talked to some of the exhibitors at MEDICA 2021 about this.
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Image: The new procedure is intended to detect the causes of back problems more efficiently; Copyright: SZB

SZB

Back problems: AI will provide personalised diagnosis

02.11.2021

Back problems are generally regarded as a widespread disease with many sufferers struggling with pain. A team of researchers from TU Kaiserslautern, the University Medical Centre in Mainz and several companies is working on a method that will enable more efficient monitoring of malpositions and strains on the back. Artificial intelligence methods are also being used.
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Image: lexandra Hansard, Sanjay Gokhale and George Alexandrakis; Copyright: UT Arlington

UT Arlington

Wearable device could reduce racial disparities in blood measurements

29.10.2021

Bioengineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Arlington, in collaboration with Austin’s Shani Biotechnologies, LLC, have developed a new noninvasive technology that may help real-time monitoring of key blood parameters, such as hemoglobin, especially in Black patients.
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Image: Professor Dr Peter Hillemanns and PD Dr Matthias Jentschke with the HPV self-tests; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Prevention of cervical cancer with HPV self-testing

28.10.2021

Cervical cancer is one of the most common diseases of the female reproductive organs. Human papilloma viruses are almost always responsible for cervical cancer and the corresponding precancerous lesions. As part of the statutory preventive medical check-up, women from the age of 20 can have a cell smear taken from the cervix once a year, the so-called Pap test, to detect cell changes.
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Image: The researchers incorporated their sensor into a prototype with a fiber optic tip that can detect changes in fluorescence in the test sample; Copyright: MIT

MIT

Carbon nanotube-based sensor can detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins

26.10.2021

Using specialized carbon nanotubes, MIT engineers have designed a novel sensor that can detect SARS-CoV-2 without any antibodies, giving a result within minutes. Their new sensor is based on technology that can quickly generate rapid and accurate diagnostics, not just for Covid-19 but for future pandemics, the researchers say.
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Image: Preview picture of video

LampSeq – Scalable and cost-effective mass test

15.10.2021

Vaccinations and tests once again enable safe gatherings during the Corona pandemic. But unfortunately, existing test technologies are not suitable for every situation: A lot of time is lost for example due to testing at schools and the workplace. Now the University Hospital Bonn has developed a new kind of test which has numerous advantages over existing technologies.
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Image: Ion track nanotechnology from GSI Materials Research creates a highly sensitive nanopore.; Copyright: GSI/FAIR

GSI/FAIR

New sensor for SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses based on GSI nanotechnology

12.10.2021

Easy and fast detection of viruses are crucial in a pandemic. Based on single-nanopore membranes of GSI, an international interdisciplinary team of researchers developed a test method that detects SARS-CoV-2 in saliva, without sample pretreatment, with the same sensitivity as a qPCR test, and in only 2 hours. On top, the sensor can distinguish infectious from non-infectious corona viruses.
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Image: a robot arm transporting a petri dish; Copyright: PantherMedia / angellodeco

PantherMedia / angellodeco

The smart lab: The shift to more digitization is picking up speed

01.10.2021

They have probably never been in the spotlight as much as during the pandemic: laboratories. In Germany alone, around 73 million COVID-19-tests have been evaluated since the beginning of 2020. And even away from Corona, laboratory physicians have a lot to do – blood, urine and aspirates have to be evaluated every day. That results in an enormous amount of work, just in terms of organization.
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Image: Data sheets and ampoules on a desk; Copyright: PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

Diligent helpers in data analysis: How AI becomes transparent and reproducible

01.10.2021

Huge amounts of data are generated in the laboratory every day, which have to be analyzed by hand. This is where artificial intelligence (AI) comes into play as a perfect helper: Because it evaluates such data volumes faster than humans ever could. The only problem with AI is: when it is developed, there is hardly any guideline or standard that makes AI systems comparable with each other.
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Image: Portable genomics device; Copyright: Philippine Genome Center Mindanao

Philippine Genome Center Mindanao

SARS-CoV-2: portable sequencing platform for developing countries

02.09.2021

Philippine Genome Center Mindanao (PGC Mindanao) has partnered with Accessible Genomics, a group of volunteering scientists from all around the world to implement a low start-up cost genomic sequencing platform for laboratories in developing countries.
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Image: Two men in white shirs - Kazuki Takahashi, Manabu Tokeshi; Copyright: Manabu Tokeshi

Manabu Tokeshi

SARS-CoV-2: rapid method to quantify antibodies

29.07.2021

Scientists have developed a rapid, highly accurate test to detect antibodies against the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in human serum, opening a new avenue for understanding the full extent of the pandemic and evaluating the effectiveness of vaccines.
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Image: Four men next to a CT - Peter Brotchie, Dr. Ruwan Tennakoon, Prof. John Thangarajah, Dr. Mark Page; Copyright: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

New AI tech for early detection of prostate cancer

16.07.2021

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer and a leading cause of death by cancer in Australian men. Early detection is key to successful treatment, but men often dodge the doctor, avoiding diagnosis tests until it is too late.
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Image: A young man holding a rapid test for the Corona virus in one hand; Copyright: PantherMedia/Patrick Daxenbichler

PantherMedia/Patrick Daxenbichler

Research finds ways to improve accuracy of Lateral Flow Tests

24.06.2021

Research published in the journal ACS Materials and Interfaces has provided new understanding of how false-negative results in Lateral Flow Tests occur and provides opportunity for simple improvements to be made.
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Image: A sleeping woman; Copyright: PantherMedia/fizkes

PantherMedia/fizkes

Wearable EEG gathers reliable sleep data from the ear

16.06.2021

Preliminary results of a new study show that a wearable electroencephalogram device that gathers data from the ear measures sleep as reliably as traditional EEG electrodes attached to the scalp.
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Image: An emergency operation with ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia / HayDmitriy

PantherMedia / HayDmitriy

Point-of-care ultrasound helps in emergency diagnosis

01.06.2021

Medical emergencies require quick action and prompt decisions: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a valuable diagnostic tool available to the emergency physician. Rather than relying on his/her gut feeling, the device answers specific clinical questions that narrow differentials. The question is, in which settings does POCUS deliver the biggest benefits?
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Image: A swab is lying across a sample vial; Copyright: PantherMedia/fotoquique

Point-of-care tests: rapid diagnosis in emergency situations

01.06.2021

In emergency medicine, a faster diagnosis leads to a faster treatment of the patient. Point-of-care test solutions can provide immediate on-site insights into the patient’s condition. COVID-19 adds another dimension: the devices can provide a level of security and safety – one that goes beyond intensive care.
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Image: An emergency physician is measuring the blood pressure of an injured boy on a stretcher; Copyright: PantherMedia/Arne Trautmann

Emergency medicine: point-of-care diagnostic at the deployment site

01.06.2021

The sooner diagnosis can be made during an emergency, the faster the patient receives help. While most diagnostics still take place at the hospital, emergency physicians use more and more mobile devices directly at the deployment site. This is how they can save precious time. We take a look at some point-of-care applications in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Close-up of an ultrasound head in the gloved hand of a physician; Copyright: PantherMedia/Bork

Faster treatment thanks to point-of-care diagnostics – in emergencies and beyond

01.06.2021

Making an informed and immediate treatment decision near or at the patient’s bedside – point-of-care testing (also known as POCT) makes this possible. Unlike stationary devices, special exam rooms or other service infrastructure, POC diagnostic devices offer a multitude of benefits including more flexibility, faster results, and lower costs.
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Image: tiny PCR chip; Copyright: Adapted from ACS Nano 2021, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c02154

Adapted from ACS Nano 2021, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c02154

Ultrafast, on-chip PCR to speed diagnosis during pandemics

28.05.2021

Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been the gold standard for diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the PCR portion of the test requires bulky, expensive machines and takes about an hour to complete, making it difficult to quickly diagnose someone at a testing site.
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Treatment table in an intensive care unit in a hospital; Copyright: PantherMedia / sudok1

PantherMedia / sudok1

Smart Expert System Assists Medical Diagnostics

12.05.2021

A current research project develops a system designed to support critical care physicians in the future. The research project "A Learning and Interoperable Smart Expert System for Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine (ELISE)" uses data collected via machine learning algorithms to assist diagnostic decision-making.
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Image: Physician looking at the print-out of an ECG curve next to a patient; Copyright: PantherMedia/voenkor

PantherMedia/voenkor

FDA: Breakthrough Device Designation to ECG analysis platform

07.04.2021

Tempus, a leader in artificial intelligence and precision medicine, announces that the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company Breakthrough Device Designation for its ECG Analysis Platform.
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Image: Rescue team in action; Copyright: PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

Mobile and intelligent – emergency blood analysis

08.03.2021

Things need to move fast in an emergency. Making the right call in this setting can be a challenge for emergency medical services – especially when symptoms are ambiguous, which is the case if a patient has difficulty breathing or exhibits a cardiovascular or poisoning emergency. A blood analysis is paramount to deliver a fast and accurate diagnosis. This is where mobOx comes in.
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Image: stretchy skin patch; Copyright: Wang lab/UC San Diego

Wang lab/UC San Diego

Wearables: skin patch as an all-in-one health monitor

17.02.2021

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer's levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the human body at the same time.
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Image: Two people looking at a smartwatch; Copyright: PantherMedia/DraginImages

PantherMedia/DraginImages

Wearables can detect COVID-19 symptoms and predict diagnosis

09.02.2021

Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, Mount Sinai researchers report in one of the first studies on the topic. The findings were published in Journal of Medical Internet Research.
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Image: Asthma monitoring device is taped to the chest; Copyright: Respia

Breathe a sigh of relief with Respia

01.01.2021

There are many different kinds of mobile devices to help people with chronic diseases. Asthma is one of those diseases, which can be monitored with wearables to improve everyday life. Especially for parents, the stress and anxiety which come with asthma-afflicted children can be reduced with a reliable solution like Respia.
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Image: Sense Glucose Earring on a model; Copyright: The University of Huddersfield

The University of Huddersfield

Sense Glucose Earring for managing type 1 diabetes

10.12.2020

A product design graduate from the University of Huddersfield has defeated thousands of entries from around the world to become one of the finalists of the 2020 Global Grad Show with their design for a discrete earring that monitors blood sugar levels and delivers feedback in real-time.
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Image: lung sound recording device; Copyright: TU Graz

TU Graz

COVID-19: Screening system for lung sound analysis

08.12.2020

Our bodies constantly make sounds that are not always audible to the naked ear. The occurrence of certain noises or changes in normal sounds can be an indication of illness. Using the example of the lung, a research team at Graz University of Technology has been intensively engaged in noise recording and the development of computer-aided analysis methods as a supplement to medical diagnosis.
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Image: View into an automated laboratory machine that stores a lot of vials; Copyright: PantherMedia/kagemusha

The smart networking laboratory: when connected devices become one system

01.09.2020

Diagnostics, biomedical research, screening active ingredient candidates - laboratories perform many functions and must be flexible. Growing and evolving healthcare demands mean labs have to process an increasing number of samples. Modern laboratory information management systems can already support high-throughput, but a smart laboratory environment can make things even more efficient.
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Image: Two people wearing protective suits stand next to a workbench in a laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT/Foto Bernd Müller

Fraunhofer IBMT/Foto Bernd Müller

epiLab: Coronavirus testing in the mobile safety laboratory

08.07.2020

A key to preventing SARS-CoV-2 spread is frequent, comprehensive testing. This allows the early detection of infections and helps break the chain of infection. It always comes down to Coronavirus testing capacity. In Germany's southwest state of Saarland, the mobile epiLab (epidemiological laboratory) supports the search for infections lurking in nursing homes and long-term care facilities.
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02.06.2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: Transmission of medical data of an athlete to a laptop; Copyright: PantherMedia / Viktor Cap

PantherMedia / Viktor Cap

Sports medicine software: Monitoring at the push of a button

22.05.2020

Athletes not only have to be fit and stay in shape, but they also have to achieve peak performance, especially when they get ready for athletic events. Optimized and individualized performance training requires data from external laboratories and institutes. The [i/med] Sports platform from DORNER Health IT Solutions provides a complete workflow − from anamnesis to diagnostic report.
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Image: Smiling man is standing in nature with one had at his ear; Copyright: panthermedia.net/cristalov

panthermedia.net/cristalov

In-ear sensors for monitoring vital parameters

22.04.2020

Wearables offer practical solutions for the flexible measurement of data. The sensor from cosinuss° is worn directly in the ear and offers a precise monitoring of vital parameters.
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Image: young woman makes an ultrasound with the new system and shows patient the image on her smartphone; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Ultrasound to go: versatile partner on hospital rounds

08.04.2020

The University Hospital Bonn has recently introduced an ultrasound device that's small enough to fit in your coat pocket. It's ready to use once you have connected it to a tablet or smartphone. The portable system makes bedside physical exams possible. The device primarily benefits students as it allows them to combine basic knowledge and clinical application.
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Image: man holding his finger to the smartphone camera; Copyright: FibriCheck

Smartphone app detects cardiac arrhythmia

03.03.2020

Atrial fibrillation is one of the causes for a stroke and often appears without any previous indications. To reduce the risks and provide fast results, the application FibriCheck was invented. With the app it is possible to collect and measure data via smartphone camera.
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Image: Man sitting next to an older woman wearing vr glasses on a couch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/draoscondreaw

panthermedia.net/draoscondreaw

Sensor-Based Smart Glove Enables Parkinson's Diagnosis

25.02.2020

Neurological disorders like Parkinson's are often diagnosed once the disease has already progressed to a later stage. The VAFES project was initiated to facilitate an early detection. Sensor technology and VR are used in the creation of a playful test system.
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Image: person holding hand to the heart with a graphic depiction of a heart in front of them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/suriyaphoto

Cardisiography: A Non-Invasive Heart Screening Test

03.02.2020

Coronary heart disease can come as a complete surprise and occur suddenly. Cardisiography was designed to lower the risk and make faster intervention possible. As a non-invasive heart screening test, cardisiography offers the possibility of early detection for heart diseases.
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Image: Endoscope capsule (left) next to an endoscope tube (right); Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

panthermedia.net/phonlamai

A new type of endoscopy – small, easy, comfortable

22.01.2020

Patients have to undergo a gastroscopy to rule out gastrointestinal conditions. Many dread this procedure since a thin, flexible tube is being pushed through the esophagus and stomach. Ovesco Endoscopy AG has teamed up with other project partners in the nuEndo research project to develop a capsule endoscopy device that is tiny, easy to swallow and makes the test more comfortable for the patient.
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Image: Preview picture of video

AI in the hospital – Possibilities and limits

17.01.2020

A hospital generates several thousands of gigabytes of data each day. The growing flood of data is no longer manageable for doctors. The great hope: artificial intelligence. Radiology is the main beneficiary. Dr. Felix Nensa from Essen University Hospital and Dr. Peter Langkafel from the Digital Health Factory tell us more about the possibilities and limits of learning machines.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12.12.2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02.12.2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04.11.2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
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Image: A physician is standing in front of a floating image of the brain and is touching one point; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Igor Vetushko

Medicine 5.0: machine learning algorithms in healthcare

04.11.2019

Artificial intelligence holds the promise of salvation when it comes to medicine: it is meant to unburden medical professionals, save time and money and perform tasks reliably and tirelessly. But before AI algorithms are allowed to diagnose diseases, many technical and ethical questions still need answers.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04.11.2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: two athletes at the startline for a race; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

Sports Hub project changes sports medicine with big data and AI

22.10.2019

Professor Jarek Krajewski sat down for a MEDICA interview and delivered a detailed description of the Sports Hub project. It highlights how big data and AI transform the world of sports medicine. The project delivers new insights and provides a versatile database.
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Image: Modern diabetes therapies; Copyright: beta-web GmbH

Digital and personalized diabetes management

21.10.2019

Digital blood glucose measurement via a sensor on the arm, glucose values in an app and data evaluation with the help of software: diabetes experts, product specialists at Roche Diabetes Care Germany and a patient talk in our report on MEDICA.de about the future of diabetes treatment.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08.10.2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Connection of medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019: Experience tomorrow's innovations today

01.10.2019

The medical market is booming - medical ideas and visions for the future are more in demand than ever. Especially at MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019 young founders want to present their product innovations. Develop business contacts, meet investors and experience an international environment in just one place. Discover in our Topic of the Month what makes MEDICA START-UP PARK unique.
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Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01.10.2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01.10.2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: A biker is riding on rocky ground in a steppe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Daxiao Productions

panthermedia.net/Daxiao Productions

Triathlete Sebastian Kienle: wearables and body awareness improve athletic performance

09.09.2019

A 2.4-mile (3.86 km) swim, a 112-mile (180.25 km) bicycle ride and a marathon 26.22-mile (42.20 km) run – that’s the Ironman Triathlon. Triathletes like Sebastian Kienle are constantly working to push beyond their limits. At the 7th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE on November 20 - 21, you can meet Kienle in person.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02.09.2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02.09.2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02.09.2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22.08.2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08.08.2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01.08.2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01.08.2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01.07.2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01.07.2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01.07.2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: Preview picture of video

Functional Imaging: The puls of modern oncology

17.06.2019

Medical imaging techniques have developed considerably in recent decades. In addition to morphological imaging techniques more and more functional imaging techniques are used in oncology that can continously record the functions of specific organs locally and regionally in real time. These are groundbreaking for diagnostics, therapies and preoperative preparations.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23.04.2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01.03.2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01.03.2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
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Endoprostheses - Ultrasound to detect loosening?

27.02.2019

Many patients suffering from arthrosis or other kinds of damage in the hip joint need an endoprosthesis at some point. However, this prosthesis can loosen again after some time, so that it must be replaced. In order to delay this replacement surgery for as long as possible, the TH Mittelhessen University of Applied Sciences develops a new diagnostic method.
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Where imaging and radiation meet – Radiotherapy with the MR-Linac

13.02.2019

In conventional radiotherapy, the tumor is first localized using CT and MRT images in order to calculate the irradiated areas. The major drawback in this case: the subsequent radiation only shows bone structures in the body but not the tumor itself. As a result, the radiated area is often larger than necessary. In our video you will learn how the MR-Linac can be used for more precise radiotherapy.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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