Image: (Microscopic image) Fusion of ruptured vesicles, colored green and pink; Copyright: Loyola University Chicago

Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases share common crucial feature

26/05/2017

A Loyola University Chicago study has found that abnormal proteins found in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease all share a similar ability to cause damage when they invade brain cells.
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Image: Microscopic image of vesicles; Copyright: Norm Haughey's laboratory

How the injured brain tells the body it's hurt

19/05/2017

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new way that cells in the brain alert the rest of the body to recruit immune cells when the brain is injured. The work was completed in mouse models that mimic infection, stroke or trauma in humans.
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Image: A close-up picture of a big black mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdigitall

Microscopic technique could help detect, diagnose metastatic melanomas

12/05/2017

The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. For years, melanoma researchers have studied samples that were considered uniform in size and color, making them easier to examine by more conventional means. But melanomas do not always come in the same shape and hue; often, melanomas are irregular and dark, making them difficult to investigate.
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Image: A green network of nerve cells on black ground; Copyright: Dina Popova

Novel method to detect toxic effects of chemicals

28/04/2017

Traditional toxicological investigations performed on animals (in vivo) are expensive, time-consuming and may cause animal suffering. But research from Umeå University demonstrates that a neuronal cell model, derived from mouse, can be used to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of chemicals.
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Image: Graphical rendering of a protein structure; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Leonid Andronov

Rapid screening machine can read and separate protein sequences

27/04/2017

The structural properties of proteins that could eventually become important materials for manufacturing and medicine are revealed by a novel optical technique that works rapidly to sort through amino acid sequences even inside living bacteria, according to a team of engineers.
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Image: A tablet, written on it are the words

Research moves closer to unravelling mystery cause of multiple sclerosis

24/04/2017

A new study has made a major new discovery towards finding the cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), potentially paving the way for research to investigate new treatments. Ahead of MS Awareness Week an international team has discovered a new cellular mechanism that may cause the disease, and a potential hallmark that may be a target for future treatment of the autoimmune disorder.
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Image: Cells under a microscope; Copyright: Jia Xie, Lerner Lab

New approach makes cells resistant to HIV

12/04/2017

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a way to tether HIV-fighting antibodies to immune cells, creating a cell population resistant to the virus. Their experiments under lab conditions show that these resistant cells can quickly replace diseased cells, potentially curing the disease in a person with HIV.
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Image: Graphic of a protein complex; Copyright: MIPT Press Office

One step closer to cracking the mystery of bacterial adaptation to antibiotics

11/04/2017

An international team of researchers has proposed an explanation of the way bacteria process external signals. By identifying the detailed structure of the protein complex used by bacteria, the scientists gained insights into the ability of these microorganisms to detect even small changes in the environment and adapt to them. The research findings were published in "Scientific Reports".
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Image: a cell structure in blue; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ralwel

How to hack a cell

07/04/2017

The human body is made up of trillions of cells, microscopic computers that carry out complex behaviors according to the signals they receive from each other and their environment. Synthetic biologists engineer living cells to control how they behave by converting their genes into programmable circuits.
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Image: A graphic showing a correlation between errors in DNA and protein structure; Copyright: KIT

Big Data approach to predict protein structure

28/03/2017

Proteins are the molecular all-rounders in our cells. If they do not work properly, severe diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, may result. To develop methods to repair malfunctioning proteins, their structure has to be known. Using a big data approach, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to predict protein structures.
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Image: Computer-generated image of a DNA helix where a long molecule is attached; Copyright: Juan J. Nogueira, University of Vienna

How do metals interact with DNA?

27/03/2017

To fight cancer, every year thousands of chemical substances are screened for their potential effects on tumor cells. Once a compound able to inhibit cancer cell growth is found, it still takes several years of research until the drug gets approved and can be applied to patients.
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Image: Graphical rendering of antibodies attacking cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ugreen

New drug delivery method for cancer therapy

23/03/2017

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a new drug delivery method that produces strong results in treating cancers in animal models, including some hard-to-treat solid and liquid tumors.
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Image: A wooden doll with a painted networks of dots and acupuncture needles on it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fotohunter

Electroacupuncture releases stem cells

22/03/2017

A study led by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers demonstrates how electroacupuncture triggers a neurological mechanism that can help promote tissue repair and relieve injury-induced pain.
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Image: Structural models of two proteins; Copyright: Hiroshima University

"Smart" genetic library – making disease diagnosis much easier

15/03/2017

Researchers at Hiroshima University have developed a smart genetic reference library for locating and weeding out disease-causing mutations in populations.
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Image: Two men standing infront of a blackboard; Copyright: University of Michigan

Can math help explain our bodies - and our diseases?

06/03/2017

What makes a cluster of cells become a liver, or a muscle? How do our genes give rise to proteins, proteins to cells, and cells to tissues and organs? The incredible complexity of how these biological systems interact boggles the mind - and drives the work of biomedical scientists around the world.
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Image: Computer generated graphic of red blood cells inside a blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jelena Jovanovic

How blood can be rejuvenated

01/03/2017

Our blood stem cells generate around a thousand billion new blood cells every day. But the blood stem cells’ capacity to produce blood changes as we age. This leads to older people being more susceptible to anaemia, lowered immunity and a greater risk of developing certain kinds of blood cancer.
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Image: Different images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tushchakorn

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain

01/03/2017

For the first time ever, a single flexible fiber no bigger than a human hair has successfully delivered a combination of optical, electrical, and chemical signals back and forth into the brain, putting into practice an idea first proposed two years ago.
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Image: Hands of a physician who is performing a urine test with a test strip; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Esben Hansen

Diabetic kidney disease is decoded

27/02/2017

Diabetes is a leading cause of kidney disease, a serious, often fatal complication that is difficult to diagnose in early, potentially treatable stages. Now, a research team at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has revealed biological pathways involved in diabetic kidney disease, providing hope that both early diagnostic tests and targeted treatment can be designed.
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