Public Health & Associations -- MEDICA Trade Fair

Image: heaps of vegetables, one hand holding a blood glucose meter; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dml5050

Biomarkers in the blood prove strong role of food for type 2 diabetes

18/09/2017

A pioneering method, developed at Chalmers University of Technology, has demonstrated its potential in a large study, showing that metabolic fingerprints from blood samples could render important new knowledge on the connection between food and health. The study finds that diet is one of the strongest predictors of type 2 diabetes risk in older women.
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Image: Breast cancer stem cell line 1 (BCSC1) from the newly established cell model; Copyright: Maurer Lab

Researchers found a possible new treatment for aggressive triple receptor-negative breast cancer

18/09/2017

Scientists from the cluster of excellence BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies at the University of Freiburg and the Freiburg University Medical Center have shown that inhibiting the epigenetic regulator KDM4 might offer a potential novel treatment option for breast cancer patients.
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Image: red blood cells; copyright: panthermedia.net/forsaken-art

Study identifies multiple roles of glucose metabolism in platelet activation and survival

14/09/2017

Research may inform how increased glucose metabolism may contribute to the increased risk of thrombosis in diabetes and how altering platelet glucose metabolism influences platelet function
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Image: cross-section of a blood vessel; copyright: panthermedia.net/Dr. Lange

Correlation between height and risk of thrombosis

14/09/2017

In a new study from Lund University in Sweden, researchers investigated the risk factors for blood clots, i.e. venous thromboembolism (VTE). The results show a strong correlation between height and VTE risk for both women and men. The risk increases with height.
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Image: sheet of paper with the word cancer on it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stanciuc

From bed to bench and back to bed: Mimicking how HPV-positive cancer responds to treatment

11/09/2017

Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who are positive for human papilloma virus (HPV-positive) have been observed to respond significantly better to chemo-radiotherapy than HPV-negative patients. This observation is surprising because HPV infection leads to an increased risk of developing oropharyngeal cancer. To date, the reason for this dichotomy has not been well understood.
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Image: venes and arteries; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Spectral

How new blood vessels sprout

11/09/2017

IBS biologists discovered a key regulator of normal as well as pathological formation of new blood vessels.
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Image: a sleeping newborn; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mschlake

The brains of newborns distinguish between caresses

25/08/2017

The ability to distinguish between different kinds of caresses on the skin already exists at a very early age. This is evident from a study by the Sahlgrenska Academy, in which the blood supply in brains of infants 6 to 10 weeks old was investigated.
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Image: hand and blood sugar measuring device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gisne

Transforming skin cells to insulin

14/08/2017

Researchers at the University of Bergen have transformed skin puncture cells from diabetes patients into insulin producing cells, using stem cell techniques. The researchers' aim is to transplant these cells under the skin of people with diabetes.
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Image: person holding his head, with flames around him; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sangoiri

In the test tube instead of under the knife

04/08/2017

Freiburg neuroscientists develop new forms of diagnosis and therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy.
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Image: blank patient files with only the words

Immune system may mount an attack in Parkinson's disease

04/08/2017

A new study suggests that T cells, which help the body's immune system recognize friend from foe, may play an important role in Parkinson's disease (PD). The study, published in the journal Nature, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.
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Image: Malaria mosquito; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Pettigrew

Malaria already endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman period

03/08/2017

Malaria was already widespread on Sardinia by the Roman period, long before the Middle Ages, as indicated by research at the Institute of Evolutionary Medicine of the University of Zurich with the help of a Roman who died 2,000 years ago.
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Cell mechanism discovery could lead to "fundamental" change in leukemia treatment

01/08/2017

Researchers have identified a new cell mechanism that could lead to a fundamental change in the diagnosis and treatment of leukaemia.
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Image: human body with arteries and venes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Pixelchaos

Tracking the mechanism of artery formation

01/08/2017

Arteriogenesis is a critical event – not only during development but also in adult life. Cardiovascular life-threatening events could be overcome for example by inducing the formation of new arteries. A team of scientists led by Ralf Adams from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine has developed a genetic approach in mice to uncover molecular mechanisms of arterial growth.
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Image: hand erasing a sketch of a human brain; copyright: panthermedia.net/Andreus

Blood test IDs key Alzheimer's marker

20/07/2017

Decades before people with Alzheimer's disease develop memory loss and confusion, their brains become dotted with plaques made of a sticky protein - called amyloid beta - that is thought to contribute to the disease and its progression.
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Image: red blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Kößling

New gene mutation associated with Fanconi anemia

19/07/2017

Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by high cancer risk. Researchers of the University of Würzburg now have revealed a new Fanconi anemia gene that is involved in complex DNA repair processes and may also play a relevant role in cancer prevention.
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Image: flocking bacteria; copyright: panthermedia.net/Phil Morley

Bacteria never swim alone

19/07/2017

Many animal species display flocking behaviour, but the fact that microorganisms do, is not as well known. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that algae and bacteria form flocks at very low concentrations of individuals, a finding that could increase our future understanding of how the organisms infect their host animals.
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image: blood sugar monitoring device; copyright: panthermedia.net/hdcphoto

Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study shows

18/07/2017

People who were previously hospitalized for severe hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia are at highest risk for recurrent dysglycemic episodes in the short term (within 30 days of the prior episode) and over the long term.
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image: blood test ; copyright: panthermedia.net/Josef Müllek

Reliable diagnosis of celiac disease in children without endoscopy

17/07/2017

Over decades the diagnosis of celiac disease affecting about 1 percent of our children and adolescents required an upper endoscopy. Now a large international study – coordinated by the Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital in Munich – showed that in more than 50 percent of affected children, endoscopy can be omitted without reducing the accuracy of the diagnosis.
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Graphic: Different steps of the disease detection tool; Copyright: Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST)

Miniature technology, big hope for disease detection

13/07/2017

The field of medicine is always on the lookout for better disease diagnostic tools - simpler, faster, and cheaper technologies to enhance patient treatment and outcomes. Currently, microfluidic bioassay devices are the preferred diagnostic tools that allow clinicians to measure the concentration of disease biomarkers within a patient's biological sample, such as blood.
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Graphic: Rapid sepsis lab on a chip; Copyright: Janet Sinn-Hanlon

Quick test finds signs of sepsis in a single drop of blood

06/07/2017

A new portable device can quickly find markers of deadly, unpredictable sepsis infection from a single drop of blood. A team of researchers from the University of Illinois and Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Illinois, completed a clinical study of the device, which is the first to provide rapid, point-of-care measurement of the immune system's response, without any need to process the blood.
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