Image: Graphic of the human gastro-intestinal tract, with a device receiving energy from outside the body; Copyright: Ella Maru Studio / Giovanni Traverso / Abubakar Abid

Wireless power can drive electronic devices in the GI tract

11/05/2017

Imagers, gastric pacemakers and other diagnostic and therapeutic tools could someday transform the way diseases of the gastrointestinal tract are measured and treated. But in order for these electronic devices to work, they need a power source. Using mid-field wireless powering, investigators can transfer power from outside the body to electronics in the gastrointestinal tract.
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Image: The 3-D Printer used in this study ; Copyright: A.Osterwalder/EPFL

Control of molecular motion by metal-plated 3-D printed plastic pieces

01/05/2017

Many measurement techniques, such as spectroscopy, benefit from the ability to split a single beam of light into two in order to measure changes in one of them. The crucial device that separates the beam is the beam-splitter. These have been mostly limited to light beams, where one uses simply a partially reflective glass.
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Image: Optical antenna coupled to a scintillation cluster attached to the end of an optical fiber; Copyright: Miguel Angel Suarez, FEMTO-ST (CNRS / UFC / UTBM / ENSMM)

Mini X-ray sensor for high-precision medical applications

04/04/2017

The ability to detect X-rays on a tiny scale paves the way for high-precision medical imaging and therapies. Such detection capabilities have been achieved by researchers from the CNRS, the University of Franche-Comté (UFC), and Aix-Marseille University (AMU), who attached an X-ray sensor to the end of an optical fiber. Their work was published in "Optics Letters".
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Image: Physician is holding a pacemaker in his hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/PicsFive

Pacemakers and defibrillators safe for MRI using new protocol

28/02/2017

The MagnaSafe Registry, a new multicenter study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), has demonstrated that appropriately screened and monitored patients with standard or non-MRI-conditional pacemakers and defibrillators can undergo MRI at a field strength of 1.5 tesla without harm.
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