Image: A game board whith a brain painted on it. Around it lie some cards and pieces; Copyright: KU Leuven - Joris Snaet

Blind people have brain map for 'visual' observations too

22/05/2017

Is what you're looking at an object, a face, or a tree? When processing visual input, our brain uses different areas to recognize faces, body parts, scenes, and objects. Scientists at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have now shown that people who were born blind use a 'brain map' with a very similar layout to distinguish between these same categories.
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Image: Scheme of the human brain an nacrolepsy patient; Copyright: Kanazawa University

Identification of the neuronal suppressor of cataplexy, sudden weakening of muscle tone

15/05/2017

Sleep is of absolute necessity for us humans, although if one falls asleep all of a sudden while being awoken, it would cause a big trouble. The brain is equipped with sleep mechanism and wakefulness mechanism, which are regulated to be on or off in an adequate manner.
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Image: Graphic of a human brain with a tumor highlighted in red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Showing brain tumor firmness, adhesion before surgery

11/05/2017

It is not often that a fall saves someone's life. Helen Powell, 74, says that was the case for her. A computerized tomography scan that followed her fall revealed a cancerous brain tumor that led her to Mayo Clinic and surgery using first-in-the-world technology. Brain magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) imaging, showed the precise firmness of her tumor.
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Image: Neurosurgeons performing skull surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Marco Herrndorf

Future surgery may use an automated, robotic drill

10/05/2017

A computer-driven automated drill, similar to those used to machine auto parts, could play a pivotal role in future surgical procedures. The new machine can make one type of complex cranial surgery 50 times faster than standard procedures, decreasing from two hours to two and a half minutes.
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Image: A green network of nerve cells on black ground; Copyright: Dina Popova

Novel method to detect toxic effects of chemicals

28/04/2017

Traditional toxicological investigations performed on animals (in vivo) are expensive, time-consuming and may cause animal suffering. But research from Umeå University demonstrates that a neuronal cell model, derived from mouse, can be used to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of chemicals.
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Image: A tablet, written on it are the words

Research moves closer to unravelling mystery cause of multiple sclerosis

24/04/2017

A new study has made a major new discovery towards finding the cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), potentially paving the way for research to investigate new treatments. Ahead of MS Awareness Week an international team has discovered a new cellular mechanism that may cause the disease, and a potential hallmark that may be a target for future treatment of the autoimmune disorder.
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Image: Close-Up of the nanowire; Copyright: Integrated Electronics and Biointerfaces Laboratory, UC San Diego

'Neuron-reading' nanowires for neurological diseases

17/04/2017

A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. The new nanowire technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.
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Image: A paper, written on it

Cause of an inherited neurological disorder discovered

12/04/2017

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified the basis for how a single gene mutation can cause a rare neurological movement disorder known as dystonia. It can result from an injury or can be an inherited disorder in which patients progressively develop from childhood uncontrollable muscle contractions leading to repetitive movements and awkward and painful postures.
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Image: Two physicians performing a deep brain stimulation; Copyright: Joshua Bright

Deep brain stimulation decreases tics in young adults with severe Tourette syndrome

10/04/2017

A surgical technique that sends electrical impulses to a specific area of the brain reduces the "tics," or involuntary movements and vocal outbursts, experienced by young adults with severe cases of Tourette syndrome, according to a new study led by investigators from NYU Langone Medical Center.
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Image: Tea is being poured from a glass pot; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tankist276

Daily tea consumption protects elderly from cognitive decline

22/03/2017

Tea drinking reduces the risk of cognitive impairment in older persons by 50 per cent and as much as 86 per cent for those who are genetically at risk of Alzheimer's.
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Image: A wooden doll with a painted networks of dots and acupuncture needles on it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fotohunter

Electroacupuncture releases stem cells

22/03/2017

A study led by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers demonstrates how electroacupuncture triggers a neurological mechanism that can help promote tissue repair and relieve injury-induced pain.
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Image: A cell clinging to an uneven surface; Copyright: UC San Diego

New nano-implant could one day help restore sight

20/03/2017

A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light.
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Image: An old man sleeping in his bed; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Vadim Guzhva

Sound waves boost older adults' memory, deep sleep

09/03/2017

Gentle sound stimulation - such as the rush of a waterfall - synchronized to the rhythm of brain waves significantly enhanced deep sleep in older adults and improved their ability to recall words, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.
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Image: A computer-generated head, where the brain can be seen. The head is divides into different pieces; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lightsource

Researchers identify how inflammation spreads through the brain after injury

08/03/2017

Researchers have identified a new mechanism by which inflammation can spread throughout the brain after injury. This mechanism may explain the widespread and long-lasting inflammation that occurs after traumatic brain injury, and may play a role in other neurodegenerative diseases.
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Image: A girl holding her arm, having pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/teermanet thanomkiat

Functional brain training alleviates CIPN in cancer survivors

07/03/2017

A type of functional brain training known as neurofeedback shows promise in reducing symptoms of chemotherapy-induced nerve damage, or neuropathy, in cancer survivors, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The pilot study, published in the journal "Cancer", is the largest, to date, to determine the benefits of neurofeedback in cancer survivors.
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Image: Different images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tushchakorn

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain

01/03/2017

For the first time ever, a single flexible fiber no bigger than a human hair has successfully delivered a combination of optical, electrical, and chemical signals back and forth into the brain, putting into practice an idea first proposed two years ago.
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