Image: Drawing showing a paper strip with lines and symbols for molecules; Copyright: American Chemical Society

Paper test strip to monitor heart failure

29/05/2017

Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure does not mean the heart has stopped pumping – it is just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely.
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Image: Drop of blood on filter paper. Above it are two smaller blood drops and coin; Copyright: Jan Björkesten

Better, cheaper healthcare with dry blood samples

24/05/2017

A drop of blood on filter paper, allowed to dry and stored for future diagnostic purposes - considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes. In a new study, Uppsala researchers have successfully measured 92 different proteins in millimetre-sized circles punched out of dried samples.
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Image: A smiling man with glasses wearing a white coat - Dr. Eric Klein, M.D.; Copyright: Cleveland Clinic

New blood test is more accurate in predicting prostate cancer risk than PSA

17/05/2017

A team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and other clinical sites have demonstrated that a new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures - distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease.
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Image: A close-up picture of a big black mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdigitall

Microscopic technique could help detect, diagnose metastatic melanomas

12/05/2017

The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. For years, melanoma researchers have studied samples that were considered uniform in size and color, making them easier to examine by more conventional means. But melanomas do not always come in the same shape and hue; often, melanomas are irregular and dark, making them difficult to investigate.
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Image: Graphic of the human gastro-intestinal tract, with a device receiving energy from outside the body; Copyright: Ella Maru Studio / Giovanni Traverso / Abubakar Abid

Wireless power can drive electronic devices in the GI tract

11/05/2017

Imagers, gastric pacemakers and other diagnostic and therapeutic tools could someday transform the way diseases of the gastrointestinal tract are measured and treated. But in order for these electronic devices to work, they need a power source. Using mid-field wireless powering, investigators can transfer power from outside the body to electronics in the gastrointestinal tract.
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Image: A contact lense on a sheet of paper with the word

'Smart contact lens sensor' for diabetic and glaucoma diagnosis

08/05/2017

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has proposed the possibility of in situ human health monitoring simply by wearing a contact lens with built-in wireless smart sensors.
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Image: A green network of nerve cells on black ground; Copyright: Dina Popova

Novel method to detect toxic effects of chemicals

28/04/2017

Traditional toxicological investigations performed on animals (in vivo) are expensive, time-consuming and may cause animal suffering. But research from Umeå University demonstrates that a neuronal cell model, derived from mouse, can be used to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of chemicals.
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Image: Two ice cream cones next to each, one is filled with sugar, one with money; Copyright: panthermedia.net/elenachaykina

Significant economic burden from diabetes

28/04/2017

With more than 420 million affected individuals, as highlighted by the WHO Global report on diabetes issued for the 2016 World Diabetes Day, diabetes is among the leading metabolic diseases and a growing burden for health systems across the globe.
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Image: A preemie in an incubator; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ondrooo

Lab on a chip designed to minimize preterm births

27/04/2017

In the United States alone, a half million babies are born preterm; worldwide, the number is an estimated 15 million. Complications associated with preterm birth are the no. 1 cause of death for children under 5, and those who live often face a range of health problems.
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Image: Graphical rendering of a protein structure; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Leonid Andronov

Rapid screening machine can read and separate protein sequences

27/04/2017

The structural properties of proteins that could eventually become important materials for manufacturing and medicine are revealed by a novel optical technique that works rapidly to sort through amino acid sequences even inside living bacteria, according to a team of engineers.
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Image: (Close up) Many test tubes and one pipette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaidp

"Look into the Blood" – World Laboratory Day 2017

20/04/2017

Again, this year on April 23rd, the World Laboratory Day is celebrated. It addresses the general public and answers the different questions around the theme laboratory. For that reason, laboratories and laboratory schools worldwide are open for the interested public and allow a look into the world of the laboratory.
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Image: A computer graphic of cancer cells attacking a healthy cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitanovski

UTSA professor's study describes new way to predict tumor growth

19/04/2017

A new study by Yusheng Feng, professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes an algorithm that can predict the growth of cancerous tumors, which could help medical professionals judge the best treatment options for patients.
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Image: Three scientists in a laboratory; Copyright: The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth)

New technology can detect tiny ovarian tumors

14/04/2017

Most ovarian cancer is diagnosed at such late stages that patients' survival rates are poor. However, if the cancer is detected earlier, five-year survival rates can be greater than 90 percent. Now, MIT engineers have developed a far more sensitive way to reveal ovarian tumors.
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Image: (Black and white picture) An infant standing in his bed, the focus lies on his hand, the head is blurred; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Nontawat Thongsibsong

Blood test shows promise in detecting abusive head trauma in infants

13/04/2017

Researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have developed and refined a blood test that could help clinicians identify infants who may have had bleeding of the brain as a result of abusive head trauma, sometimes referred to as shaken baby syndrome. The science behind the test is described today in "JAMA Pediatrics".
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Image: A paper, written on it

Cause of an inherited neurological disorder discovered

12/04/2017

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified the basis for how a single gene mutation can cause a rare neurological movement disorder known as dystonia. It can result from an injury or can be an inherited disorder in which patients progressively develop from childhood uncontrollable muscle contractions leading to repetitive movements and awkward and painful postures.
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Image: Cluster of three circulating tumor cells; Copyright: Penn Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

31/03/2017

From using fluid in the lungs to better understand the potential of immunotherapy treatments in lung cancer, to tracking circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer, to conducting RNA sequencing of cancer cell clusters from the blood of pancreatic cancer patients, a series of studies from the University of Pennsylvania demonstrate the promise of new diagnostic methods.
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Image: Bottle for the new flu test; Copyright: KTH Royal Institute of Technology

New flu test easy as breathing, with faster results

30/03/2017

A method for diagnosing flu virus from breath samples could soon replace invasive nasal swabs and deliver better results faster. There's a short window for detecting influenza virus, because as the infection takes hold – the concentration of the virus lessens. So if the patient isn't tested soon after exposure, conventional methods run the risk of a giving a false negative result.
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Image: X-ray image of a human's lung, partly filled with fluid; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stockdevil_666

New approach uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs

27/03/2017

A team of engineering and medical researchers has found a way to use ultrasound to monitor fluid levels in the lung, offering a noninvasive way to track progress in treating pulmonary edema - fluid in the lungs - which often occurs in patients with congestive heart failure. The approach, which has been demonstrated in rats, also holds promise for diagnosing scarring, or fibrosis, in the lung.
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Image: The eye of an Asian man is scanned with a small camera; Copyright: Bailey Shen

A pocket-sized retina camera, no dilating required

23/03/2017

It is the part of the eye exam everyone hates: the pupil-dilating eye drops. The drops work by opening the pupil and preventing the iris from constricting in response to light and are often used for routine examination and photography of the back of the eye.
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Image: Computer-generated head with numbers floating around it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/agsandrew

Artificial intelligence virtual consultant helps deliver better patient care

09/03/2017

Interventional radiologists at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) are using technology found in self-driving cars to power a machine learning application that helps guide patients' interventional radiology care, according to research presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting.
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Image: An elderly man is sitting on a home trainer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Stefan Schurr

Test could be leading to unnecessary open heart operations

02/03/2017

An approved international test to check whether people need open heart surgery could be sending twice as many people under the knife unnecessarily, at a cost of nearly £75m, research by the University of Leicester has suggested.
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