Image: Microscopic image of vesicles; Copyright: Norm Haughey's laboratory

How the injured brain tells the body it's hurt

19/05/2017

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new way that cells in the brain alert the rest of the body to recruit immune cells when the brain is injured. The work was completed in mouse models that mimic infection, stroke or trauma in humans.
Read more
Image: Three scientists in a laboratory; Copyright: The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth)

Possible new strategy to fight oral thrush

13/04/2017

An antimicrobial protein caused a dramatic reduction in the creamy white lesions associated with oral thrush in a preclinical study, report microbiologists with McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Findings appeared in the "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences".
Read more
Image: Cells under a microscope; Copyright: Jia Xie, Lerner Lab

New approach makes cells resistant to HIV

12/04/2017

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a way to tether HIV-fighting antibodies to immune cells, creating a cell population resistant to the virus. Their experiments under lab conditions show that these resistant cells can quickly replace diseased cells, potentially curing the disease in a person with HIV.
Read more
Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03/04/2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
Read more
Image: a  newborn; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Uberimages

Maternal pertussis vaccination reduces risk for newborns by more than 90 percent

03/04/2017

Among infants of women who received the Tdap pertussis booster vaccine during pregnancy, the risk of contracting pertussis was reduced by an estimated 91 percent during the first two months of life, the critical period before they can receive their first childhood acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccination.
Read more
Image: Graphical rendering of antibodies attacking cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ugreen

New drug delivery method for cancer therapy

23/03/2017

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a new drug delivery method that produces strong results in treating cancers in animal models, including some hard-to-treat solid and liquid tumors.
Read more
Image: Structural models of two proteins; Copyright: Hiroshima University

"Smart" genetic library – making disease diagnosis much easier

15/03/2017

Researchers at Hiroshima University have developed a smart genetic reference library for locating and weeding out disease-causing mutations in populations.
Read more
Image: Cars standing on a road, smog is everywhere around them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ssuaphoto

Air pollution can alter the effectiveness of antibiotics

06/03/2017

Researchers from the University of Leicester have for the first time discovered that bacteria that cause respiratory infections are directly affected by air pollution - increasing the potential for infection and changing the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment.
Read more
Photo: Child gets pierced into the finger using a lancing device

Diabetes: comprehensive prevention, early "vaccination"?

08/04/2016

A diagnosis of diabetes often catches new patients off guard - for instance if they end up in the emergency room suffering from metabolic decompensation. Children are often affected by this. Their immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas early on in their lives, thus causing type 1 diabetes.
Read more

Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
Read more
Photo: People in the waiting room of a doctor's office

Vaccines: activatable depot to replace multiple injections

22/08/2014

Besides antibiotics, vaccines may be the most important development in medicine: they protect us from diseases by “introducing” our immune system to pathogens. This way, a small injection saves us from severe and potentially mortal courses of disease.
Read more

Multi-resistant bacteria want to conquer the world

01/08/2014

Bacteria lurk everywhere: on the skin, in the intestines and in every puddle. Most of them that are hanging out in the human body are good bacteria. But not all of them. Those pathogens that exhibit resistance and are thus very hard to combat are the most dangerous kind. Their spread threatens people all over the world.
Read more

"The immunosensory system goes beyond the actual immune cells"

22/01/2014

It guards the body but can become its enemy: the immune system defends us from intruding pathogens; it is also able to cause severe diseases if it falsely recognizes the body itself as a threat. Molecular receptors in the whole body enable the immune system to “sense” what happens within.
Read more