Image: On a hand is painted a stop sign. In the background is written in big letters HIV; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filipefrazao

A path toward ending AIDS in the US by 2025

16/05/2017

A new study describes an ambitious but feasible path toward what may have seemed unachievable just a decade ago: an end to the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. Using prevention surveillance data to model rates of HIV incidence, prevalence and mortality, investigators set targets, specifically a decrease in new infections to 21,000 by 2020 and to 12,000 by 2025.
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Image: Somebody is throwing food intro a trash can; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Wasted food means wasted nutrients

16/05/2017

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future calculated the nutritional value of food wasted in the U.S. at the retail and consumer levels, shining a light on just how much protein, fiber and other important nutrients end up in the landfill in a single year.
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Image: Bread in a paper bag; Copyright: panthermedia.net / grafvision

Gluten-free diet not recommended for people without celiac disease

05/05/2017

Long term dietary intake of gluten among people without celiac disease is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease - and restricting gluten may result in a low intake of whole grains, which are associated with cardiovascular benefits, finds a study published by The BMJ.
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Alternative treatment approach for neonatal abstinence syndrome may shorten hospital stay

04/05/2017

New research suggests a revamped, "common sense" approach to treating newborns suffering opioid withdrawal--gauging whether the baby can eat, sleep and be consoled within 10 minutes before administering drugs to wean them off exposure--may safely reduce the length of hospitalization they need.
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Image: Paper-based plasma generators ; Copyright: Jingjin Xie

Zapping bacteria with sanitizers made of paper

03/05/2017

Imagine wearing clothes with layers of paper that protect you from dangerous bacteria. A Rutgers-led team has invented an inexpensive, effective way to kill bacteria and sanitize surfaces with devices made of paper.
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Image: mouse tooth under microscope ; Copyright: Klein Lab / UCSF

Mouse teeth providing new insights into tissue regeneration

02/05/2017

Researchers hope to use stem cells to heal burns, patch damaged heart tissue, even grow kidneys and other transplantable organs from scratch. This dream edges closer to reality, but one of the enduring puzzles for stem cell researchers is how these remarkable cells know when it's time for them to expand in numbers and transform into mature, adult cells in order to renew injured or aging tissue.
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Image: a white rooster ; Copyright: University of Rochester Medical Center

Using rooster testes to learn how the body fights viruses

02/05/2017

Our bodies are constantly under siege by foreign invaders; viruses, bacteria and parasites that want to infiltrate our cells. A new study in the journal eLife sheds light on how germ cells - sperm and egg - protect themselves from these attackers so that they can pass accurate genetic information to the next generation.
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Opportunities to overcome cancer treatment resistance

01/05/2017

A collaborative Cleveland Clinic, University of Oxford and Moffitt Cancer Center team of researchers has proven the theory that, while resistance to targeted treatment in cancer is truly a moving target, there are opportunities to overcome the resistance that develops.
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Significant economic burden from diabetes

28/04/2017

With more than 420 million affected individuals, as highlighted by the WHO Global report on diabetes issued for the 2016 World Diabetes Day, diabetes is among the leading metabolic diseases and a growing burden for health systems across the globe.
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Image: A preemie in an incubator; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ondrooo

Lab on a chip designed to minimize preterm births

27/04/2017

In the United States alone, a half million babies are born preterm; worldwide, the number is an estimated 15 million. Complications associated with preterm birth are the no. 1 cause of death for children under 5, and those who live often face a range of health problems.
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Image: A female psychologist is talking to a little girl; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness Images

Pediatric clinic support boosts mental health for youth

26/04/2017

A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University suggests that providing a brief behavioral therapy in the pediatric primary care setting can help more young people get the help they need. The brief intervention's benefits were especially noteworthy in Latino youth, more than three quarters of whom showed significant improvement.
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Image: a cell structure in blue; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ralwel

How to hack a cell

07/04/2017

The human body is made up of trillions of cells, microscopic computers that carry out complex behaviors according to the signals they receive from each other and their environment. Synthetic biologists engineer living cells to control how they behave by converting their genes into programmable circuits.
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Image: a young woman sleeping; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Pressmaster

Researchers find a 'sleep gene'

07/04/2017

Washington State University researchers have seen how a particular gene is involved in the quality of sleep experienced by three different animals, including humans.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: A female pharmacist is talking to a customer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Barabasa

Pharmacists: greater role in care prevents repeat hospital visits

24/03/2017

Pharmacists given an expanded role in patient oversight can reduce the likelihood of high-risk patients returning to the hospital, according to a new study that underscores a potential cost-saving solution for a growing physician shortage.
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'Geofencing' shows promise in tracking chronic care

23/03/2017

Location-tracking apps on smartphones could be used to help track and manage care for thousands of patients who suffer from chronic diseases, and possibly even provide feedback to them on lifestyle changes that could help, according to an initial assessment by researchers at UC San Francisco.
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Image: X-ray image of a scoliotic spine; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stockdevil_666

Degree of spinal deformity affects hip replacement surgery success

21/03/2017

People with spinal deformity also requiring a total hip replacement are at greater risk for dislocation or follow-up revision surgery, suggesting that these higher-risk patients may benefit from a more personalized approach to their surgeries to reduce the risk of poorer outcomes.
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Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01/03/2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Graphic: Bridge connecting EU and Russia; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Alexander Kharchenko

Is the Russia crisis also a crisis for medical technology?

01/10/2015

The Ukrainian political turmoil has been keeping the world in suspense since 2013. It has also caused growing tensions between Russia on the one hand and the U.S. and EU on the other hand. Both sides try to pressure each other with sanctions against individuals, international financial transactions and whole industry branches.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives

01/09/2015

They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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Medical Devices Directive: Inspected and still not safe

22/04/2015

The Medical Devices Directive defines what constitutes a medical device. At the same time, it inspects and monitors. However, scandals in the medical technology industry keep causing uncertainty. They rekindled debate over the safety and transparency of medical devices and also triggered changes on an international level. As a result, new laws are needed more than ever.
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Euthanasia – A Human Right?

01/12/2014

Several weeks ago on November 1, 2014, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, who suffered from terminal brain cancer, took drugs to end her life surrounded by her family. This was preceded by months of despair and anguish, but also by love and a lust for life as the young woman describes in several videos she recorded to fight for the right to die with dignity.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Pediatric anesthesia: "I would object to a specialty medical training"

01/09/2014

When very young children already need to be in the operating room, it’s not just the parents that are concerned. This type of situation is a special challenge for the entire operating team, because children are always very special patients - especially since they are not just simply small grown-ups!
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Photo: Physician talks to a girl

"Pediatric conditions often require pediatric-specific engineering"

10/03/2014

Children are not just small adults and they cannot be treated as such. Physicians have recognized this but manufacturers of medical devices have a hard time here: the market for pediatric medical devices is very small and researchers have difficulties to turn their ideas into commercially successful products.
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