Plasmasterilization: active ingredient cocktail to fight bacteria -- MEDICA Trade Fair

Plasmasterilization: active ingredient cocktail to fight bacteria

Interview with Prof. Katharina Stapelmann, Chair of General Electrical Engineering and Plasma Technology (AEPT), Ruhr University Bochum

06/01/2016

Photo: Smiling woman with long blond hair and glasses - Junior Prof. Katharina Stapelmann

Junior Prof. Katharina Stapelmann; ©Meike Klinck

Plasma sterilization - photo gallery

Photo: Female researcher with short dark hair and glasses works at a large apparatus
Junior professor Dr Katharina Stapelmann has built a plasma steriliser prototype at RUB.
Photo: Female researcher with short dark hair and glasses puts a transparent drawer box into an apparatus
The researcher designed the sterilisation chamber as a convenient drawer with a surface in DIN-A4 format.
Photo: Plastic parts inside a transparent, pink glowing drawer box
Katharina Stapelmann's steriliser is suitable not only for medical instruments and aerospace components. It can also remove germs from drill templates for tooth implants - and is thus of interest for dental technicians who have not as yet had any sterilisation devices for treating sensitive metal and plastic parts at their disposal.
Photo: Large metal apparatus with a pink glowing window in the front
The steriliser at the RUB lab deploys a hydrogen plasma that is characterised by its pink glow.
Photo: Carpets of spherical bacteria in a black-and-white image
For her sterilisation experiments, Katharina Stapelmann used screws that were coated by some 25 layers of a particularly persistent bacterium. By magnifying it by the factor 1000 under the scanning electron microscope, the single spherical bacteria cells are rendered visible.
Photo: Timo Roth; Copyright: B. Frommann

© B. Frommann