Novel Way to Prevent Drug-Induced Liver Injury -- MEDICA Trade Fair

Image: tools for blood testing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gisne

Blood samples may provide patient radiosensitivity answers

13/10/2017

How much radiation or chemotherapy can a certain person handle? With help from blood or tissue testing, it may be possible to answer this question in advance, which in turn could improve treatment, as research at Sahlgrenska Academy shows.
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New insights into how sleep helps the brain to reorganise itself

13/10/2017

A study has given new insights into how sleep contributes to brain plasticity – the ability for our brain to change and reorganise itself – and could pave the way for new ways to help people with learning and memory disorders.
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Image: abstract graphic about hereditary colon cancer; Copyright: IDIBELL

A new genetic marker accounts for up to 1.4 percent of cases of hereditary colon cancer

12/10/2017

The finding, once validated by other research groups, could allow patients with mutations in this gene to follow a clinical approach much more consistent with their genetics.
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Image: illustration of a cancer cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Stanford-led study uncovers mutation that supercharges tumor-suppressor

12/10/2017

Cancer researchers have long hailed p53, a tumor-suppressor protein, for its ability to keep unruly cells from forming tumors. But for such a highly studied protein, p53 has hidden its tactics well.
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Likely new treatment target identified for diabetic retinopathy

11/10/2017

In oxygen-compromising conditions like diabetes, the body grows new blood vessels to help, but the result is often leaky, dysfunctional vessels that make bad matters worse.
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Image: proteins that stand guard at transmembrane channels in the walls of nerve cells; Copyright: Rice University/UTHEALTH

Nerve cells' gatekeepers take many forms

11/10/2017

Rice, UTHealth researchers use light-sensitive molecules to track proteins critical to cell signaling.
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Genetic targets to chemo-resistant breast cancer identified

10/10/2017

Research led by Dr. Carlos Arteaga, Director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, has identified potential targets for treatment of triple negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of breast cancer.
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Image: Immune cells are more activated (red) in the brains of mice with the gene TREM2 (left) than in those without the gene (right); Copyright: DAVID HOLTZMAN LAB

Alzheimer's gene poses both risk and benefits

10/10/2017

Study suggests role of inflammation in brain disease is complicated.
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Why do we fall asleep when bored?

09/10/2017

University of Tsukuba researcher discovers why we have the tendency to fall asleep in the absence of motivating stimuli, when bored.
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New approaches in targeted cancer therapy

06/10/2017

In a large-scale testing procedure, scientists from Cologne University Hospital have explored the effects of more than 1,500 substances on different kinds of cancer cells. The results from this study are a fundamental prerequisite for the development of new therapies for NMC, an aggressive cancer which is often lethal.
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Image: microscopic images of stem cells; Copyright: Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Amount of water in stem cells can determine its fate as fat or bone

05/10/2017

Adding or removing water from a stem cell can change the destiny of the cell, researchers have discovered in a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Brain cells that control appetite identified for first time

04/10/2017

Dieting could be revolutionised, thanks to the ground-breaking discovery by the University of Warwick of the key brain cells which control our appetite.
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Fresh blood for damaged tissues via alginate hydrogels

29/09/2017

Biomaterial-mediated delivery of blood vessel growth factors could be used as a therapeutic strategy to treat peripheral vascular disease.
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Diabetes medicine reduces Parkinson's risk

28/09/2017

A Norwegian study shows that the taking of diabetes medicine reduces the risk of getting Parkinson's disease.
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Image: woman holding a hand to her throat, which is marked red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vonschonertagen

New treatment for chronic throat irritation and globus sensation in the gullet

26/09/2017

Chronic throat irritation, a permanent globus sensation, a sore or dry sensation in the throat are common symptoms, which are often trivialised and wrongly attributed to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. However, these are also the characteristic symptoms of patients suffering from displaced gastric mucosa in the oesophagus (ectopic mucosa).
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Stimuli fading away en route to consciousness

26/09/2017

Whether or not we consciously perceive the stimuli projected onto our retina is decided in our brain. A recent study by the University of Bonn shows how some signals dissipate along the processing path to conscious perception. This process begins at rather late stages of signal processing.
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Image: Zebrafish β-cells labeled using the Beta-bow system; Copyright: Ninov lab

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

25/09/2017

Dr. Nikolay Ninov, group leader at the DFG research center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden (PLID), and his group developed a system called "Beta-bow", which allows the history of β-cells to be traced by genetic bar-coding and multicolor imaging.
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Image: cross section through a healthy bone above cross section of a bone with osteoporosis ; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Roberto_Biasini

Researchers describe mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss

25/09/2017

This knowledge can provide targets in the search for novel bone-loss therapeutics to treat osteoporosis.
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Drugs in disguise heal the brain

22/09/2017

The treatment of brain diseases is on the verge of a breakthrough. Researchers from Aalborg University are developing a new method that 'smuggles' medicine past the brain's defense systems, giving hope that diseases such as Alzheimer's can one day be cured.
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Image: image of how Taxanes induce tripolar instead of normal bipolar cell division; Copyright: Munich University Hospital

Cancer drug stimulates tripolar mode of mitosis

21/09/2017

Taxanes inhibit cell division and make cancer cells sensitive to radiation therapy. A current study has investigated the underlying mechanisms of this action – and which biomarkers may be useful for predicting the success of therapy.
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Immune cells help fat deal with environmental challenges

20/09/2017

Immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells play an important role in the functioning of adipose tissue. This is the discovery of scientists from the Helmholtz Diabetes Center (HDC) at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Their findings are published in the journal 'Cell Metabolism'.
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A hair-trigger for cells fighting infection

19/09/2017

To fight infections cells in the immune system play a dangerous game with their own genes. Damaging genes allows B cells to make antibodies that are specifically equipped to target to specific causes of illness, but damaging genes also puts them at risk of becoming cancerous.
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Image: Comparison of normal vs hepatoblastoma liver tissue; Copyright: Etienne Meylan/EPFL

Metabolism can be used to subtype hepatoblastoma tumors

19/09/2017

Looking at cell metabolism instead of histology, EPFL scientists have identified new biomarkers that could help more accurately classify the two main subtypes of hepatoblastoma, a children liver cancer. Hepatoblastoma is a rare pediatric liver cancer, usually diagnosed in the first three years of life.
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Study on transplanted hearts reveals risk genes for cardiovascular diseases

15/09/2017

With participation of the Helmholtz Zentrum München, an international research team has discovered a number of new risk factors for dilated cardiomyopathy and other heart conditions. In the largest transcriptome study to date, the researchers analysed the RNA of transplanted hearts. The study was recently published in "Genome Biology".
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Asthma drug from the garden center

15/09/2017

The coralberry could offer new hope for asthmatics: researchers at the University of Bonn have extracted a new kind of active pharmaceutical ingredient from its leaves to combat this widespread respiratory disease.
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Image: cross-section of a blood vessel; copyright: panthermedia.net/Dr. Lange

Correlation between height and risk of thrombosis

14/09/2017

In a new study from Lund University in Sweden, researchers investigated the risk factors for blood clots, i.e. venous thromboembolism (VTE). The results show a strong correlation between height and VTE risk for both women and men. The risk increases with height.
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Study identifies multiple roles of glucose metabolism in platelet activation and survival

14/09/2017

Research may inform how increased glucose metabolism may contribute to the increased risk of thrombosis in diabetes and how altering platelet glucose metabolism influences platelet function
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Image: liver with a warning sign on it; copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

How liver cancer develops

13/09/2017

Liver cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death and represents the fastest rising cancer worldwide. In most cases, the tumor develops in patients with chronic liver disease. Such diseases include chronic infections with hepatitis viruses or a so-called fatty liver due to nutritional or genetically caused lipometabolic disorders or an excessive consumption of alcohol.
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Thorough analysis reveals immune system dynamics after immunotherapy

13/09/2017

By combining new system-biological analyses and advanced data analysis, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have been able to monitor the maturation process of the immune system of leukaemia patients who have undergone stem cell transplantation.
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New osteoporosis treatment uses traditional Chinese herb to prevent bone loss

12/09/2017

An herb widely used in traditional Chinese medicine might hold the key to a new osteoporosis therapy that could prevent bone loss without causing side effects.
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How new blood vessels sprout

11/09/2017

IBS biologists discovered a key regulator of normal as well as pathological formation of new blood vessels.
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From bed to bench and back to bed: Mimicking how HPV-positive cancer responds to treatment

11/09/2017

Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who are positive for human papilloma virus (HPV-positive) have been observed to respond significantly better to chemo-radiotherapy than HPV-negative patients. This observation is surprising because HPV infection leads to an increased risk of developing oropharyngeal cancer. To date, the reason for this dichotomy has not been well understood.
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Image: blue coloured cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chirawan Somsanuk

New receptor found on scavenger cells

08/09/2017

Adenoviral infections have a mild disease progression in healthy people, but it can be dangerous for immunocompromised people. If a patient is infected with the virus and gets a bacterial infection on top of it, it can lead to an excessive inflammatory response known as a cytokine storm, an overreaction by the immune system leading to high concentrations of proteins that promote inflammation.
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Image: Diagram of the research results; Copyright: Osaka University

New drug targets for a rare kidney and liver disease

07/09/2017

In a joint international study, researchers from Osaka University have partnered with research groups from the United States and Spain to uncover how mutations in a single gene called PKHD1 lead to symptoms associated with a rare kidney and liver disease, ARPKD (autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease).
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Recurrence of prostate cancer could be reduced thanks to exciting new discovery

06/09/2017

Ground breaking research could reduce the recurrence of prostate cancer in males, a new study in the journal Nature Communications reports.
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Treating arthritis with algae

06/09/2017

Researchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and the Norwegian research institute SINTEF are pursuing a new approach to treating arthritis. This is based on a polysaccharide, a long-chain sugar molecule, originating from brown algae.
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Mayo Clinic researchers review the clinical potential of senolytic drugs on aging

05/09/2017

Researchers are moving closer to realizing the clinical potential of drugs that have previously been shown to support healthy aging in animals.
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Foetal genes can increase the risk of illness during pregnancy

04/09/2017

For the first time, a relationship has been found between foetal genes and the risk of preeclampsia in the mother. Norwegian researchers, including a team from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), figure prominently in the international group that presented the find in "Nature Genetics", first published online earlier this summer.
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Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuit

04/09/2017

New research reveals the mechanisms behind the effects of chronic stress and tiny inflammations in the brain on fatal gut failure. Hokkaido University researchers revealed that fatal gut failure in a multiple sclerosis (MS) mouse model, EAE, under chronic stress is caused by a newly discovered nerve pathway.
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Researchers identify the component that allows a lethal type of bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics

01/09/2017

Scientists at IRB Barcelona identify a key component of the machinery that allows Staphylococcus aureus to transfer genes that confer antibiotic resistance.
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DNA sensor plays critical role in cancer immunotherapy via response to unexpected DNA form

31/08/2017

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report for the first time that tumors stressed by cancer immunotherapy release their mitochondrial DNA into nearby immune cells, triggering a host alert system.
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Obese people lack cells with satiety hormones

30/08/2017

Individuals with severe overweight have an inhibited sense of satiation - they release fewer satiety hormones than people of normal weight. The reason: the responsible cells in the gastrointestinal tract of obese people are severely reduced. This report Swiss doctors in the journal Scientific Reports. Surgical weight-loss procedures can repair this disorder.
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How cells hack their own genes

30/08/2017

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New insights into the world of trypanosomes

29/08/2017

Such detailed images of the pathogen that causes sleeping sickness inside a host are unique so far: They illustrate the manifold ways in which the parasites move inside a tsetse fly. A research team from the University of Würzburg's Biocenter has presented the images.
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Understanding how omega-3 dampens inflammatory reactions

29/08/2017

Omega-3 fatty acids, which we primarily get through eating fatty fish, have long been thought to be good for our health. Many dietary studies have suggested that high intake is associated with a reduced risk of various disorders. Clinical trials have also shown beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in patients taking omega-3 supplements.
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Study by Aston University and Birmingham Children's Hospital shows complex relationship between weight and asthma

28/08/2017

Researchers at Aston University and clinicians at Birmingham Children's Hospital are exploring how children living with asthma can be supported to maintain a healthy weight.
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RNA: a vicious pathway to cancer?

25/08/2017

According to the current doctrine, cancer cells develop due to mutations in genomic DNA. But could it be also caused also by faulty RNA molecules? A number of clues are pointing to this surprising hypothesis.
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New test for rare immunodeficiency

23/08/2017

Researchers at the University of Basel have developed a test to quickly and reliably diagnose a rare and severe immune defect, hepatic veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency. They reported on their findings in the "Journal of Clinical Immunology".
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Image: illustration of co‐expression networks; Copyright: KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Study offers new targets for drugs to treat fatty liver disease and liver cancer

23/08/2017

There may be no silver bullet for treating liver cancer or fatty liver disease, but knowing the right targets will help science develop the most effective treatments. Researchers in Sweden have just identified a number of drug targets that can be used in the development of new efficient treatment strategies with minimum side effects.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: model of a man holding a shield and fighting against illustrated pathogens; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andreus

Immune system can be modulated by targeted manipulation of cell metabolism

22/08/2017

In its attempt to fight a serious bacterial infection, caused by listeria, for example, the immune system can become so over-activated that the resulting inflammatory response and its consequences can quickly lead to death.
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Image: Empa’s multicellular model, which is mimicking the placental barrier: a core of connective tissue cells, surrounded by trophoblast cells; Copyright: Empa

Medication for the unborn baby

21/08/2017

An Empa team has succeeded in developing a new three-dimensional cell model of the human placental barrier. The "model organ" can quickly and reliably deliver new information on the intake of substances, such as nano-particles, by the placental barrier and on any possible toxic effects for the unborn child.
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Image: chalk board with sketch of sugar molecule formula; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Boris Zerwann

Cancer detection with sugar molecules

16/08/2017

Scientists from the University of Würzburg have synthesized a complex sugar molecule which specifically binds to the tumor protein Galectin-1. This could help to recognize tumors at an early stage and to combat them in a targeted manner
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Antidepressant use increases risk of head injuries among persons with Alzheimer’s disease

15/08/2017

Antidepressant use is associated with an increased risk of head injuries and traumatic brain injuries among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Antidepressant use has previously been linked with an increased risk of falls and hip fractures, but the risk of head injuries has not been studied before.
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New ultrafast method for determining antibiotic resistance

15/08/2017

Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method for very rapidly determining whether infection-causing bacteria are resistant or susceptible to antibiotics. The findings have now been published in the US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Image: hand and blood sugar measuring device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gisne

Transforming skin cells to insulin

14/08/2017

Researchers at the University of Bergen have transformed skin puncture cells from diabetes patients into insulin producing cells, using stem cell techniques. The researchers' aim is to transplant these cells under the skin of people with diabetes.
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Image: Sample of lung fibrosis; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell aging in lung epithelial cells

08/08/2017

Pulmonary fibrosis can possibly be attributed to a kind of cellular aging process, which is called senescence. This has been shown by researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL). As they report in the European Respiratory Journal, they have already successfully counteracted this mechanism in the cell culture with the help of drugs.
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Image: Illustration of the Drosophila synaptonemal complex; Copyright: Ryan Kramer

Marriage of microscopy techniques reveals 3-D structure of critical protein complex

07/08/2017

Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have solved the three-dimensional structure of a complex that is essential for the correct sorting of chromosomes into eggs and sperm during reproductive cell division or meiosis.
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Immune system may mount an attack in Parkinson's disease

04/08/2017

A new study suggests that T cells, which help the body's immune system recognize friend from foe, may play an important role in Parkinson's disease (PD). The study, published in the journal Nature, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.
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In the test tube instead of under the knife

04/08/2017

Freiburg neuroscientists develop new forms of diagnosis and therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy.
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A molecule for proper neural wiring in the cerebellum

02/08/2017

A molecule produced by insulating glial cells facilitates the functional wiring of brain cells involved in motor coordination.
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Image: human body with arteries and venes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Pixelchaos

Tracking the mechanism of artery formation

01/08/2017

Arteriogenesis is a critical event – not only during development but also in adult life. Cardiovascular life-threatening events could be overcome for example by inducing the formation of new arteries. A team of scientists led by Ralf Adams from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine has developed a genetic approach in mice to uncover molecular mechanisms of arterial growth.
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Cell mechanism discovery could lead to "fundamental" change in leukemia treatment

01/08/2017

Researchers have identified a new cell mechanism that could lead to a fundamental change in the diagnosis and treatment of leukaemia.
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Should we be worried about hepatitis E?

31/07/2017

Hepatitis E gets little press compared to its better-known cousins A, B and C, but Stellenbosch University virologists say we should wake up to how transmission of this virus is changing.
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Image: An eye surgeon and an assistant are treating a patient with a surgical laser; Copyright: University Hospital Dresden/Felix Koopmann

Eye surgery: precision and prevention with femtosecond lasers

03/07/2017

Precision work is absolutely essential in eye surgery since the surgical site is very minute and sensitive. This is why eye surgeons have been using lasers for years. Femtosecond lasers are especially well suited to serve this purpose because they are able to cut tissue with great precision and little energy, which prevents unwanted side effects of surgery.
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Image: Zebrafish brain, fluorescence image (left) and 3D image (right); Copyright: private

"A 3D movie of the brain in action"

08/12/2016

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other – for a long time this was possible only to a limited extent. The current techniques can visualize only superficial layers or the imaging they use is too slow. But now, Prof Daniel Razansky and his team have found a new method to visualize the brain activity – by using optoacoustics.
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Image: User interface of a software; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell under observation: "The software lets us study the development on video"

08/08/2016

What happens when stem cells differentiate? What molecular characteristics do they have? Questions that can now be easier answered with the help of a new open-source software. We spoke with Prof. Fabian Theis at the Helmholtz Center Munich, who participated in the software development.
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Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
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Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Great leaps forward thanks to new methods

01/02/2016

Self-healing powers like a superhero on the big screen? That’s the aim of regenerative medicine; at least in a very broad sense. This promising field of biomedicine is currently highly dynamic with innovative technologies and development. New methods are designed to help propel medicine into a whole new sphere.
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Different specialties, one goal – treating children right

01/02/2016

Children, especially newborns, are generally no longer simply considered to be small adults whose treatment just needs to be "reduced". This is why a pediatrician’s education includes several specialties because ultimately everything in terms of care comes together here.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Hospital crisis communication: A crisis knows no rules

02/03/2015

Crises come in many shapes and sizes. Whether it’s poor hygiene, thefts or treatment errors – once the crisis has arrived, things need to move quickly. For hospitals in particular, the right crisis communication is key. Yet many medical facilities still neglect the fact that crisis communication starts before the actual crisis takes place.
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Photo: Tissue sections on object slides

Digital pathology: From microscope slide to virtual microscopy

02/02/2015

The digitization of medicine moves on. Researchers, physicians and patients equally benefit from this development – thanks to improved diagnostics with highly sensitive devices, today findings can be comprehensively analyzed and treatment decisions made on a broadened basis. Digitization also offers the area of pathology interesting fields of application.
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Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
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Wound treatment with fish skin

03/11/2014

The treatment of chronic wounds is extremely problematic. Chronic wounds can take months or years to heal and some even never heal resulting in over 100.000 amputations taking place annually in the US alone. A new technology from Iceland, that is based on fish skin and is already used clinically, allows for improved healing of chronic and burn wounds.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Cultured skin makes large-scale transplantations possible

01/07/2014

Large burns require skin grafting. Surgeons remove split-thickness skin grafts and apply them to the injured areas. Now skin that has been made in a laboratory is meant to help in covering burns as well as chronic wounds and thus promote the healing process. Researchers in Zurich have been working on this for more than 13 years.
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Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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"We don’t know why certain pharmaceuticals bind especially well while others bind barely at all"

10/02/2014

Prof. Joachim Heberle from the Free University of Berlin wants to make the smallest protein structures visible under the microscope. He wants to accomplish this with an infrared microscope, originating in the field of physics. He told MEDICA.de which technology is behind all this and what he also wants to examine with it in the future.
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Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
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"The immunosensory system goes beyond the actual immune cells"

22/01/2014

It guards the body but can become its enemy: the immune system defends us from intruding pathogens; it is also able to cause severe diseases if it falsely recognizes the body itself as a threat. Molecular receptors in the whole body enable the immune system to “sense” what happens within.
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