Noninvasive Brain Tumor Treatment Is Possible -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Brown University researchers developed user-friendly software to help neuroscientists and clinicians connect the neural activity of the brain's outer layers to EEG recordings, which could help

New tool developed at Brown will aid in understanding brain signals

17/10/2018

The human brain contains about 90 billion neurons, Stephanie Jones, an associate professor of neuroscience at Brown University, doesn't let that staggering number faze her. In fact, she just released a user-friendly software tool that models the neural circuits in the outer layers of the brain, which produce the electrical activity monitored by noninvasive techniques.
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Image: Department of Epileptology; Copyright: Rolf Müller/UKB-Ukom

Nerve cells in the human brain can „count“

25/09/2018

How do we know if we're looking at three apples or four? Researchers at the Universities of Bonn and Tübingen are now one step closer to answering this question. They were able to demonstrate that some brain cells fire mainly for quantities of three, others for quantities of four and others for other quantities.
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Image: Image shows brain maps with information processing hubs represented as black dots; Copyright: Jennifer Brown Research Laboratory, the University of Edinburgh

Breast milk may be best for premature babies' brain development

24/09/2018

Babies born before their due date show better brain development when fed breast milk rather than formula, a study has found. Experts say that helping mothers to provide breast milk in the weeks after giving birth could improve long-term outcomes for children born pre-term.
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Image: Tiny probes could be useful for monitoring patients with Parkinson's and other diseases; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Astrid Gast

New sensors track dopamine in the brain for more than year

13/09/2018

Dopamine, a signaling molecule used throughout the brain, plays a major role in regulating our mood, as well as controlling movement. Many disorders, including Parkinson's disease, depression, and schizophrenia, are linked to dopamine deficiencies.
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Image: Representation of neurons and synapses; Copyright: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST)

Artificial synaptic device simulating the function of human brain

12/09/2018

A research team led by Director Myoung-Jae Lee from the Intelligent Devices and Systems Research Group at DGIST has succeeded in developing an artificial synaptic device that mimics the function of the nerve cells (neurons) and synapses that are response for memory in human brains.
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Image: Pain response in babies' brains; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kiyoshi Takahase Segundo

Pain response in babies' brains controlled in „similar way to adults“

12/09/2018

Researchers from the Department of Paediatrics and Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging at the University of Oxford, UK, have identified the neural network that helps control babies' brain activity in response to pain in a similar way to adults.
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Image: Brain overheating; Copyright:Lion_on_helium MIPT Press Office

Chip controlling exoskeleton keeps patients' brains cool

11/09/2018

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a model for predicting hand movement trajectories based on cortical activity: Signals are measured directly from a human brain. The predictions rely on linear models. This offloads the processor, since it requires less memory and fewer computations in comparison with neural networks.
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Image: New screening strategy gives rise to identification of novel inhibitors of α-synuclein aggregation; Copyright: Daniel Otzen

Parkinson: New high-throughput screening

11/09/2018

Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder in the world. PD patients suffer from shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and have difficulties walking. It is neurodegenerative disease and is caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the brain.
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Image: The male fruit fly uses his song to attract the female.; Copyright: Angela O'Sullivan

Flirting flies: More than just winging it

27/08/2018

Studies of the song of the fruit flies reveal new findings of how the neurons in the brain function. These results can be used to uncover new knowledge on how brains in general function which in the longer term may have medical significance.
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Image: elderly man does an exercise with a robot; Copyright: Shelly Levy-Tzedek

Robots as tools and partners in rehabilitation

20/08/2018

In future decades the need for effective strategies for medical rehabilitation will increase significantly, because patients' rate of survival after diseases with severe functional deficits, such as a stroke, will increase. Socially assistive robots (SARs) are already being used in rehabilitation for this reason.
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Image: the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stockdevil666

Large collection of brain cancer data

16/08/2018

A valuable cache of brain cancer biomedical data has been made freely available to researchers worldwide, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. The dataset, REMBRANDT (REpository for Molecular BRAin Neoplasia DaTa) hosted and supported by Georgetown, is one of only two such large collections in the country.
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Image:W. Christopher Risher, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine; Copyright: Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of M

3D electron microscopy reveals Insights into brain circuitry

13/08/2018

New research from a team led by Marshall University scientist W. Christopher Risher, Ph.D., reveals novel molecular insights into how multiple cell types drive the formation and maturation of brain circuits.
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Image: image from the video game

A video game can change the brain

10/08/2018

A space-exploring robot crashes on a distant planet. In order to gather the pieces of its damaged spaceship, it needs to build emotional rapport with the local alien inhabitants. The aliens speak a different language but their facial expressions are remarkably humanlike.
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Image: Triculture System Fully Replicates Alzheimer's Pathology; Copyright: Genetics and Aging Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease

Microfluidic system incorporates neuroinflammation

03/08/2018

Building on their development of the first culture system to replicate fully the pathology behind Alzheimer's disease, a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has now produced a system that includes neuroinflammation, the key biological response that leads to the death of brain cells.
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Image: Setting up a microscope; Copyright:Allen Institute

Openscope: the first shared observatory for neuroscience

02/08/2018

The Allen Institute for Brain Science, a division of the Allen Institute, announced the launch of OpenScope, a project that will give researchers access to the Institute's "observatory of the mind" to study the activity of nerve cells in the visual cortex of the mouse. OpenScope was modeled after shared astronomy observatories that have been the seat of major findings about the physical universe.
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Image: An image of oligortical spheroids in wells; Copyright: Case Western Reserve School of Medicine

A new milestone in laboratory grown human brain tissue

01/08/2018

A cutting-edge laboratory technique turns human stem cells into brain-like tissue now recapitulates human brain development. The new study from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine was published in Nature Methods and shows how to grow brain "organoids"--self-organizing mini spheres that now contain all the major cell types found in the human cerebral cortex-in laboratory dishes.
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Image: A new diagnostic blood test helps rule out need for CT scans in patients with possible TBI; Copyright: panthermedia-net-ktsdesign

New diagnostic blood test helps rule out need for CT scans

01/08/2018

Research conducted at the Wayne State University School of Medicine has helped confirm the effectiveness of a blood biomarker that can indicate if patients with a head injury can avoid a costly CT scan because the blood test results indicate no traumatic brain injury (TBI).
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Image: Older couple is sitting next to each other, using their smartphones; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Fabrice Michaudeau

Neurology: Early detection of Parkinson’s disease with app and data?

01/08/2018

Big Data is often likened to finding the proverbial needle in a haystack: Large volumes of data contain patterns that hold the answer to a particular question. The trick is to gather meaningful data and identify patterns. The i-PROGNOSIS research project shows how smart devices and an app team up to automatically collect data without disturbing the user.
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Image: Physician next to a woman who is doing a breath test; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Breath test for Parkinson's

31/07/2018

Symptoms of Parkinson's disease include tremor, loss of smell and neuropsychiatric problems. However, many people are not diagnosed until their disease is well-advanced, which could limit their treatment options.
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Image: 3D single molecule super-resolution images of the amyloid plaques; Copyright: Purdue University image/Fenil Patel

3D super-resolution imaging to see Alzheimer's

30/07/2018

Recent studies show that 40 percent of Americans over the age of 85 have Alzheimer's disease, and that the disease begins 10 to 20 years before people show up at the doctor's office with memory problems.
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Image: doctor holds x-rays of the skull in the height; Copyright: panthermedia.net/HASLOO

New stroke imaging technology

25/07/2018

A new study, presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 15th Annual Meeting, found that new stroke imaging technology could decrease delays in care by up to 60 minutes, giving patients a better chance at making a full recovery.
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Image: 3D single molecule super-resolution images of the amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease; Copyright: Purdue University image/Fenil Patel

Alzheimer's disease: new development in 3D super-resolution imaging

25/07/2018

Recent studies show that 40 percent of Americans over the age of 85 have Alzheimer's disease, and that the disease begins 10 to 20 years before people show up at the doctor's office with memory problems.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: Zebrafish brain, fluorescence image (left) and 3D image (right); Copyright: private

"A 3D movie of the brain in action"

08/12/2016

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other – for a long time this was possible only to a limited extent. The current techniques can visualize only superficial layers or the imaging they use is too slow. But now, Prof Daniel Razansky and his team have found a new method to visualize the brain activity – by using optoacoustics.
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Image: Eileen Stark prepares Dominik Wetzel for a measurement; Copyright: WHZ/Helge Gerischer

Paraplegia: moving muscles using electrical impulses

22/11/2016

It happens about 1,800 times per year: after a sporting or traffic-related accident, a person’s spinal cord is injured to where nerve tracts are severed and he/she becomes paralyzed. Researchers now want to develop software that measures the brain signals of paralyzed patients and sends out electrical impulses via a system to stimulate muscles, causing them to move again.
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Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
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Photo: laboratory mouse eating something

Multiple Sclerosis: does the colon affect the immune system?

01/12/2015

Multiple sclerosis apparently can strike anyone - regardless of age, family history, lifestyle or gender. Yet why then does it not strike everyone? Genetic and environmental factors appear not to be the only reason whether it develops or not. The countless microorganisms that colonize our intestinal tract could also be involved in this.
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ECG measurements: "Our chest strap moistens itself"

01/07/2015

When measuring myocardial activity, it is important for the skin to always stay moist under the electrodes of the ECG. Only then can data be consistently transferred. Athletes have an easier time with this: they are used to sweating. This is a lot harder for older patients.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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Persistent vegetative state: brain stimulation with laser beams

01/09/2014

The public only notices diseases when celebrities become patients: in the spring of 2014, Formula One driver Michael Schumacher fell into a coma for several months as the result of a head injury caused by a skiing accident. These types of accidents show how delicate the brain responds to injuries. Brain stimulation could possibly support the rehabilitation of vegetative patients.
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Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
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